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NOAM CHOMSKY SPEAKS

“I get fantastic medical care, because I’m rich and medical care is rationed by wealth. If you’re rich, the system is working just right. The insurance companies, the health maintenance organizations, the pharmaceutical corporations are doing just great. Wealthy people are doing fine. If most of the population can’t get decent medical care, that’s not our problem. If health care costs are astronomical, too bad.”

Noam Chomsky

“If they do it it's terrorism, if we do it it’s counter–terrorism. That’s an historical universal: Go back to Nazi propaganda the most extreme mass murders ever. If you look at Nazi propaganda, it’s exactly what they said: They said they are defending the populations and the legitimate governments of Europe like Vichy from the terrorist partisans who are directed from London, that’s the basic propaganda line ... We did it therefore it’s a just cause: You can read that in the Nazi archives too.”

Noam Chomsky

NOAM CHOMSKY VERSUS THE HOLOCAUST

“[Noam Chomsky] forfeited authority as a political commentator by a series of actions widely regarded as ill–judged (repeated polemics minimizing the Khmer Rouge atrocities in Cambodia; endorsement of a book which Chomsky admitted he had not read that denied the historical reality of the Jewish Holocaust).”

Geoffrey Sampson, “Censoring ‘20th Century Culture’: The Case of Noam Chomsky,” New Criterion, 3.2(1984): 7–16.

See: Werner Cohen, Partners in Hate: Noam Chomsky and the Holocaust Deniers, Cambridge, 1995.

NOAM CHOMSKY DEFENDS POL POT AND THE KHMER ROUGE

“Khmer Rouge apologists easily outnumbered those who believed a tragedy was under way. These people had been vociferous opponents of the Vietnam War ... And to them, whatever the U.S. government had to say now was per force a lie ... Before the subcommittee, Porter said simply that it was ‘a myth that between one million and two million Cambodians have been victims of a regime led by genocidal maniacs’ ... A few weeks earlier Noam Chomsky, an author and academic, offered an article in the Nation that conflated the American bombing and the Khmer Rouge horrors and made the same broad argument as the other apologists. He cited ‘highly qualified specialists’ whom he did not name, but ‘who have studied the full range of evidence available, and who have concluded that executions numbered at most in the thousands.’”

Joel Brinkley, Cambodia’s Curse: The Modern History of a Troubled Land, (New York: Public Affairs, 2011), 48–49.

“Chomsky has uncovered a huge number of hugely suppressed facts and, more significantly, embedded them in a theoretical framework which makes it clear how and why the establishment acts as it does.”

Neil Smith, Chomsky: Ideas and Ideals, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999, 195.

“Noam Chomsky was the most conspicuous American intellectual to rationalize the Al Qaeda terrorist attacks on New York and Washington. The death toll, he argued, was minor compared to the list of Third World victims of the ‘far more extreme terrorism’ of United States foreign policy. Despite its calculated affront to mainstream opinion, this sentiment went down very well with Chomsky’s own constituency. He has never been more popular among the academic and intellectual left than he is today ... Chomsky was this regime’s [Khmer Rouge] most prestigious and most persistent Western apologist ... Chomsky has declared himself a libertarian and anarchist but has defended some of the most authoritarian and murderous regimes in human history. His political philosophy is purportedly based on empowering the oppressed and toiling masses but he has contempt for ordinary people who he regards as ignorant dupes of the privileged and the powerful. He has defined the responsibility of the intellectual as the pursuit of truth and the exposure of lies, but has supported the regimes he admires by suppressing the truth and perpetrating falsehoods. He has endorsed universal moral principles but has only applied them to Western liberal democracies, while continuing to rationalize the crimes of his own political favorites. He is a mandarin who denounces mandarins. When caught out making culpably irresponsible misjudgments, as he was over Cambodia and Sudan, he has never admitted he was wrong.”

Keith Windschuttle, “The Hypocrisy of Noam Chomsky,” FrontPage Magazine, Friday, 2 May 2003.
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AMERICAN IDEALISM VERSUS NOAM CHOMSKY
Christopher Richard Wade Dettling (2016–2017)

American idealism needs the leaven of geopolitical analysis to find its way through the maze of new complexities. Henry Kissinger

Idealists whose minds are attuned to the rational conception of right found in the Magna Carta and The Constitution of the United States of America, the American notion of Global freedom in the world of today, will immediately understand the bankruptcy of modern European unreason in the passages that follow.¹ American Idealists will recognize the outdated Napoléonic and French revolutionary conception of right, the contagion of 20th century autocracy founded upon popular consent, and they will immediately know beyond all doubt, exactly why Noam Chomsky is a very dangerous philosophical sophist whose anti–American ideology has fanned the flames of terrorism and violence across the Globe, from Europe to the Middle East, via South East Asia and Latin America: How many American lives have been ruined or destroyed by anti–Americanism around the world, and how much terrorism and violence were unleashed upon America in the past half–century, thanks to the anti–American ideology of Noam Chomsky and his followers?

