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Automating Hamburgers

The Momentum burger-bot ... is more of a burger assembly line. 
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Burger robots may improve consistency and sanitation, and they can knock out a rush like nobody’s business. Momentum’s robot can make a burger in 10 seconds (360/hr). Fast yes, but also superior quality. Because the restaurant is free to spend its savings on better ingredients, it can make gourmet burgers at fast food prices. 
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Earlier this year, McDonalds employees protested outside the fast food chain’s corporate headquarters in Chicago, demanding higher wages. A robotic kitchen might bring improved pay for the front of the house, and a pay cut to zero for the back. Some fraction of the 3.6 million US fast food jobs might be automated by such technology.

#SaveMoney #DisruptiveInnovation   #Automation   #Manufacturing   #Food   #USA  
HT +David Pidsley 

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How the #InternetofThings Is Transforming the Meaning of Product

Citation:
At one point Steve Jobs offered to buy Dropbox, explaining to the founders that their cloud-based file system was really a feature, not a product. In my view Jobs was right with respect to Apple’s definition of a product. But what he failed to understand was that the Internet had fractured the meaning of the word product. Dropbox and many other companies have proved it is possible to build a great business around a simple service. Dropbox may or may not be a product the way Jobs used the word, but it certainly is a business.
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In the industrial sphere, companies that make devices have for decades made large amounts of revenue selling parts and servicing equipment after the sale. Selling parts and offering Break/Fix services are the most basic types of services offered by manufacturers. But now a much larger group of companies is finding that when they connect their devices to the Internet, they have a flow of data about how the product is working and who is using it. As Jim Heppelmann, CEO of PTC puts it, “Vendors no longer have to act as if the products are on the dark side of the moon after they are in use.” The products send lots of data back home to the manufacturer, and this data can be used to create new types of applications that help operate and maintain the devices, but also create value in new and unexpected ways.

Image of Jim Heppelmann, President and CEO of PTC

#InternetofThings   #Manufacturing  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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What the #InternetofThings is really about: data

Citation: The value that comes from connecting your thermostat to the internet isn’t that you can now control it from your smartphone, or that it’s a theoretical home for new ads. The value is that you suddenly have access to cheap information about the temperature of your home, and by collating other data points or simple extrapolation techniques, you also have access to detailed information about what is happening in the home. / #Analytics  

This can be cool. It can be creepy. And it can be convenient. But as is always the case when we encounter technological shifts, the internet of things is really a tool. And like a hammer is used to expand the amount of force generated over a small area (allow you to hit something really hard), the internet of things is a tool is for cheaply delivering and gathering information. / #DataMining  

So sensors on your car should be sending information back to the manufacturer about features you use, and your mechanic about how you are driving and wear and tear on the car’s parts. The manufacturer could then change the car’s design, as Ford has done, while your mechanic can offer you a preventative maintenance contract. Shared over a wider network, you can offer real-time traffic information or even improve weather forecasts by acting as a traveling weather station. But you might also open yourself up to tracking by the government or unscrupulous data-miners seeking to help advertisers establish ever-more-granular demographic profiles. / #Manufacturing    #Demographics   #Privacy   #CentralGovernment  

So if we view this as a tool, then let’s stop talking about the internet of things as this monolithic system that will make homes smarter, businesses leaner, and so on. We need to break this tool down and figure out what information we want and where we can get it. We also need to think about what it can unleash on the world and how to set safeguards. /  #DriveInnovation   #Security  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Gartner Predicts Business Intelligence and Analytics Will Remain Top Focus for CIOs Through 2017

Citation: The CIO focus on business intelligence (BI) and analytics looks set to continue through 2017, according to Gartner, Inc. Gartner said that the benefits of fact-based decision-making are clear to business managers in a broad range of disciplines, including: marketing, sales, supply chain management, manufacturing, engineering, risk management, finance and HR. 

"Major changes are imminent to the world of BI and analytics including the dominance of data discovery techniques, wider use of real-time streaming event data and the eventual acceleration in BI and analytics spending when big data finally matures," said Roy Schulte, vice president and distinguished analyst at Gartner. "As the cost of acquiring, storing and managing data continues to fall, companies are finding it practical to apply BI and analytics in a far wider range of situations."

Gartner outlined four key predictions for BI and analytics:

By 2015, the majority of BI vendors will make data discovery their prime BI platform offering, shifting BI emphasis from reporting-centric to analysis-centric.
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By 2017, more than 50 percent of analytics implementations will make use of event data streams generated from instrumented machines, applications and/or individuals.
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By 2017, analytic applications offered by software vendors will be indistinguishable from analytic applications offered by service providers.
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Until 2016, big data confusion will constrain spending on BI and analytics software to single-digit growth.

#Managers   #Analytics   #BigData   #BusinessIntelligence   #DecisionMaking   #SupplyChain   #Sales   #Manufacturing   #Finance   #HumanRelations   #ReduceRisk  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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#SupplyChain lessons and innovations from the history of #USA brewing industry

Worth a full read.  Paul Lord, a research director at Gartner, provides great examples about #manufacturing , #production , and #marketing  from Ambitious Brew: The Story of American Brew, by Maureen Ogle.

