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Deep Data: a more ethical and transparent form of Big Data?

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The real problem of big data is that we are increasingly outsourcing our capacity to sense and think to algorithms programmed into machines. While this seems very convenient and cool at first and offers access to services that many of us want, it also raises a question about who actually owns big data, about the rights of individuals and citizens to own their personal data and to exercise choices regarding its use.
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Deep data is used to make people and communities see themselves. Deep data functions like a mirror: it makes you see yourself--both as an individual and as a community. Over the past twenty years of my professional life I have been helping teams and organizations go through processes of profound innovation and transformative change across sectors and cultures. The one thing that I have learned from all these projects is that the key to transformative change is to make the system see itself. That's why deep data matters. It matters to the future of our institutions, our societies, and our planet.
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But what happens today with big data often is the opposite: big data is used to manipulate our behavior, to bombard us with commercials that we never asked for. Surface big data is used to outsource human thinking to algorithms, to reduce our level of awareness inside the boundaries of habitual thought.  Deep data, if developed and cultivated in the right way, could help us to enhance the level of awareness and consciousness and to change the system by shifting the consciousness of stakeholders in that system from ego-system awareness (awareness of my own silo) to eco-system awareness (awareness of the whole).

#PositiveLocalImpact   #DriveInnovation   #Globalisation   #HumanResources   #BigData   #Transparency   #Wellbeing  
The journey from science 1.0 to 2.0 is a journey of bending the beam of scientific observation back onto the observing self--both individually and collectively. #nemetics This is a nemetical approach to deep sensing.

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Missions and Metrics

Citation Mix:
As the old adage goes, what gets measured gets managed.

The standard metric for a country's economic welfare is GDP. I find this strange. If the government decided to give millions of dollars to the country's richest people so that they can buy yachts from one another, that would increase GDP. So would clearcutting our national forests to build strip malls, outsourcing the raising of our children, and incarcerating large swaths of our poor.

If we temper the language a bit, we might find that this description is not so far from reality.

My point is that metrics shape behavior. Joseph Stiglitz describes this mechanism nicely: "What we gather our information about, and how we describe success, affects what we strive for." Political leaders who want to grow the economy, he says, will focus policies on things that increase GDP, even when GDP does not correlate with societal well-being.
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It is useful, therefore, to have missions to balance our metrics. Of course, each tool should have its own mission. But if I were to suggest one mission for all tools, it might be this:

Every tool should nourish the things upon which it depends.

#Consumerisation   #DriveInnovation   #Wellbeing   #PositiveLocalImpact   #CentralGovernment  

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Vision of Humanity brings peace research to life, with interactive peace maps, ground breaking reports and the very latest news and videos pertaining to peace.

#Maps   #PositiveLocalImpact   #Transparency  

Posted by +Dan Durrant w/ +David Pidsley 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Effective Mantras of #OpenData: http://goo.gl/I0bAZX

"Modern day information-savvy constituents are expecting increased transparency from the government by demanding open government data. Open Data means data which can be freely used, re-used, and re-distributed. For example, finance data, health data, data on civil servants and politicians."  / #Transparency   #CentralGovernment  
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The Literacy Challenge of Open Data: http://goo.gl/YTJMfG

"We need a data-literate citizenry, not just a small elite of hackers and policy wonks. And the best way to cultivate that broad-based literacy is not to release in small or measured quantities, but to flood us with data. To provide thousands of niches that will interest people in learning, playing and working with open data. But more than this we also need to think about cultivating communities where citizens can exchange ideas as well as involve educators to help provide support and increase people’s ability to move up the learning curve." / #PositiveLocalImpact   #Education  
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Data entrepreneurs vs. national debt

Julie Meyer writes,

There is no sensible public discourse with real numbers which have been verified and released to the public showing whether the balance sheet of the UK (or any other G8 economy for that matter) is bust, in the red, black, and in which direction it's moving.

As a result:

The public doesn't understand the difference between the deficit and the public debt.

Spending pots come and go, and people make emotional pleas for spending without having any clue whether the country can afford it or not.
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If the governments of the G8 aren't showing the books to the citizenry because we're bust (rather than they don't know how to do this, or they are being patrionising), then they should be at least signalling mightily strongly that a new accountability is emerging where big government is being replaced by rising people power working through tech-enabled collectives. Crowdfunding will get people addicted – I believe even obsessed – with their money going directly to the causes that they care about – whether that's eliminating homelessness in Earls' Court Road, or building state of the art hospitals, or beefing up the military.
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The more the man on the street understands how technology and finance are changing his daily life and habits, the more he can decide where to play on the continuum of risk and reward and to feel good that he is in charge of his destiny and dignity.
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Your data – whether health, financial, telecoms, retail – is yours. There is a value to it as multi-billion pound businesses are built using it as a central piece of the transaction in their business model. Similarly, the state protects this data through regulation and services today. But the real economy always moves faster than government and the cracks emerge quickly. The most effective, responsive, fast way of lifting up, enabling and protecting the weakest or most vulnerable in society will be that the assets that they have are understood by them and returning them value directly.
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Technology and finance will be the friend of Joe citizen. Bitcoin, crowdfunding, peer to peer lending, social insurance, cashback deals, moneydashboards and family finance solutions will transform the world we live in over the next decade. They change everything. Technology-fueled financial services which are tied to backing the individual and enabling the industrialist is the most exciting sandbox to play in as the impact is the most significant.