According to Noam Chomsky, the Government of the United States of America is a Nazi Terror Regime:

“If they do it it’s terrorism, if we do it it’s counter–terrorism. That’s an historical universal: Go back to Nazi propaganda the most extreme mass murders ever. If you look at Nazi propaganda, it’s exactly what they said: They said they are defending the populations and the legitimate governments of Europe like Vichy from the terrorist partisans who are directed from London, that’s the basic propaganda line ... We did it therefore it’s a just cause: You can read that in the Nazi archives too.”
Noam Chomsky [Television Interview Transcript]

“Chomsky did not say that the US government is a Nazi terror regime ... intellectuals in power systems line up to sing the praises of those in power, and that we represent the righteous course of history. This is precisely what every major power has done and said, without exception, from Nazi Germany to Imperial Japan to Colonial Britain.”
Glen MacPherson, 2016

A: ?
B: ?
C: Therefore, “Chomsky did not say that the US government is a Nazi terror regime.”

Glen MacPherson: Intellectuals in power systems line up to sing the praises of those in power, and that we represent the righteous course of history. This is precisely what every major power has done and said, without exception, from Nazi Germany to Imperial Japan to Colonial Britain: Therefore Noam Chomsky did not say that the US government is a Nazi terror regime?

Therefore: “According to Noam Chomsky the Government of the United States of America is a Nazi Terror Regime” = Chomsky did say that the US government is a Nazi terror regime?

“Chomsky did not [merely] say that the US government is a Nazi terror regime” and “[some] intellectuals in [some] power systems [sometimes] line up to sing the praises of [some of] those in power, and that [sometimes] we represent the righteous course of [some] history. This is precisely what every major power has [sometimes] done and said, without exception, from Nazi Germany to Imperial Japan to Colonial Britain.”

Therefore, according to Noam Chomsky the Government of the United States of America is a Nazi Terror Regime, namely he implies that Washington is a Nazi Terror Regime: Chomsky implies that the outdated Napoléonic and French revolutionary conception of right is not the cause of Bonapartism, namely, autocracy founded upon popular consent; he implies that the conception of right found in the Magna Carta, the fountainhead of the Industrial revolution, is the cause of modern European political and economic irrationalism in the 20th century, because he implies that the former conception of right, and not the latter, is the basis of The Constitution of the United States of America:

Noam Chomsky, American Power and the New Mandarins: Historical and Political Essays, (New York: Pantheon Books, 1969).

Noam Chomsky, At War With Asia: Essays on Indochina, (New York: Pantheon, 1970).

Noam Chomsky, Two Essays on Cambodia, (London: Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation, 1970).

Noam Chomsky, For Reasons of State, (New York: Pantheon Books, 1973).

Noam Chomsky, “Preface,” Cambodia in the Southeast Asian War, Malcolm Caldwell and Lek Tan, (New York: Monthly Review Press, 1973).

Noam Chomsky, Peace in the Middle East? Reflections on Justice and Nationhood, (New York: Pantheon Books, 1974).

Noam Chomsky, “Introduction,” Cointelpro: The FBI’s Secret War on Political Freedom, Cathy Perkus, (New York: Monad Press, 1975).

Noam Chomsky, “Forward,” Arabs in Israel, Sabri Jiryis, (New York: Monthly Review Press, 1976).

Noam Chomsky and Edward S. Herman, After the Cataclysm: Postwar Indochina and Reconstruction of Imperial Ideology, (Sydney: Hale & Iremonger, 1980).

Noam Chomsky, Towards a New Cold War: Essays on the Current Crisis and How We Got There, (New York: Pantheon, 1981).

Noam Chomsky, Jonathan Steele and John Gittings, Superpowers in Collision: The Cold War Now, (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1982).

Noam Chomsky, The Fateful Triangle: The United States, Israel and the Palestinians, (Boston, MA: South End Press, 1983).

Noam Chomsky, Pirates and Emperors: International Terrorism in the Real World, (Brattleboro, VT: Amana Books, 1986).

Noam Chomsky, Deterring Democracy, (London: Verso Books, 1991).

