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Role of Information Technology in Indian Railway Service. Railways all over the world progressively implements Information Technology for improvement in efficiency and for better management.

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According to legend, the city of Bhangarh was cursed by the Baba Balanath. He had sanctioned the construction of the town on one condition, "The moment the shadows of your palaces touch me, the city shall be no more!" When a descendant prince raised the palace to a height that cast a shadow on Balanath's forbidden retreat, he cursed the town. Balanath is said to be buried there to this day in a small samadhi.

Another myth is related to the Princess of Bhangarh, Ratnavati. She was believed to be the jewel of Rajasthan. On her eighteenth birthday she began to get offers of marriage from other regions (i.e. nobility). In Bhangarh lived a tantrik (wizard), a magician well versed in the occult, called Singhiya, who was in love with the princess but knew that the match was impossible. One day Singhiya saw the princess's maid in the market and used his black magic on the scent she was purchasing so that upon touching it the princess would surrender herself to him. The princess, however, seeing the tantrik enchanting the scent, foiled his plan by pouring it on boulder which crushed Singhiya. Dying, the tantrik cursed the palace with the death of all who dwelt in it.[6] The next year there was a battle between Bhangarh and Ajabgarh in which Princess Ratnavati perished. Legends says that there are ghosts of Singhiya and other locals in Bhangarh Fort and that is why entry is prohibited for tourists in the fort after sunset and before sunrise.[6] The locals believe that the princess Ratnavati has taken birth somewhere else and that the fort and the empire of Bhangarh is waiting for her return to put an end to the curse.
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The Andaman and Nicobar Islands /ˈændəmən/ & /ˈnɪkəbɑr/ ( local (help·info)) are a group of islands at the juncture of the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea, and are a Union Territory of India.
The territory is 150 km (93 mi) north of Aceh in Indonesia and separated from Thailand and Myanmar (Burma) by the Andaman Sea. It comprises two island groups, the Andaman Islands and the Nicobar Islands, separated by the 10°N parallel, with the Andamans to the north of this latitude, and the Nicobars to the south. The Andaman Sea lies to the east and the Bay of Bengal to the west.
The territory's capital is the Andamanese town of Port Blair. The total land area of the territory is approximately 8,249 km2 (3,185 sq mi). The capital of Nicobar Islands is Car Nicobar. The islands host the Andaman and Nicobar Command, the only tri-service geographical command of the Indian Arme
 

Chittorgarh Fort (Hindi/Rajasthani: चित्तौड दुर्ग Chittorgarh Durg) is the largest fort in India and the grandest in the state of Rajasthan. It is a World Heritage Site. The fort, plainly known as Chittor, was the capital of Mewar and is today situated several kilometres south of Bhilwara. It was initially ruled by Guhilot and later by Sisodias, the Suryavanshi clans of Chattari Rajputs, from the 7th century, until it was finally abandoned in 1568 after the siege by Emperor Akbar in 1567. It sprawls majestically over a hill 180 m (590.6 ft) in height spread over an area of 280 ha (691.9 acres) above the plains of the valley drained by the Berach River. The fort precinct with an evocative history is studded with a series of historical palaces, gates, temples and two prominent commemoration towers. These monumental ruins have inspired the imagination of tourists and writers for centuries.[1][2][3]
The fort was sacked three times between the 15th and 16th centuries; in 1303 Allauddin Khilji defeated Rana Ratan Singh, in 1535 Bahadur Shah, the Sultan of Gujarat defeated Bikramjeet Singh and in 1567 Emperor Akbar defeated Maharana Udai Singh II who left the fort and founded Udaipur. Each time the men fought bravely rushing out of the fort walls charging the enemy but lost every time. Following these defeats, Jauhar was committed thrice by more than 13,000 ladies and children of the Rajput heroes who laid their lives in battles at Chittorgarh Fort, first led by Rani Padmini wife of Rana Rattan Singh who was killed in the battle in 1303, and later by Rani Karnavati in 1537 AD.[1][2][4]
Thus, the fort represents the quintessence of tribute to the nationalism, courage, medieval chivalry and sacrifice exhibited by the Mewar rulers of Sisodia and their kinsmen and women and children, between the 7th and 16th centuries. The rulers, their soldiers, the women folk of royalty and the commoners considered death as a better option than dishonor in the face of surrender to the foreign invading armies.[1][4]

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Hemis Monastery is a Tibetan Buddhist monastery (gompa) of the Drukpa Lineage, located in Hemis, Ladakh (within the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir). Situated 45 km fromLeh, the monastery was re-established in 1672 by the Ladakhi king Sengge Namgyal. The annual Hemis festival honoring Padmasambhava is held here in early June.
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10/03/2014
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Mysore (or Mysuru) (Listeni/maɪˈsɔər/; Kannada: ಮೈಸೂರು) is the third-largest city in the state of Karnataka, India, which served as the capital city of Mysore Princely Kingdom (Kingdom of Mysore) for nearly six centuries, from 1399 until 1947. Located at the base of the Chamundi Hills about 146 km (91 mi) southwest of the state capital Bangalore, it is spread across an area of 128.42 km2 (50 sq mi). According to the provisional results of the 2011 national census of India, the population of Mysore is 887,446; of which male and female are 443,813 and 443,633 respectively. The total population of the urban agglomeration (UA) is 983,893, of which 493,692 are males and 490,201 are females.Mysore City Corporation is responsible for the civic administration of the city, which is also the headquarters of the Mysore district and the Mysore division.
The Kingdom of Mysore was ruled by the Wodeyar dynasty, except for a brief and illustrious period in the late 18th century when Hyder Ali and Tipu Sultan were the distinguished rulers. Patrons of art and culture, the Wodeyars contributed significantly to the cultural growth of the city. The cultural ambience and achievements of Mysore earned it the sobriquet Cultural capital of Karnataka.
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2014-02-15
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HISTORY OF BISHNUPUR TERRACOTTA  TEMPLES:-
About 200 kilometers from Calcutta is the town of BISHNUPUR  famous for its terracotta temples. There are about 30 of these temples scattered over a wide area, all built during the reign of the Mallas. The Mallas, whose rise to power is shrouded in legend, ruled in the 17th and 18th centuries.

Adi Malla is supposed to have been the first Malla king. According to a story, he was abandoned by his father, a prince, and was brought up by tribals. One day, in his seventh year, the boy was taken to a festival held in hon our of a dead tribal chieftain. The dead man's elephant swung the boy up in his trunk and placed him on the seat of power. Thereupon, the tribals acknowledged him as their new ruler and named him Adi Malla. A long line of Malla rulers followed. Some of them may have taken over neighboring territories because eventually the Mallas had a kingdom to rule over.
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2013-10-01
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