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Operational Resilience through Managing External Dependencies

Citation: These days, organizations are rarely self-contained. Businesses collaborate through partnerships and close links with suppliers and customers. Outsourcing services and business processes, including into Cloud Computing, means that key operations that an organization depends on are often fulfilled outside their control.

The challenge here is how to manage the dependencies your operations have on factors that are outside your control. The goal is to perform your risk management so it optimizes your operational success through being resilient against external dependencies.
. . . 
The Open Group’s Dependency Modeling (O-DM) helps you to plan for success through operational resilience, assured business continuity, and effective new controls and contingencies, enabling you to:

- Cut costs without losing capability
- Make the most of tight budgets
- Build a resilient supply chain
 - Lead programs and projects to success
- Measure, understand and manage risk from outsourcing relationships and supply chains
- Deliver complex event analysis

#SupplyChain   #Managers   #BuildResilience   #SaveMoney   #Partnerships    #Cloud  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Some of the basic benefits of #BusinessIntelligence

Citation Mix:
With today’s BI tools, business folks can jump in and start analyzing data themselves, rather than wait for IT to run complex reports. This democratization of information access helps users back up—with hard numbers—business decisions that would otherwise be based only on gut feelings and anecdotes. / #DecisionMaking   #SelfService   #InformationTechnology  
. . . 
Sharing is vital to the success of BI projects, because everyone involved in the process must have full access to information to be able to change the ways that they work. BI projects should start with top executives, but the next group of users should be salespeople. Because their job is to increase sales and because they’re often compensated on their ability to do so, they’ll be more likely to embrace any tool that will help them do just that—provided, of course, the tool is easy to use and they trust the information. / #Collaboration   #Executives   #Sales  
. . . 
A broad range of applications for BI has helped companies rack up impressive ROI figures. Business intelligence has been used to identify cost-cutting ideas, uncover business opportunities, roll ERP data into accessible reports, react quickly to retail demand and optimize prices. / #SaveMoney #GrowIncome

Besides making data accessible, BI software can give companies more leverage during negotiations by making it easier to quantify the value of relationships with suppliers and customers. / #SupplyChain   #Purchasing  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Value nets: 21C #SupplyChain
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=872787

Citation: A value net is a dynamic network of customer/supplier partnerships and information flows. It is activated by real customer demand and is capable of responding rapidly and reliably to customer preferences. A value net is so named because it creates value for all of its participants – company, suppliers, and customers – and because these participants operate within a collaborative, digitally linked network.

For companies that design their businesses around it, a value net is a practical strategy for providing what so many Internet-age consumers and business customers now demand: customized products, fast order fulfillment, and products bundled with services they value. Customers’ expectations are growing relentlessly, fueled by the Internet’s “click it and get it” proposition in industries as diverse as prescription drugs, custom-built furniture, pick-your-tunes music, and home-delivered groceries. Yet the performance of many companies, both dot-com start-ups and traditional incumbents alike, falls far short of expectations.

The problem lies in the traditional supply chain. Being linear, slow, and rigid, the supply chain can only guess at customer demand and then attempt to satisfy it with standardized products and average service. Materials move sequentially down the chain, where hand-offs, bottlenecks, and buffer stocks are commonplace. Information moves erratically, and customers are seldom in the loop. Speed and performance improvements are possible within this rigid, sequential system, but only at the margins. And because they are driven by forecasted demand, not real demand, inventories build up at every link in the chain (see Exhibit 2).
. . . .
A value net unlocks this rusty old supply chain. Based on a 1999 Mercer Management Consulting study of 30 companies in North America, Europe, and Asia, we find that value net companies share five characteristics:

(1) Customer-aligned. Customer choice triggers sourcing, building, and delivery activities within the company and its supplier network.
(2) Collaborative. Companies engage suppliers and customers in networks of value-creating relationships. Each activity is assigned to the partner best able to perform it.
(3) Agile and scalable. Responsiveness to change is assured through flexible production, distribution, and information flows. Brick-and-mortar restraints and capital requirements are minimized. By design, the enterprise can easily be scaled to meet shifts in demand.
(4) Fast flow. Order-to-delivery cycles are compressed. Inventories are negligible. Delivery dates are extremely reliable. The finished-goods stock room is an express delivery truck.
(5) Digital. Information systems form the neural backbone of the net, connecting customers, suppliers, and value-adding activities.