Noam Chomsky, Terrorizing the Neighborhood: American Foreign Policy in the Post–Cold War Era, (San Francisco: AK Press & Pressure Drop Press, 1991).

Noam Chomsky, The Culture of Terrorism, (Boston, MA: South End Press, 1999).

Noam Chomsky, The Umbrella of Power: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Contradiction of U.S. Policy, (New York: Seven Stories Press, 1999).

Noam Chomsky, Heinz Dieterich, Denise Glasbeek and Julian Sempill, Latin America: From Colonization to Globalization, (Mitchell, Australia: Ocean Press, 2002).

Noam Chomsky, Hegemony or Survival: America’s Quest for Global Dominance, (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2003).

Noam Chomsky, Power and Terror: Post–9/11 Talks and Interviews, (New York: Seven Stories Press, 2003).

Noam Chomsky, Imperial Ambitions, (London: Hamish Hamilton Ltd., 2005).

Noam Chomsky, Howard Zinn and William Blum, et. alia, Superpower Principles: U.S. Terrorism Against Cuba, Salim Lamrani, editor, (Monroe, ME: Common Courage Press, 2005).

Noam Chomsky, Failed States: The Abuse of Power and the Assault on Democracy, (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2006).

Noam Chomsky, John Junkerman and Takei Masakazu, Power and Terror: Conflict, Hegemony, and the Rule of Force, (New York: Routledge, 2011).

Noam Chomsky and Heinz Dieterich, Power Systems: Conversations on Global Democratic Uprisings and the New Challenges to US Empire, (London: Penguin/Hamish Hamilton Ltd., 2013).

Noam Chomsky and André Vltchek, On Western Terrorism: From Hiroshima to Drone Warfare, (Toronto: Between the Lines, 2013).

Noam Chomsky was seduced very early by the philosophical sophistry of Locke, Leibnitz, Hume and Kant, namely “Europe’s Machiavellian relativism and selfishness” (Henry Kissinger),² the subjectivism, relativism and irrationalism of modern European unreason: Noam Chomsky maintains the ultimate realm of logical and linguistic truth and reality is unknowable; in other words, Chomsky’s program to revise and replace traditional grammar is deeply inspired by the Kantian delusion that the ultimate realm of truth and reality is unknowable; Chomsky endeavors to transform traditional grammar based upon his version of logical and linguistic phenomena, in order to lend credence to the highfalutin verbiage with which he clothes his modern European political and economic irrationalism, and to attack his adversaries as bad grammarians, namely as Hegelians (as conservatives, right–wing extremists and fascists).³ Chomsky’s 20th century modern European irrationalism has collapsed in the face of Globalism and the supremacy of universal freedom in the world of today.⁴

How many American lives have been ruined or destroyed by anti–Americanism around the world, and how much terrorism and violence were unleashed upon America in the past half–century, thanks to the anti–American ideology of Noam Chomsky and his followers?

ENDNOTES

1. See: “America serves its values best by perfecting democracy at home, thereby acting as a beacon for the rest of mankind ... America’s values impose on it an obligation to crusade for them around the world ... [American Idealists] envisioned as normal a global international order based on democracy, free commerce, and international law. Since no such system has ever existed, its evocation often appears to other societies as utopian, if not naïve. Still, foreign skepticism never dimmed the idealism of Woodrow Wilson, Franklin Roosevelt, or Ronald Reagan, or indeed of all other twentieth–century American presidents. If anything it has spurred America’s faith that history can be overcome and that if the world truly wants peace, it needs to apply America’s moral prescriptions.”
Henry Kissinger, Diplomacy, New York, Simon & Schuster, 1994, 18.

American Idealists are not theoreticians, doctrinaires and idéologues cloistered in their ivory towers: Americanism is forged by American Idealists like Henry Kissinger in the world historical collapse of modernity and rise of Globalism:

“In the post–Cold War world, American idealism needs the leaven of geopolitical analysis to find its way through the maze of new complexities.”
Henry Kissinger, Ibidem, 812.

See: “Americans, protected by the size and isolation of their country, as well as by their own idealism and mistrust of the Old World, have sought to conduct a unique kind of foreign policy based on the way they wanted the [old] world to be, as opposed to the way it really is ... Modern diplomacy emerged from the trials and experiences of the balance of power of warfare and peacemaking ... America, sometimes to its peril, refused to learn its [modern European diplomacy] lessons ... Americans, from the very beginning, sought a distinctive foreign policy based on [American] idealism.”
Henry Kissinger, Ibidem, Jacket.

