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How to Use Big Data to Enhance Your Brand Storytelling

"By now, many businesses and organizations have seen the value behind big data."
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"You see, big data by itself actually holds little value."
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"To truly gain value and improve your brand, data needs to be used in storytelling."
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"Without data, stories like the ones you want to tell provide little impact."
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"Storytelling can effectively establish that emotional connection, while data within the story can help earn the trust of the reader.
Enhancing your brand storytelling with big data should also be focused on creating a dialogue."
. . . 
"Through better brand storytelling with big data, organizations will be able to not only inspire content that will be shared, but they’ll be considered some of the top thought leaders in their respective industries."

#Storytelling #BigData

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The Inexorable March in the Quantification of Me

Great post by +Julian Stodd 

Wearable technology will transform every aspect of everything we do.

"It will geolocate and contextualise information depending upon who you are with, where you are and what you are doing.

"It will help you achieve that thing you are doing by both pulling in new information and letting you share your story as you learn.

It will move us from formal, abstract, old world models of learning to ‘on demand‘ learning and performance support fit for the Social Age.

"It will ground our learning in facts of performance and support us in changing those facts."

#Lifelogging #Social #OnDemand #Storytelling  

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New on the Anticipate Change Blog: Data Storytelling for Disruptors

"Disruptive innovations have become common in these 'postnormal' times. Organisations that seek to be disruptive are fusing big data analytics with storytelling to nurture better business cultures. Narratives and data stories encourage participation in innovation. We share our recent experience and insights into data storytelling and disruptive innovation."

#AnticipateChange   #BigData   #Storytelling   #DriveInnovation   #DisruptiveInnovation   #Analysts   #SelfService  

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

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The Storytelling Mandate of Big Data

Excerpt:
We collect data and use data effectively to enhance our experiences and tell stories, says Ramesh Jain, a UC Irvine professor and big data researcher. “But this requires understanding relationships among disparate data items. And that is where the importance of Big Data really lies,” Jain writes on his blog.

Data-powered storytelling can be broken down into two categories: micro stories and macro stories. In their 2013 piece on the topic, Jain and Microsoft researcher Malcolm Stanley theorize that micro stories can be as simple as clicking the “like” button on Facebook, posting a picture on Instagram, or posting a video on YouTube. “Micro stories reflect a person’s experience with just one small event–really a moment in the event,” they write.

Mega stories can be generated by combining micro stories into a bigger narrative. “Mega stories tell a story that could only be created by considering a large volume of relevant events in big data,” Jain and Stanley write. “All these events must be selected and aggregated based on the goal of the storyteller.”

#Social   #Storytelling   #BigData  

Featured in Data Storytelling for Disruptors
http://blog.causeanalytics.com/2014/10/data-storytelling-for-disruptors.html 

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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How to Tell Stories with Data (Really)

Here's an interesting talk by Edward Segel at the January 2012 KDMC digital storytelling workshop. He shares insights from his paper (written in collaboration with Jeffrey Heer) entitled Narrative Visualization: Telling Stories with Data. See here: http://vis.stanford.edu/papers/narrative

He begins by explaining the growth of data and how no one knows what to do with it all because it's simply too much. Data visualisation is said to make patterns in the data "perceptively digestible." He mentions four motivations behind the creation of "interactive visualisations": 1) for displaying an extensive analysis; 2) for personalisation to increase user's emotional engagement with a data set; 3) for showing a wide array of social responses and opinions; 4) for storytelling that guides users through the data in ways he fully describes in his talk. He then delves into the findings of his paper.

#DataVisualisation   #Storytelling   #Analysts   #Social  

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Our postnormal times

An excellent overview of our "postnormal times" written in 2010 by Ziauddin Sardar, a London-based scholar called "Britain's own Muslim polymath" by The Independent newspaper. In these times of ours the power to #AnticipateChange  is essential, but also extremely difficult.

