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Should You Take an App For That?

"Mobile health care apps now number in the thousands on the Apple and Google online stores, and many of these are targeted toward mental health."
. . .
"I think a lot of these mobile digital health technologies would like to take the role of new pharma, which is especially interesting since there hasnt been any new blockbuster drugs for mental health in a while, says John Torous, a psychiatrist at Harvard Medical School and coauthor of the 2015 study."
. . .
"There are also practical issues a feasibility study on an app designed to help manage schizophrenia, found that while users found the app to be effective, the most common technical problem was people forgetting to charge their phones."
. . .
"In the UK, the National Health Services launched a Health Apps Library in March 2013."
. . . 
"Last month, economist Simon Leigh at the University of Liverpool co-authored an article in Evidence Based Mental Health that reported among the 14 apps for depression and anxiety recommended by the NHS, only four had any research to back up their claims and only two of those used validated measurement tools to test their effectiveness."

#Mobile #FutureTechnologies #TodaysChallenge #BuildResilience   #HumanResources   #wellbeing  

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Human-in-the-loop Computing

"A machine learning model takes a first pass on the data, or every video, image or document that needs labeling. That model also assigns a confidence score, or how sure the algorithm is that it’s making the right judgment. If the confidence score is below a certain value, it sends the data to a human annotator to make a judgment. That new human judgment is used both for the business process and is fed back into the machine learning algorithm to make it smarter. In other words, when the machine isn’t sure what the answer is, it relies on a human, then adds that human judgment to its model."
. . .
"Human-computer interaction is much more important for artificial intelligence than we ever thought. In each case: chess, driving, facebook and ATMs, making sure computers and humans work well together is critical for all of these applications to work. Notably, however, there’s a different interface between the computer and the human in each but it’s the pairing of humans and machine–not the supremacy of one over the other–that yields the best results."

#ArtificialIntelligence   #FutureTechnologies  

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The Future Of AI Will Be Stacked

Rick Collins, the president for enterprise business at Next IT, argues that the the race to create an "all-encompassing virtual personal assistant project (VPA)" such as Siri, Google Now, Cortana, Watson, and even new entrants like Viv , are driving the AI experience in the wrong direction for enterprises. Why? Because, "for an AI to truly function at the enterprise level, it will require such deep integration with company knowledge, and even proprietary information and data, that the experience necessitates control of the VPA by the company." He suggests that companies should be able to build AI stacks one day, in the same way they build their CRM or marketing stacks.

#ArtificialIntelligence   #FutureTechnologies  

Posted by +Dan Durrant w/ +David Pidsley 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Gartner lays out its top 10 tech trends for 2015

1: Computing Everywhere.
2: The Internet of Things (IoT)
3: 3D printing
4: Advanced, Pervasive and Invisible Analytics
5: Context Rich Systems.
6: Smart Machines
7: Cloud and Client Computing
8: Software Defined Applications and Infrastructure
9: Web-Scale IT
10: Security

#Security #InformationTechnology #Cloud #FutureTechnologies #Analytics #InternetofThings 

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Our postnormal times

An excellent overview of our "postnormal times" written in 2010 by Ziauddin Sardar, a London-based scholar called "Britain's own Muslim polymath" by The Independent newspaper. In these times of ours the power to #AnticipateChange  is essential, but also extremely difficult.

Excerpts:
All that was ‘normal’ has now evaporated; we have entered postnormal times, the in between period where old orthodoxies are dying, new ones have not yet emerged, and nothing really makes sense. To have any notion of a viable future, we must grasp the significance of this period of transition which is characterized by three c’s: complexity, chaos and contradictions. These forces propel and sustain postnormal times leading to uncertainty and different types of ignorance that make decision-making problematic and increase risks to individuals, society and the planet.  / #DecisionMaking  
. . . 
Welcome to postnormal times. It’s a time when little out there can be trusted or gives us confidence. The espiritu del tiempo, the spirit of our age, is characterised by uncertainty, rapid change, realignment of power, upheaval and chaotic behaviour. We live in an in-between period where old orthodoxies are dying, new ones have yet to be born, and very few things seem to make sense.  / #TodaysChallenges   #BlackSwanEvents  
. . . 
...globalisation enhances complexity not simply by making us interdependent but also by increasing our interconnections. In a globalised world, everything is connected to everything else. / #Globalisation  
. . . 
We are more connected and interconnected than any other time in history. The entire globe is a network criss-crossed by networks of individuals, groups, communities, institutions constantly connected to each other by e-mails, e-lists, internet newsgroups, mobile phones, text, video conferencing, blogs, twitter, facebook, myspace, interactive digital television and 24-h news broadcasts. There is hardly a place in the world where we can be alone. The mobile phone in your pocket tells those who want to know exactly where you are and enables you to communicate with any one at any time (almost) anywhere. More and more, communication is becoming instant, all encompassing, and ever present. Indeed, it seems that nowadays we do not communicate to live; but live to communicate. / #Social   #Mobile  
. . . 
It is now fashionable to argue that we are going through unprecedented change. Things have\always changed but they have not changed with the accelerating pace we are witnessing nowadays. Take, for example, information technology, which doubles its power, as measured in price, performance and bandwidth capacity, every year. In 25 years, it would have multiplied by a factor of a billion as we move from transistors to more powerful technologies such as nanotechnology or molecular computing.  / #InformationTechnology   #FutureTechnologies  
. . . 
In postnormal conditions, flexibility, adaptation and sensitivity to markedly different initial conditions require that we develop our ethical acuity to increase the diversity of our response. We are not looking for one solution but many alternatives which create positive feedback and momentum for common principles. Such an approach demands new thinking, effort and participation by everyone. / #Storytelling  