America refused to follow in the footsteps of modern European diplomacy, sometimes to its peril, because Americans, from the very beginning, sought a distinctive foreign policy based on idealism and their mistrust of the Old World: American Idealists have sought to conduct a unique kind of foreign policy based on the way they wanted the Old World to be, as opposed to modern European diplomacy.

2. Henry Kissinger, Ibidem, 820.

3. “Nearly fifty years ago Chomsky argued for explicit rigor, for various levels of representation provided by a theory of grammar, and for seeking a precise evaluation metric to compare grammars ... we can revisit this matter and many others in light of subsequent work developing theories of grammar and spelling out the details of Universal Grammar, now seen [by Chomskyians] as defining the language faculty ... It has also spawned new approaches to old philosophical questions, notions of meaning and reference, and Chomsky has taken the lead in this area.”
David W. Lightfoot, “Introduction,” Syntactic Structures, 2nd edition, Noam Chomsky, New York/Berlin, Mouton de Gruyter, 2002, v–xviii, xvi.

Noam Chomsky, according to David W. Lightfoot, is not a sophist, but is a philosopher, among other things. We will evaluate how exactly Chomsky puts into political and economic language the so–called explicit rigor, levels of representation and precise evaluation of his grammar theory. Afortiori, Chomsky’s political and economic grammar is inseparable from his theory of grammar: We will uncover and expose this link. We will examine in detail some of Noam Chomsky’s sophistical philosophical arguments with regards to his “notions” of meaning and reference in the world historical realm of political and economic language.

We will discover that Chomsky’s sophistical notions (sophisms) of meaning and reference are advanced in the world historical realm of politics and economics as “logical and linguistic” justifications for the language of modern European political and economic irrationalism. Noam Chomsky’s anti–American sophisms of meaning and reference are therefore very dangerous delusions in the Global world of today, especially in the Middle East, but also in Western countries vulnerable to terrorist attacks, such as nations in southern and eastern Europe: The anti–American ideology of Noam Chomsky and his followers is a very serious threat to America and Americans in every corner of the Globe.

See: “The successful use of terrorism is not considered a scandal. On the contrary, it is welcomed and applauded, including large–scale state terrorism in the Middle East–Mediterranean region sponsored or carried out directly by the United States.”
Noam Chomsky, The Culture of Terrorism, London, 1988, 92.

For what reason these labors of American Idealism? The American victims of Global terrorism, and their families, must be financially compensated for the terrible pain and suffering they have endured over the years: Class action lawsuits must be launched against Noam Chomsky and his followers, the publishing firms and websites that have backed them, and the academic institutions that have employed them. Anti–Americanism has greatly fanned the flames of terrorism and violence around the world, and contributed to radicalization and extremism, the fertile recruiting ground of terrorist organizations. Noam Chomsky and his followers have provided terrorist groups and cells across the Globe with the sophistical and ideological weapons of anti–Americanism which have greatly contributed over the decades to the contagion of terrorism and violence against America and the Western world.

4. See: “The year 1992 poses a critical moral and cultural challenge for the more privileged sectors of the world–dominant societies. The challenge is heightened by the fact that within these societies, notably the first European colony liberated from imperial rule, popular struggle over many centuries has achieved a large measure of freedom, opening many opportunities for independent thought and committed action. How this challenge is addressed in the years to come will have fateful consequences. October 11, 1992 brings to an end the 500th year of the Old World Order, sometimes called the Colombian era of world history, or the Vasco da Gama era, depending on which adventurers bent on plunder got there first. Or ‘the 500–year Reich,’ to borrow the title of a commemorative volume that compares the methods and ideology of the Nazis with those of the European invaders who subjugated most of the world. The major theme of this Old World Order was a confrontation between the conquerors and the conquered on a global scale. It has taken various forms, and been given different names: Imperialism, neocolonialism, the North–South conflict, core versus periphery, G–7 (the 7 leading state capitalist industrial societies) and their satellites versus the rest. Or, more simply, Europe’s conquest of the world ... ‘Hegel discoursed authoritatively on the same topics in his lectures on philosophy of history, brimming with confidence as we approach the final ‘phase of World–History,’ when Spirit reaches ‘its full maturity and strength’ in ‘the German world.’ Speaking from that lofty peak, he relates that native America was ‘physically and psychically powerless,’ its culture so limited that it ‘must expire as soon as Spirit approached it.’ Hence ‘the aborigines ... gradually vanished at the breath of European activity.’ ‘A mild and passionless disposition, want of spirit, and a crouching submissiveness ... are the chief characteristics of the native Americans,’ so ‘slothful’ that, under the kind ‘authority of the Friars,’ ‘at midnight a bell had to remind them even of their matrimonial duties.’ They were inferior even to the Negro, ‘the natural man in his completely wild and untamed state,’ who is beyond any ‘thought of reverence and morality ―all that we call feeling’; there is ‘nothing harmonious with humanity ... in this type of character.’ ‘Among the Negroes moral sentiments are quite weak, or more strictly speaking non–existent.’ ‘Parents sell their children, and conversely children their parents, as either has the opportunity,’ and ‘The polygamy of the Negroes has frequently for its object the having many children, to be sold, every one of them, into slavery.’ Creatures at the level of ‘a mere Thing ―an object of no value,’ they treat ‘as enemies’ those who seek to abolish slavery, which has ‘been the occasion of the increase of human feeling among the Negroes,’ enabling them to become ‘participant in a higher morality and the culture connected with it’ ... Hegel, Philosophy, 108–9, 81–2, 93–6; ‘the German world’ presumably takes in Northwest Europe ... Hegel, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich. The Philosophy of History (Dover, 1956; Lectures of 1830–31).”