Excerpts:
All that was ‘normal’ has now evaporated; we have entered postnormal times, the in between period where old orthodoxies are dying, new ones have not yet emerged, and nothing really makes sense. To have any notion of a viable future, we must grasp the significance of this period of transition which is characterized by three c’s: complexity, chaos and contradictions. These forces propel and sustain postnormal times leading to uncertainty and different types of ignorance that make decision-making problematic and increase risks to individuals, society and the planet.  / #DecisionMaking  
. . . 
Welcome to postnormal times. It’s a time when little out there can be trusted or gives us confidence. The espiritu del tiempo, the spirit of our age, is characterised by uncertainty, rapid change, realignment of power, upheaval and chaotic behaviour. We live in an in-between period where old orthodoxies are dying, new ones have yet to be born, and very few things seem to make sense.  / #TodaysChallenges   #BlackSwanEvents  
. . . 
...globalisation enhances complexity not simply by making us interdependent but also by increasing our interconnections. In a globalised world, everything is connected to everything else. / #Globalisation  
. . . 
We are more connected and interconnected than any other time in history. The entire globe is a network criss-crossed by networks of individuals, groups, communities, institutions constantly connected to each other by e-mails, e-lists, internet newsgroups, mobile phones, text, video conferencing, blogs, twitter, facebook, myspace, interactive digital television and 24-h news broadcasts. There is hardly a place in the world where we can be alone. The mobile phone in your pocket tells those who want to know exactly where you are and enables you to communicate with any one at any time (almost) anywhere. More and more, communication is becoming instant, all encompassing, and ever present. Indeed, it seems that nowadays we do not communicate to live; but live to communicate. / #Social   #Mobile  
. . . 
It is now fashionable to argue that we are going through unprecedented change. Things have\always changed but they have not changed with the accelerating pace we are witnessing nowadays. Take, for example, information technology, which doubles its power, as measured in price, performance and bandwidth capacity, every year. In 25 years, it would have multiplied by a factor of a billion as we move from transistors to more powerful technologies such as nanotechnology or molecular computing.  / #InformationTechnology   #FutureTechnologies  
. . . 
In postnormal conditions, flexibility, adaptation and sensitivity to markedly different initial conditions require that we develop our ethical acuity to increase the diversity of our response. We are not looking for one solution but many alternatives which create positive feedback and momentum for common principles. Such an approach demands new thinking, effort and participation by everyone. / #Storytelling  

Featured in Data Storytelling for Disruptors
http://blog.causeanalytics.com/2014/10/data-storytelling-for-disruptors.html 

Source: http://goo.gl/Sko4JO
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Data visualisation success hinges on solid storytelling skills

Excerpt:
Data by itself is fairly useless without solid storytelling and narrative skills, according to Jock Mackinlay. Mackinlay is director of visual analysis at Tableau. He's an alumnus of UC Berkeley and Stanford University and a veteran of Xerox PARC. He is also known for coining the term "information visualization" in his 1999 book Readings in Information Visualization: Using Vision to Think.

Accessible Storytelling
"Once you have some understanding of your data you have to tell another human. First there is analysis and then there is storytelling. And they blend back together. The classic way of doing this is traditional business intelligence (BI), but that is slow for organisations to do. There is the whole chain of data warehousing [and] getting IT to build reports. Business users should not have to find a statistician or programmer when data is becoming democratised within organisations -- who are increasingly encouraging employees at all levels to use and interpret data."
. . . 
"Data scientists are valuable but if you become dependent, then it is like being dependent on IT again. Our focus is on the data enthusiast, partly because of the nature of our technology. We want to empower the data enthusiasts so they can get along by themselves."

#Storytelling   #DataVisualisation     #SelfService     #BusinessIntelligence   #DataWarehouse   #InformationTechnology    

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Fusing Narrative with Analytic Thinking

+Stephen Denning writes,
"Analytic, abstract thinking is ideal for reporting the regular, the expected, the normal, the ordinary, the unsurprising, the mundane, the things we often take so much for granted that we are hardly conscious that we know them at all.

"By contrast, narrative thinking, encapsulated in stories and storytelling, is ideally suited to discussing the exceptional. Narrative thrives on the disruptions from the ordinary, the unexpected, the conflicts, the deviations, the surprises, the unusual. Stories flourish in the overthrow of the existing order by some event or thought that changes our perspective. Stories derive their power from a violation of the normal and the legitimate and the ordinary, which in turn generates the fear and curiosity and excitement which we all feel when listening to a good new story. In this way, stories appeal not only to the mental process of the brain, but are grounded in the feelings of the listener. They thus appeal to both the mind and the heart.
. . . 
"Storytelling doesn’t replace analytical thinking. It supplements it by enabling us to imagine new perspectives and new worlds, and is ideally suited to communicating change and stimulating innovation. Abstract analysis is easier to understand when seen through the lens of a well-chosen story and can of course be used to make explicit the implications of a story. The Springboard does not recommend abandoning abstract thinking, nor does it suggest that we should give up the advances that have emerged through experimentation and science. It discusses the discovery of the power of storytelling and the mechanisms by which it operates, thus remedying the neglect of storytelling, but not so as to jettison analytic thinking. It proposes marrying the communicative and imaginative strengths of storytelling with the advantages of abstract and scientific analysis."

#Storytelling   #DriveInnovation  

Featured in Data Storytelling for Disruptors
http://blog.causeanalytics.com/2014/10/data-storytelling-for-disruptors.html 

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New blog: Could lifelogging address the educational "achievement gap" while preparing children from all backgrounds to work with data? Securing personal data from unwelcome eyes will likely remain a challenge. Lifelogging is not just about quantitative analysis. Highly engaging, qualitative storytelling can also emerge from data gathered by learners. Stories of self-determination would involve the learner's own understanding of personal ambitions and dreams.

#Education #AchievementGap #DriveInnovation #Lifelogging  #Storytelling #QuantifiedSelf

By +Dan Durrant 
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