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#SupplyChain lessons and innovations from the history of #USA brewing industry

Worth a full read.  Paul Lord, a research director at Gartner, provides great examples about #manufacturing , #production , and #marketing  from Ambitious Brew: The Story of American Brew, by Maureen Ogle.

Citation: Beer is an industry that was founded as a chemical manufacturing operation (shipped in kegs and served in taverns) and transformed into a consumer industry dominated by marketing and brand management.  Along the way, the winners applied supply chain fundamentals and innovations to secure their success. / #DriveInnovation  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Steve Blank's speech on the Next 50 Years of Business Innovation

Much could be excerpted from his commencement speech at ESADE. We found the  serial-entrepreneur's distinctions in the definition of innovation useful.

Citation:
At its most basic, innovation means to introduce something new. But in a business context, the meaning gets more nuanced. I’d like to describe the four types of innovation you can build inside a corporation: / #DriveInnovation  

The first type of corporate innovation is individual initiative. It's exactly as it sounds--you build a corporate culture where anyone can suggest an idea and start a project. Some companies use a suggestion box, others like Google give employees 20 percent of their time to work on their own projects. / #HumanResources  

The second type of business innovation is called process improvement. This is the kind most of us are familiar with. Car companies introduce new models each year, running shoes grow ever lighter and more flexible, Coca-Cola offers a new version of Coke. Smart companies are always looking to make their current products better--and there are many ways to do this. For example they can reduce component cost, introduce a line extension or create new versions of the existing product. These innovations do not require change in a company's existing business model. / #SaveMoney  

This is what companies typically do to secure and defend their core business.

The third type of business innovation--continuous innovation--is much harder. Continuous innovation builds on a strength of the company's current business model but requires that new elements be created. For example, Coke added snack foods, which could be distributed through its existing distribution channels. The Amazon Kindle played on Amazon's strengths as a distributor of content but required developing expertise in electronics and manufacturing. /   #Manufacturing   #Production   #SupplyChain  

Fourth and finally is disruptive innovation. This is the innovation we associate with startups. This type of innovation creates new products or new services that did not exist before. It's the automobile in the 1910's, radio in the 1920's, television in the 1950's, the integrated circuit in the 1960's, the fax machine in the 1970's, personal computers in the 1980's, the Internet in the 1990's, and the Smartphone, human genome sequencing, and even fracking in this decade. These innovations are exactly what Schumpeter and Christensen were talking about. They create new industries and destroy existing ones. And interestingly, in spite of all their resources, large companies are responsible for very, very few disruptive innovations. / #DisruptiveInnovation  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Glimpsing the future of #Manufacturing with Joi Ito

Jon Bruner  interviews Joi Ito, the director of the MIT Media Lab. Ito explains that the "Media Lab’s emphasis is on projects that go all the way to manufacturing and distributing: moving from 'demo or die' to 'deploy or die'". Projects that are deployed can put thousands of devices into the hands of users rather than just a couple. The most creative companies he suggests are the ones that design hardware and software together.
via radar.oreilly.com/2014/04/joi-ito-deploy-or-die.html

At 24 min into the video he recommends that manufacturers become more systems-oriented, using data to consider the impacts of production and the supply chain ecosystem.

Tim O'Reilly comments on G+: "The code that makes sense of it all" is a key #IoT  concept not discussed often enough. (http://goo.gl/AkFm4J)

#Manufacturing   #SupplyChain   #Production   #DriveInnovation   #InternetofThings  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Four maturity stages of Servitisation

The trend analysts at Ascent Look Out foresee the phenomenon of servitisation transforming entire product industries: "from ‘technology-push and product’ oriented to ‘customer-pull and service’ oriented." The analysts suggest that both B2B and B2C companies have begun developing services as a way to grow income. They point to  "Software as a Service" (SaaS) as a viable example of servitisation which demonstrates how goods can be sold by the amount of functionality that they deliver to a customer within a particular timeframe. 

Citation:
Developing a product business towards a service business typically involves four maturity stages:
1) Product manufacturer: sell products and charge for basic break-fix services.
2) Value added manufacturer: sell products and service to enhance the product performance.
3) Full service provider: replace products by (managed) services and enhance customers’ operational performance.
4) Integrated solution provider: take over (parts of) customers operations.

#Manufacturing   #Production   #DriveInnovation  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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The Data Scientist is the New Product Manager
Researcher Gil Press is Managing Partner of gPress. 12.july.12

 Mingsheng Hong, Chief Data Scientist at Hadapt:
"Mingsheng’s assertion [is] that the data scientist is the new product manager. 'Data scientists are taking a data-driven position to make the product better,' he said. He qualified himself somewhat by saying that this is true 'especially for the platform vendors, where data scientists can help develop a product that is really easy to use.' This way, data scientists in these companies (such as Hadapt, I guess), empower not just one user at a time, but 'empower a wave of new users and companies that benefit from data science.'"
. . . . 
"Good product managers have always been data-driven, bringing the voice of the market to bear on innovative ideas that are sometimes an engineering or manufacturing marvel but have no chance of market acceptance. Of course, it could also be the other way around—that great breakthroughs are shot down because of 'gut feelings' or biased use of market data. So having data scientists as some or all of your product managers may help make product-related decision-making more rigorous than it is currently practiced in your company."

