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Should You Take an App For That?

"Mobile health care apps now number in the thousands on the Apple and Google online stores, and many of these are targeted toward mental health."
. . .
"I think a lot of these mobile digital health technologies would like to take the role of new pharma, which is especially interesting since there hasnt been any new blockbuster drugs for mental health in a while, says John Torous, a psychiatrist at Harvard Medical School and coauthor of the 2015 study."
. . .
"There are also practical issues a feasibility study on an app designed to help manage schizophrenia, found that while users found the app to be effective, the most common technical problem was people forgetting to charge their phones."
. . .
"In the UK, the National Health Services launched a Health Apps Library in March 2013."
. . . 
"Last month, economist Simon Leigh at the University of Liverpool co-authored an article in Evidence Based Mental Health that reported among the 14 apps for depression and anxiety recommended by the NHS, only four had any research to back up their claims and only two of those used validated measurement tools to test their effectiveness."

#Mobile #FutureTechnologies #TodaysChallenge #BuildResilience   #HumanResources   #wellbeing  

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Organizations Within

"[E]ach employee has a whole version of the organization within themselves. While employees are parts of the system objectively, they also embody a system. In other words, any one person from the CEO to the front-line employee, holds within themselves a version of the whole organization. However expansive or limited, that representation is formed of their understandings, associations, experiences, and everyday dealings with others. We posit that these ‘inner organizations’ — when understood in combination — are the most real expression of the organization that one can locate. An organization is best understood through the aggregate levels of human experience. These are the organizational ecosystems.

"In this way, there are no organizational structures, but only practices which, overtime, coalesce into the feeling of a structure through repetition. Thus the most vital intervention into an organization is through these ‘inner organizations’ — and that happens from the inside-out."

#BuildResilience #wellbeing #HumanResources

HT +Inma VP

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Isolated innovators

Where does innovation happen in this age of collaboration? Crowdsourcing and group brainstorming? Are we excluding the potential of individualistic introverts? No, networked communication can connect silos  without forcing open workspaces upon people who need solitude to mull insights. 

"Research strongly suggests that people are more creative when they enjoy privacy and freedom from interruption. And the most spectacularly creative people in many fields are often introverted, according to studies by the psychologists Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi and Gregory Feist. They’re extroverted enough to exchange and advance ideas, but see themselves as independent and individualistic. They’re not joiners by nature."
. . . 
"Solitude has long been associated with creativity and transcendence. “Without great solitude, no serious work is possible,” Picasso said."
. . . 
"Marcel Proust called reading a “miracle of communication in the midst of solitude,” and that’s what the Internet is, too. It’s a place where we can be alone together — and this is precisely what gives it power."

#Innovation #creativity #Collaboration #HumanResources

HT +Rotana Ty cc +David Pidsley 

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Take the Guesswork Out of Talent Decisions With Big Data

Excerpts from Dave Weisbeck, Chief Strategy Officer, Visier

"Supporting and educating managers to make decisions based on data solves only part of the problem in reducing cognitive bias. The first challenge is acquiring the employee data, which often is locked in HR management systems that were never designed for analysis. This is partially because of the way that systems that store employee data have evolved into multiple silos (each function, such as compensation, learning and development, recruiting, and performance management has its own set of transactional data that typically can’t be linked with other systems)."
. . . 
"For most companies, the employee data required for this type of analysis resides not only in the HR management system, but also in many other HR systems, such as recognition, payroll, performance management, and more. Performing this analysis using a standalone, embedded analytics solution (a capability delivered within transactional business applications, such as payroll administration systems) will tell only half the story. Many of these types of solutions cannot link recognition and compensation data, for example."
. . . 
"When a new leadership position opens up, it may be tempting to begin shopping around immediately for new talent outside of the organization. But the first step is to determine who from within the organization would best fill the role: According to a study at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, external hires not only get paid more, but also receive significantly lower marks in performance reviews during their first two years on the job."
. . . 
"In-memory analytics solutions can bring all of these data silos together in one place, enabling business users to address this type of complex and critical people management issue."
. . . 
"With recent advancements in big data technologies, organizations can tap into a unified workforce data ecosystem, uncovering exciting, objective and actionable insights."