Citation: Beer is an industry that was founded as a chemical manufacturing operation (shipped in kegs and served in taverns) and transformed into a consumer industry dominated by marketing and brand management.  Along the way, the winners applied supply chain fundamentals and innovations to secure their success. / #DriveInnovation  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Nike fires majority of FuelBand team, will stop making wearable hardware

Appears as though Nike is prepping for Apple to come out with its smartwatch by turning its focus to developing software. Example of a partnership wit the purpose of offering better services to customers. Nike's software will focus on #lifelogging  and community engagement.

Citation:
A partnership, say analysts, would be a no-brainer. "Apple is in the hardware business. Nike is in the sneaker business. I don't think Apple sees Nike as competitive. It's likely that an Apple hardware offering would be supportive of the Nike software," Jim Duffy, a Nike analyst with Stifel, Nicolaus & Company, said when speaking with CNET last week. "Nike would be content to let Apple sell devices, as long as they would be supportive of the apps."

#Partnerships   #Manufacturing   #Mobile   #Apps  

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#Manufacturing Industry should follow the EU Conflict Minerals regulations

Citation:
On 5 March 2014, the European Commission (Commission) set forth its long-awaited draft proposal for a new European Union (EU) “system for supply chain due-diligence” for the responsible sourcing of certain minerals [tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold] originating in “conflict affected and high-risk areas.”  The proposal shares some similarities with the provisions of the Conflict Minerals Rule promulgated by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in response to Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act, but differs in many key aspects. / #SupplyChain   #EU   #NaturalResources  
. . . . 
In sharp contrast to Dodd-Frank, the proposed EU regulation is “global in scope” and follows the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Due Diligence Guidelines in this respect.  The draft regulation includes the key phrase: “conflict-affected and high-risk areas.”  These are defined as “… areas in a state of armed conflict, fragile post-conflict as well as areas witnessing weak or non-existent governance and security, such as failed states, and widespread and systematic violations of international law, including human rights abuses.”  Amazingly, it appears that the Responsible Importers who are subject to the rule are the ones who will make the determinations whether countries are “conflict-affected or high-risk areas,” using international templates to help guide business decisions in collaboration with other companies and organizations.  The regulation is intentionally vague on this point to avoid the de facto embargo that Dodd-Frank has created for DRC conflict minerals. / #Globalisation   #Legal   #PreventFraud  
. . . . 
The EU intends to use public procurement options, i.e. its purchasing power, to reward product manufacturers who can demonstrate that their products contain minerals sourced from Responsible Importers.  Thus, in a fashion similar to Dodd-Frank, the EC expects the end-product manufacturer to apply pressure up the supply chain.  The difference is, the importer is the focus of the regulation. / #Purchasing   #PositiveLocalImpact  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Steve Blank's speech on the Next 50 Years of Business Innovation

Much could be excerpted from his commencement speech at ESADE. We found the  serial-entrepreneur's distinctions in the definition of innovation useful.

Citation:
At its most basic, innovation means to introduce something new. But in a business context, the meaning gets more nuanced. I’d like to describe the four types of innovation you can build inside a corporation: / #DriveInnovation  

The first type of corporate innovation is individual initiative. It's exactly as it sounds--you build a corporate culture where anyone can suggest an idea and start a project. Some companies use a suggestion box, others like Google give employees 20 percent of their time to work on their own projects. / #HumanResources  

The second type of business innovation is called process improvement. This is the kind most of us are familiar with. Car companies introduce new models each year, running shoes grow ever lighter and more flexible, Coca-Cola offers a new version of Coke. Smart companies are always looking to make their current products better--and there are many ways to do this. For example they can reduce component cost, introduce a line extension or create new versions of the existing product. These innovations do not require change in a company's existing business model. / #SaveMoney  

This is what companies typically do to secure and defend their core business.

The third type of business innovation--continuous innovation--is much harder. Continuous innovation builds on a strength of the company's current business model but requires that new elements be created. For example, Coke added snack foods, which could be distributed through its existing distribution channels. The Amazon Kindle played on Amazon's strengths as a distributor of content but required developing expertise in electronics and manufacturing. /   #Manufacturing   #Production   #SupplyChain  

Fourth and finally is disruptive innovation. This is the innovation we associate with startups. This type of innovation creates new products or new services that did not exist before. It's the automobile in the 1910's, radio in the 1920's, television in the 1950's, the integrated circuit in the 1960's, the fax machine in the 1970's, personal computers in the 1980's, the Internet in the 1990's, and the Smartphone, human genome sequencing, and even fracking in this decade. These innovations are exactly what Schumpeter and Christensen were talking about. They create new industries and destroy existing ones. And interestingly, in spite of all their resources, large companies are responsible for very, very few disruptive innovations. / #DisruptiveInnovation  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Glimpsing the future of #Manufacturing with Joi Ito

Jon Bruner  interviews Joi Ito, the director of the MIT Media Lab. Ito explains that the "Media Lab’s emphasis is on projects that go all the way to manufacturing and distributing: moving from 'demo or die' to 'deploy or die'". Projects that are deployed can put thousands of devices into the hands of users rather than just a couple. The most creative companies he suggests are the ones that design hardware and software together.
via radar.oreilly.com/2014/04/joi-ito-deploy-or-die.html

At 24 min into the video he recommends that manufacturers become more systems-oriented, using data to consider the impacts of production and the supply chain ecosystem.

Tim O'Reilly comments on G+: "The code that makes sense of it all" is a key #IoT  concept not discussed often enough. (http://goo.gl/AkFm4J)

#Manufacturing   #SupplyChain   #Production   #DriveInnovation   #InternetofThings  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com
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