Featured in Data Storytelling for Disruptors
http://blog.causeanalytics.com/2014/10/data-storytelling-for-disruptors.html 

Source: http://goo.gl/Sko4JO
Image via Way2Enjoy: http://goo.gl/Et3o7B
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Wearables, earables, eyeables: Welcome to the next wave of computing

Citation: Yes, Google has moved firmly into the glass form factor — eyeables — which has drawn a great deal of backlash for personal use. But there are great use cases in business for that approach (see What can we expect from Google Glass in the enterprise), so it will catch on in medicine, construction, security, military, and many other sectors. In a few years, it will seem commonplace for your dentist to peer into your mouth wearing something like Glass.

And last week, Motorola offered another take on wearables: Motorola Hint is an earable. Hint is a bluetooth earbud that can cooperate with smart phones through voice commands, or perhaps more grandly, a means to remain connected to the world without manually fiddling with devices, but simply using your voice.

#VoiceInterfaces   #Mobile   #Lifelogging   #FutureTechnologies  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Sensors in the fields: FarmLink raises $40M

In addition to FarmLink, the author notes several companies trying to reinvent farming by way of data.

Citation: Agriculture is taking on a whole new look thanks to the emergence of ubiquitous sensors and big data technologies, as farmers are now able to collect and analyze data about nearly every aspect of their operations. The latest evidence of how big the agriculture-meets-data market might be in the future came on Wednesday, when a Kansas City, Missouri-based company called FarmLink announced it has closed a $40 million round of venture capital, led by OpenAir Equity Partners.

FarmLink collects data from sensor-equipped combines and then analyzes it to determine the maximum yield for any given tract of land. After this summer’s harvest, the company claims in a press release, it will have “more than 5 million acres of real yield data, along with more than a trillion data elements.”
. . . 
The more data sensors let us generate about the food we eat, the way we treat disease and the way our cities function, the more shots we have to put new computing techniques to the test and really make a difference.

#NaturalResources   #BigData   #InternetofThings   #FutureTechnologies   #HealthCare  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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Could computers captain the world’s cargo ships?

Citation: Cargo ships carry the bulk of the world’s trade – but are a major source of pollution. Could computer control go some way to making them cleaner and more efficient? 
. . . 
“There are two primary drivers for automation,” says [Matt Collette, who teaches ship design at the University of Michigan in the United States.]. “One is that human beings are not very good at long repetitive tasks.” Which is of course what standing watch on a long ocean voyage is. “That’s when you see lapses in concentration that lead to the ship getting into a collision or running aground,” he explains. “Automation could reduce those types of accidents significantly, because the computers have no problem paying attention for a two-month voyage.”
. . . 
“If the ship had no people on it, then you’re not going to see that increase in crew costs, so you could potentially have ships sailing much slower than they are today and becoming more efficient in terms of their carbon emissions,” Collette says.

#Automation   #Logistics   #ConserveEnergy   #FutureTechnologies  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com

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The eyesight of machines is growing stronger

A lot of new developments in machine vision were revealed at this year's Large Scale Visual Recognition Challenge. All of the winning groups chose to share the details of their technical innovations, keeping them proprietary. / #DriveInnovation  

That means we're likely to see commercial applications a bit sooner. So, in the not too distant future expect #ArtificialIntelligence  to play a bigger role in medical diagnosis, factory robotics and automotive safety systems. The author points out that "a number of carmakers have added the ability to recognize pedestrians and bicyclists and stop automatically without driver intervention." / #ReduceRisk   #Automation  

Still, machines have yet to achieve what scientists call “scene understanding," which entails comprehending the whole story of what is happening in an image by using human language. If they ever figure it out, let me know, so that I can strap one of those machines onto my head. Heh.. / #FutureTechnologies  

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Gadi Amit on designing wearable technology for the quantified self

Citation: Within 10 years we will be wearing up to 10 devices on our body that continually monitor the rhythms of our body and mind, according to designer Gadi Amit.
. . .
‘I’ve been exposed to products in the last year that are capable of telling you whether you are in the right mind state to engage in, let’s say, an intellectual competition—if you want to debate something.’

In this situation, a device would warn you about your stress and anxiety levels, and help you learn about and understand the ideal state of mind for presenting a paper or arguing your case.
. . .
This kind of personal information will be gathered from devices we will wear, and be stored in the cloud.

‘We will have a persona in the cloud of digital data that belongs to us—and it will be a somewhat different exponent of us,’ he says.
. . . 
‘Legislators will eventually have to recognise something I call the digital persona,’ says Amit. ‘Any treatment of it will have to be taken into account as if it is our home, or private space.’

‘It doesn’t mean prohibiting companies to access it and use it for research, as we currently allow a lot of companies to reach this data today. But for people using it without our will, they will have to go through significant barriers in order to use it.’

Amit argues that our current legislative environment—with its complex checks and balances—will have to change, as it is too slow to keep up with technological advances. 

#Lifelogging #Cloud    #Privacy   #FutureTechnologies  

Posted by +Dan Durrant 

Cause Analytics is here to help you navigate through Business Intelligence, understand today's challenges and tomorrow's technologies.

www.CauseAnalytics.com
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