#Collaboration   #Partnerships   #Globalisation   #BusinessIntelligence   #BuildResilience   #Retail  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com
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Gartner Predicts Business Intelligence and Analytics Will Remain Top Focus for CIOs Through 2017

Citation: The CIO focus on business intelligence (BI) and analytics looks set to continue through 2017, according to Gartner, Inc. Gartner said that the benefits of fact-based decision-making are clear to business managers in a broad range of disciplines, including: marketing, sales, supply chain management, manufacturing, engineering, risk management, finance and HR. 

"Major changes are imminent to the world of BI and analytics including the dominance of data discovery techniques, wider use of real-time streaming event data and the eventual acceleration in BI and analytics spending when big data finally matures," said Roy Schulte, vice president and distinguished analyst at Gartner. "As the cost of acquiring, storing and managing data continues to fall, companies are finding it practical to apply BI and analytics in a far wider range of situations."

Gartner outlined four key predictions for BI and analytics:

By 2015, the majority of BI vendors will make data discovery their prime BI platform offering, shifting BI emphasis from reporting-centric to analysis-centric.
. . . .
By 2017, more than 50 percent of analytics implementations will make use of event data streams generated from instrumented machines, applications and/or individuals.
. . . 
By 2017, analytic applications offered by software vendors will be indistinguishable from analytic applications offered by service providers.
. . 
Until 2016, big data confusion will constrain spending on BI and analytics software to single-digit growth.

#Managers   #Analytics   #BigData   #BusinessIntelligence   #DecisionMaking   #SupplyChain   #Sales   #Manufacturing   #Finance   #HumanRelations   #ReduceRisk  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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The “internet of things” may not always need an internet connection

Citation: If you need 40,000 transistors on a chip, you’re better off going to ARM or one of the other more established chip-designers. But if your needs are more basic—a couple of hundred to a couple of thousand—then printed circuitry should do the trick.
. . . .
Using NFC, your bag of lettuce could signal to your smart fridge that it’s past its best. The uses for these simple, single-purpose electronics are endless. Clothes in stores could be fitted with reliable, discreet anti-theft trackers. Readable electronics on visitor badges at hospitals or universities could allow access to those with the right clearance. A tag on a perishable or valuable shipment could ensure it remains at a consistent temperature.

#InternetofThings #SupplyChain

Posted by +Dan Durrant

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Rising Oil Prices Loom Over World Economic Recovery

Citation: The global economy faces a new threat from an old enemy: oil. A spike in the price of crude foreshadowed economic slumps in each of the last four decades. So economists are worrying because the price of Brent crude, considered the benchmark for the industry, recently reached its highest point in nine months—above $115 a barrel. The jump in price came amid fresh violence in Iraq, the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries’ second-biggest producer after Saudi Arabia. Brent started the year about $6 cheaper.
. . . 
There is no doubt that, beyond a certain point, higher prices become a major constraint on global economic activity, particularly if the price reflects supply problems, rather than buoyant demand,” says Julian Jessop, chief global economist at Capital Economics in London. 
. . .
Capital Economics suggests there is a 20 percent risk of the fighting in Iraq pushing oil up to $120, which it says is the danger point: That price is associated with previous global economic slowdowns. “What’s more,” says Jessop, “a strong and sustained recovery seems unlikely as long as oil is above $100.”

#NaturalResources   #SupplyChain   #BlackSwanEvent   #Globalisation  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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25 Questions You Didn’t Know Business Intelligence Could Answer for Your Business

The 25 questions are helpful for #Executives   #HumanResources   #SupplyChain   #Marketing  &  #Sales . It also references some interesting stuff about BI adoption from the 2014 annual Business Intelligence Gleansight Benchmark report.  For example, the executive level demand for data-driven decisions (92%), is said to be the top reason that the highest performing organisations had for implementing #BusinessIntelligence .