#Debt   #Transparency   #Entrepreneurs   #DriveInnovation #PositiveLocalImpact    #UK   #Finance  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

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Employers’ Challenge to Educators: Make School Relevant to Students’ Lives

Citation: At the recent Next New World conference hosted by New York Times columnist Tom Friedman, panelists addressed the question of how the American education system can better prepare students to meet the evolving challenges of the 21st century economy.
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“The problem is not to get incrementally better with our current education system,” said Tony Wagner, expert in residence at Harvard’s Innovation Lab. “The problem is to reimagine it.” Wagner is not the first to call for a  make-over of the education system, and he certainly isn’t the first to advocate for content that connects with students in authentic ways or that teaches real world skills. His voice joins with the countless educators clamoring for the freedom to pursue those same goals.
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Wagner half-jokingly advocated for “Dream Directors” in schools, whose job it would be to help students identify their dreams and scaffold tasks to help students obtain the skills needed for that dream. Over time attention to the needs of individuals would transform the content and delivery methods in schools.
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If parents, students and teachers make their voices heard about what true accountability would look like, they could change the conversation. But the bottom-up strategy will only work, Wagner said, if it’s accompanied by business leaders clearly articulating the outcomes they’d like to see and helping align accountability to those outcomes.
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“We need teachers and parents to advocate for a better system,” Wagner said. And perhaps most importantly, student need a voice as education goes through major changes. “We’re not asking students at all about what they think about the quality of their own learning and about what they aspire to learn,” Wagner said.
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“Its purpose is to produce education innovators,” said Richard Miller, president and professor at Olin College. The Massachusetts college is an education laboratory. There are no departments, no tenure, no tuition and the curriculum has an expiration date so that it stays relevant.

“Olin is essentially a ‘maker’ university,” Miller said. In one class, students are asked to identify a group of people whose lives they want to change. Through research and interviews they develop a sociological profile of the group that is used to come up with two to three systems, devices or technologies that don’t already exist and that the group says would make a difference in their lives. Students then develop the specifications for the product and show how to build it. By the end of the course they have the outline for a patent.

#DriveInnovation #Education #HumanResources #PositiveLocalImpact #Entrepreneurs

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Want To Attract Millennials To Your Company? Engage Them In Causes

Citation: [In the the 5th Millennial Impact Report] out of 1,514 respondents, more than 50% said that a company's involvement in various causes influenced whether they accepted a job. 
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Once millennials have decided to work at a company, they're more likely to stick around if they feel that their passions are fulfilled -- and if they believe in the company's mission. "It's interesting how cause-related work has morphed from a little side thing, in terms of a company’s thinking, into something that could--and hopefully will--become one of the strongest tools in the arsenal for recruiting," says  Emily Yu, the Case Foundation's vice president of partnerships.

#Demographics   #HumanResources   #PositiveLocalImpact  

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Transforming giants: Building resilience

Leadership expert and Harvard Business School professor, Rosabeth Moss Kanter, wrote Transforming giants for HBR in 2008, in which she argued that even profit-seeking behemoths can become agile while having a positive local impact upon their communities. It remains relevant today.

Citation: The common perception was that profit-seeking behemoths were dysfunctional. They were written off as lumbering, inflexible, reactive, and inherently bureaucratic—as systems so closed they had lost the ability to see the problems in the world around them, let alone be part of the solutions. Yet talk to the leaders of some of the world’s biggest companies today, and you hear a different story. They’re claiming new abilities to shift organizational gears on a global basis and produce meaningful innovations quickly.
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Employees once acted mainly according to rules and decisions handed down to them, but they now draw heavily on their shared understanding of mission and on a set of tools available everywhere at once. They more readily think about the meaning of what they do in terms of the wider world and include external partners in the extended family. Authority is still exercised and activities are still coordinated—but thanks to common platforms, standardized processes, and, above all, widely shared values and standards, coherence now arises more spontaneously. This shift is often heralded, and in most of these companies it has been a long time coming. But now it is happening with dramatic effects.

hbr.org/2008/01/transforming-giants/ar/1
image via: http://leadershipbeyondlimits.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Transforming_Giants_hbr.pdf

#BuildResilience   #DriveInnovation   #Partnerships   #PositiveLocalImpact  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com
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Big Data for Social Innovation

#PositiveLocalImpact
#BigData   
#DriveInnovation  
Nonprofits and other social change organizations are lagging their counterparts in the scientific and business communities in collecting and analyzing the vast amounts of data that are being generated by digital technology. Four steps need to be taken to improve the use of big data for social innovation. A large chasm exists between the potential of data-driven information and its actual use in helping solve social problems. Some social problems can be readily solved using big data, such as using traffic data to help ease the flow of highway traffic or using weather data to predict the next hurricane. But what if we want to use data to help us solve our most human and critical social problems, such as homelessness, human trafficking, and education? And what if we not only want to solve these problems but do so in a way that the solutions are sustainable for the future? Social problems are often what are called “wicked” problems. Not only are they messier than their technical counterparts, they are also more dynamic and complex because of the number of stakeholders involved and the numerous feedback loops among inter-related components.

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Call over poverty attainment gap

The Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF) said the attainment gap remained "persistent and significant" in a report, produced by Strathclyde University. The report argues that despite the increase in school standards, children from low income backgrounds are still being left behind and achieving less than their better-off peers.

Citation: Education Secretary Michael Russell told BBC Radio's Good Morning Scotland programme that progress was being made in closing the gap, with "substantial sums" being invested to ensure that continued.
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Mr Russell said other measures already in place included:

Working with "schools and data"
Making sure that there is "ambition" in the system
Ensuring that the inspection system works
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Education Scotland and local councils need to ensure that every school has the data to tell them what their attainment gap is and what impact their actions are having for different groups of children

#Education   #UK   #Analytics #PositiveLocalImpact  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

 Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com
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