#BigData   #HumanResources   #Analytics   #Managers #DecisionMaking   #MasterData  

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Tech to encourage and support employee engagement

"From the ubiquitous, but now updated, employee survey to social media platforms and collaboration tools, technology offers businesses a way to get staff working together, discussing the firm’s mission and bonding socially, all in ways that are quantifiable and observable by management."
. . . 
"For years, the easiest way for companies to figure out how motivated their workers were was to just ask them, usually in infrequent employee surveys or once-a-year reviews. The logic behind this is still sound, but technology now allows firms to do it continuously and less obtrusively with online platforms. Instead of a long survey at the end of the year or a one-off opportunity at the yearly appraisal, staff can give feedback daily or weekly with mini-questionnaires on platforms such as TINYPulse or even just emotional responses – a simple click on a smiley, angry or sad emoticon with software such as Morale.me or emooter. Real-time feedback like this can help companies to pinpoint any problems before they get serious, something that’s particularly useful when the issue is a minor one. If dirty coffee cups in the kitchen are enraging your staff to the point where it’s a distraction, that’s valuable information with an easy fix."

#Social   #TextAnalytics   #HumanResources   #Collaboration   #DecisionMaking   #Collaboration  

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Salesforce Wear opens wearable CRM market, cool

Salesforce is said to be making a "bold and well-timed" move into the "wearables space". In their lineup of supported devices are the Epson Moverio, Jawbone UP, Vuzix M100, Meta Spaceglasses, and Oculus Rift join Pebble, Samsung Gear, Google Glass, Moto360, Myo, and Bionym Nymi band. Some highlights from the article:

Salesforce revealed that FacialNetwork, a HospitalityID app, allows customer service reps wearing smart glasses to identify guests using instant facial recognition technology.
. . . .
ClickSoftware’s ShiftExpert app leverages Samsung Gear II smartwatches to enable employees to clock in and out from shifts, automatically entering the data into timesheets – and sending reminder notifications if the worker is in danger of being late for a shift. 
. . . .
Proximity Insight’s app for Android Wear smartwatches alerts workers when a VIP has come into physical range, allowing retail employees to greet the customer right away.

#DriveInnovation   #Mobile   #Consumerisation   #HumanResources   #Sales  

Posted by +David Pidsley with +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Deep Data: a more ethical and transparent form of Big Data?

Excerpts:
The real problem of big data is that we are increasingly outsourcing our capacity to sense and think to algorithms programmed into machines. While this seems very convenient and cool at first and offers access to services that many of us want, it also raises a question about who actually owns big data, about the rights of individuals and citizens to own their personal data and to exercise choices regarding its use.
. . . 
Deep data is used to make people and communities see themselves. Deep data functions like a mirror: it makes you see yourself--both as an individual and as a community. Over the past twenty years of my professional life I have been helping teams and organizations go through processes of profound innovation and transformative change across sectors and cultures. The one thing that I have learned from all these projects is that the key to transformative change is to make the system see itself. That's why deep data matters. It matters to the future of our institutions, our societies, and our planet.
. . .
But what happens today with big data often is the opposite: big data is used to manipulate our behavior, to bombard us with commercials that we never asked for. Surface big data is used to outsource human thinking to algorithms, to reduce our level of awareness inside the boundaries of habitual thought.  Deep data, if developed and cultivated in the right way, could help us to enhance the level of awareness and consciousness and to change the system by shifting the consciousness of stakeholders in that system from ego-system awareness (awareness of my own silo) to eco-system awareness (awareness of the whole).

#PositiveLocalImpact   #DriveInnovation   #Globalisation   #HumanResources   #BigData   #Transparency   #Wellbeing  
The journey from science 1.0 to 2.0 is a journey of bending the beam of scientific observation back onto the observing self--both individually and collectively. #nemetics This is a nemetical approach to deep sensing.