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Addressing improper payment risk in government contracts

Citation: Whatever their cause, improper payments—that is, overpayments, underpayments, payments made without substantiation, or payments otherwise involving fraud, waste, abuse or errors—are in the government’s crosshairs as never before. / #PreventFraud   #CentralGovernment  
. . . . 
To address the increasing risks associated with improper payments, government contractors and other businesses can implement their own high-tech analytical and monitoring program focused on payments they receive from the government, as well as payments they make to subcontractors, whether or not as part of a government contract. A clearer understanding of the tools involved – and the types of expertise needed to use them effectively – can help contractors and other businesses decide which might be most helpful in their operations. /   #Partnerships #ReduceRisk    #ProfessionalServices   #SupplyChain  
. . . . 
Predictive analytics is a methodology utilizing machine learning and statistics to analyze historical and current data to predict future actions and events. Using advanced analytics and algorithms, such as econometric models, neural networks, decision trees and self-organizing maps, data can be mined for trends, patterns and behavior that will provide, for example, indicators of anomalous activity that go beyond rule-based detection. In short, one variable, or a number of variables acting in concert, are analyzed to assess whether a relationship exists with other variables of interest. / #PredictiveAnalytics  

Potential benefits of predictive analytics include:
- Accelerated identification of anomalous activity early in the process
- Reduced false positives and increased accuracy regarding suspected
behaviors
- Ability to incorporate updated information and findings to continually refine the predictive model
- Ability to identify new schemes or patterns without prior knowledge
. . . . 
It is possible to combine the best attributes of data analytics, continuous monitoring and predictive analytics into an even more effective approach. Essentially, the elements of past, present and future can be viewed and analyzed in one hybrid fraud detection framework. This affords an organization even deeper insight into the nature of its payments and the effectiveness of its operations. / #AnticipateChange  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Data scientists are in demand for #Logistics projects

James A. Cooke, a journalist covering logistics, writes:

Although computers and software are powerful tools for facilitating analysis, a human expert is still needed to make decisions about what data to examine and how. "Data science is not a one-size-fits-all approach," says Larry Snyder, an associate professor at Lehigh University and co-author of the book Fundamentals of Supply Chain Theory. "So you can't just throw terabytes of data into an off-the-shelf system and ask it, 'What should I do?' It takes data and decision-making experts to convert raw data into useable information and ultimately, to make decisions." / #DecisionMaking #SupplyChain 
. . . .
Because so much raw information abounds in logistics, the discipline is considered to be particularly well suited to big data analysis. Logistics, by its nature, involves numerous data exchanges between multiple partners to make the supply chain flow, and there are piles of raw data sitting in all of those partners' systems. But it's not just traditional data systems that provide fodder for analysis. Big data analysis can encompass information gathered by sensors—say, on trucks or on packages in the warehouse. / #Logistics   #BigData   #InternetofThings  

The premise behind big data analysis is that if correlations can be made between all that raw data, users can gain a better understanding of why things happen and parlay those insights into process improvements. "Getting to root causes often requires analyzing data to understand correlations—what is related to what," says John Hagerty, a program director for big data at IBM. / #Analysts  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Urbanization will drive more logistics spending

Citation: Over the course of just one decade, spending on logistics in urban areas will more than double, according to a new report (2013) from Frost & Sullivan's Visionary Innovation Group. The research firm forecasts that urban logistics expenditures will increase from $2.55 trillion in 2010 to $5.98 trillion by 2020. / #Logistics  
. . . .
By 2025, the report predicts, three out of five people will live in urban areas, and there will be 35 "mega cities" across the globe. Those cities are expected to have a minimum of 500 million daily deliveries. "To meet that kind of volume, logistics companies must consolidate their delivery and [segment] their fleets," said Frost & Sullivan Senior Research Analyst Archana Vidyasekar. "Companies will also adopt innovative last-mile options, such as the use of self-collection locker boxes or 'lifestyle couriers' where people volunteer to deliver goods." / #Urbanisation   #DriveInnovation  
. . . .
The report said that by 2025, consumers will have multiple connected devices that will provide them with an "omnichannel touch point" with suppliers, making it possible to order goods from anywhere at any time. As technology becomes more proactive and connectivity influences every stage of supply chain activity, logistics will have to become agile enough to provide spontaneous, "on the move" deliveries. "Route planning and scheduling will become imperative," Vidyasekar said. Technologies like traffic-predicting tools, RFID tags, GPS devices, road sensors, bar codes, geofencing, and location-based tracking will help companies optimize trips and ensure they are going as planned. In cases of unexpected disruptions, on-board vehicle telematics will allow deliveries to be redirected or rescheduled, she added. / #SupplyChain   #InternetofThings   #PredictiveAnalytics   #GeoData   #Maps  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com
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