#MarketIntelligence   #Production     #DriveInnovation     #Manufacturing   #DecisionMaking  

HT +Adam Scislowicz 

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Five key trends for #UK #manufacturing industry in next decade

"In line with other major economies, UK manufacturing has undergone a period of decline, yet continues to make a significant contribution to GDP. It remains vital for long term economic growth and sustainability. According to a 2012 study by McKinsey called ‘Manufacturing the future, the next era of global growth and innovation’, manufacturing generates up to 70 per cent of exports in major manufacturing economies, and up to 90 per cent of business R&D spending."
. . . . 
"There is considerable consistency with firms from different manufacturing sub-sectors expressing very similar concerns and plans for a range of external influences, including a volatile global economy, growing international competition, ever stricter legislation and sustainability targets, rising energy and raw material costs, the impact of new technologies, and business pressures to reduce complexity, boost efficiency, streamline operations and drive innovation."

Here are the top 5 trends that will impact the industry over the next ten years:

1.     Globalisation requires a new approach
Companies are moving closer to their customers and establishing a presence in regions with high growth potential or influence. / #Globalisation  

2.     Innovation and speed will be critical
According to PwC’s 2013 report ‘Preparing for Growth, manufacturers adopt new strategies for growth and competitive edge’, “survival in today’s global market and investing in the future requires organisations to innovate and be able to commercialise successful innovations quickly.” / #GrowIncome     #DriveInnovation  

3.     Portfolios and production lines will focus on profitable products
... shifting focus to a limited number of high-value, high-functionality products – those that generate the greatest revenue for the business. [...] Adopting new technology will help manufacturers bring their products to market faster than their competitors. / #OnDemand   #Production  

4.     IT and intelligence will have an inestimable impact
Improved enterprise resource planning software, the use of radio frequency identification (RFID) tags and enhanced production line automation and monitoring already boost efficiency and operations and will continue to have a significant impact on the manufacturing industry. [...] In addition, cloud-based technologies and software-as-a-service (SaaS) applications will underpin more collaborative, agile and mobile working practices. / #Collaboration   #InformationTechnology   #Mobile   #InternetofThings  

5.     Sustainability will be an industry-wide standard
"Energy costs are continuing to rise and there are increasing pressures to reduce environmental impact and waste. Over the course of the next decade many firms will be turning to newer, cleaner technologies to power their operations and support their services across the world. Energy management will become a key part of every manufacturer’s responsibilities." / #ConserveEnergy

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Big Data and Manufacturing Quality

"By using an enterprise Hadoop solution, manufacturers can not only manage the growing data volume from sensor data and automated processes, but also better analyze and share that data, so issues can be addressed quickly and valuable pro-active insights can be gained. In the area of service management, manufacturers can install and monitor sensors to track how the product is used and gain visibility to service requirements the product might need."
....
"Big data solutions provide a huge opportunity for manufacturers to cut costs, improve efficiency and ultimately improve the quality of their product by catching problems faster and adapting their products based on how it is actually used by the consumer. As the Internet of things continues to expand, the opportunity for manufacturers to benefit from this data will only continue to grow."

#InternetOfThings #Manufacturing #Production #SaveMoney #BigData #RealTime #OnDemand #BusinessIntelligence

Posted by +Dan Durrant ht +David Pidsley 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Data Analysis Should Be a Social Event

"Psychologists believe that creativity flourishes in social contexts, as thoughts are translated into words, objects or images and in turn reformulated into ideas (this is one of the reasons why visualization of data is so valuable). On the management side, there is increasing evidence that co-creative processes involving consumers and other stakeholders can have a transformative effect on key processes such as new product development."

"Here’s how it works in data analysis. You put together ad-hoc teams that involve not only analysts with relevant domain expertise but also represent skills from other domains, which brings new ways of thinking to old analytical problems. Over a short two or three day period the team will brainstorm around the problem involved and bring together as much data and as many analytical frameworks as they can to both frame up the problem and outline potential solutions or at least pathways to solutions."

#Social   #Analysts   #DataVisualisation   #Production   #Managers  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Manufacturers Find Business Intelligence Elusive

"Today, as manufacturers seek real-time business information and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems start to push downward into the plant, the need for better production reporting, quality and logistics data is expanding. "With more and faster changeovers in production to support the shift from make-to-stock to make-to-demand, there is a greater need for real-time data," says Colin Masson, research director for manufacturing at AMR Research in Boston. "There is a need to put all real-time operational data, such as asset availability and capability, work in progress, and inventory movements, into a business context.""
....
"Logistics providers such as UPS continue to improve on their freight-tracking capabilities. In September, Atlanta-based UPS launched a new supply chain management tool called Flex Global View. Shippers of goods that use UPS can access the tool directly via a new freight-tracking page at www.ups.com. Using Flex Global View, shippers can send proactive delivery and exception notifications for freight shipments as well as obtain detailed status reports on the customs clearance process."
....
"Visibility into the movement of goods is vital to our customers' success," says Dave Barnes, senior vice president and CIO at Atlanta-based UPS. "Our technology integration efforts are focused on enabling our customers to know with a simple mouse click if their shipment left Europe on a plane or on a ship crossing the Pacific and when it was delivered by truck in Tianjin."
....
"Masson believes manufacturers need a broader operations intelligence platform that embraces more than just production data, but also supply chain and logistics information. "We want to expand the view of real-time data to support operations, not just offer a myopic view of core production information," he says. Unfortunately, the traditional business intelligence view "is looking in the rearview mirror at what happened yesterday," Masson adds."

#Production #OnDemand    #BusinessIntelligence   #Manufacturing   #Logistics     #Transparency   #SaveTime  

Posted by +Daniel Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com
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