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Job hunting the big data way

Recruiting firms are looking beyond the CV to how their applicants write sentences. Through text analytics they are making a better fit between company cultures and applicant personalities. They can also predict how long an employee is likely to stay with a job before moving on!  / #HumanResources   #TextAnalytics   #DataMining  

Citation: Nearly half of new recruits turn out to be duds within 18 months, according to one study, while two-thirds of hiring managers admit they've often chosen the wrong people. / #TodaysChallenges  
. . . 
"[I]nnovative personality tests are supplements to, not replacements for, big data analytics, many recruiters believe. / #BigData  
. . . 
Analysis of historic data from tens of millions of job applicants, successful or otherwise, is helping employers predict which new candidates are likely to be the best based on a comparison with the career paths, personalities and qualifications of previously successful employees. / #Analysts  

"Now we're able to use our own data to track how long candidates stay in a role before seeking new opportunities," says Geoff Smith, managing director of recruitment consultancy Experis. / #PredictiveAnalytics  
. . . 
San Francisco-based company Evolv found that long-term unemployed people perform no worse than those who have had more regular work.

It also found that prior work experience and even education are not necessarily indicators of good performance in some roles. / #Education  
. . . 
Our blogs, websites, Twitter rants and LinkedIn profiles reveal as much - if not more - about us than a semi-fictionalised CV.

"The days of keeping your personal and professional profiles separate are over," warns Experis's Geoff Smith.

"Social media is a great platform for individuals to demonstrate their expertise, experience and enthusiasm for their field of specialism. However, candidates need to be conscious of the online reputation they are building and the data trail they are leaving behind." / #Social  

Posted by +Dan Durrant w/ +David Pidsley 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Superforecasters

Philip Tetlock's Good Judgment Project, which begun in 2011, aims to find better ways to see into the future. Along with two other psychologists, Don Moore and Barbara Mellers, Tetlock's team have been running experiments with the co-operation of an army of volunteers that includes both amateurs with no forecasting experience and professionals with a background in intelligence analysis, think-tanks or academia. The participants received training in forecasting, and some of them were found to be “superforecasters” who can predict geopolitical events with an accuracy far outstripping chance. 

Citation: Barbara Mellers told me that the thinking style most associated with making better forecasts was something psychologists call “actively open-minded thinking”. A questionnaire to diagnose this trait invites people to rate their agreement or disagreement with statements such as, “Changing your mind is a sign of weakness.” The project found that successful forecasters aren’t afraid to change their minds, are happy to seek out conflicting views and are comfortable with the notion that fresh evidence might force them to abandon an old view of the world and embrace something new.
. . .
So what is the secret of looking into the future? Initial results from the Good Judgment Project suggest the following approaches. First, some basic training in probabilistic reasoning helps to produce better forecasts. Second, teams of good forecasters produce better results than good forecasters working alone. Third, actively open-minded people prosper as forecasters.

But the Good Judgment Project also hints at why so many experts are such terrible forecasters. It’s not so much that they lack training, teamwork and open-mindedness – although some of these qualities are in shorter supply than others. It’s that most forecasters aren’t actually seriously and single-mindedly trying to see into the future. If they were, they’d keep score and try to improve their predictions based on past errors. They don’t.

#AnticipateChange   #HumanResources  cc +David Pidsley 

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"Work-force science, in short, is what happens when Big Data meets H.R."

Some great examples in the whole article. 

Citation: These are some of the startling findings of an emerging field called work-force science. It adds a large dose of data analysis, a k a Big Data, to the field of human resource management, which has traditionally relied heavily on gut feel and established practice to guide hiring, promotion and career planning.
. . . 
In the past, studies of worker behavior were typically based on observing a few hundred people at most. Today, studies can include thousands or hundreds of thousands of workers, an exponential leap ahead.

#BigData   #HumanResources   #Managers  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com
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