Noam Chomsky, Year 501: The Conquest Continues, Montréal/New York, 1993, 3–4–5–291–313.

See: “Hegel discoursed authoritatively ... in his lectures on philosophy of history.”
Chomsky, Ibidem, 4.

That Hegel discoursed authoritatively in his lectures on philosophy of history does not mean the hitherto published editions of Hegel’s Lectures are authoritative, particularly the edition which Chomsky cites, although it goes without saying that, trivially speaking, back in the day when Hegel gave his lectures, he did so in a very authoritative manner, at least according to the historical accounts of some of his pupils.

See: “In general, the student notes written during or after Hegel’s classes should be used with caution … According to Leopold von Henning’s preface (pp. vi–vii) in his edition (1839) of the Encyclopädie of 1830, the editors of the Encyclopedia sometimes changed or completed the sentences in which the students had rendered Hegel’s classes.”
Adriaan Theodoor Basilius Peperzak, Modern Freedom: Hegel’s Legal, Moral, and Political Philosophy, Dordrecht, 2001, 27–29.

See: Leopold Dorotheus von Henning, Hrsg., “Vorwort des Herausgebers,” Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel’s Encyklopädie der philosophischen Wissenschaften im Grundrisse―Die Logik: Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel’s Werke, Vollständige Ausgabe durch einen Verein von Freunden des Verewigten: D. Ph. Marheineke, D. J. Schulze, D. Ed. Gans, D. Lp. v. Henning, D. H. Hotho, D. K. Michelet, D. F. Förster, Erster Theil, Erste Auflage, Sechster (6) Band, Berlin, 1840, v–viii.

See also: Leopold Dorotheus von Henning, Hrsg., “Vorwort des Herausgebers,” Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel’s Encyklopädie der philosophischen Wissenschaften im Grundrisse―Die Logik: Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel’s Werke, Vollständige Ausgabe durch einen Verein von Freunden des Verewigten: D. Ph. Marheineke, D. J. Schulze, D. Ed. Gans, D. Lp. v. Henning, D. H. Hotho, D. K. Michelet, D. F. Förster, Erster Theil, Zweite Auflage, Sechster (6) Band, Berlin, 1843, v–viii.

See also: “The transcripts known today for all the Berlin lecture series are consistently, even surprisingly, reliable testimonies … It may indeed be disconcerting that only today do we doubt ― and not everyone does ― that Hegel’s lectures … are actually reproduced authentically in the published [Berlin] edition … that did not become full–blown for more than a hundred and fifty years. We can hardly examine here all the reasons for this circumstance.”
Annemarie Gethmann–Siefert, “Introduction: The Shape and Influence of Hegel’s Aesthetics,” Lectures on the Philosophy of Art: The Hotho Transcript of the 1823 Berlin Lectures, Robert F. Brown, editor and translator, Oxford, 2014, 32–46.

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NOAM CHOMSKY: SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY 1949–2017
Christopher Richard Wade Dettling (2017)

Noam Chomsky, The Morphophonemics of Modern Hebrew, Undergraduate thesis, (Philadelphia: The University of Pennsylvania, 1949).

Noam Chomsky, The Morphophonemics of Modern Hebrew, MA thesis, (Philadelphia: The University of Pennsylvania, 1951).

Noam Chomsky, “Systems of Syntactic Analysis,” Journal of Symbolic Logic, 18.3(1953): 242–256.

Noam Chomsky, The Logical Structure of Linguistic Theory, typescript & microfilm (mimeograph), (Massachusetts: Harvard University/MIT, 1955–1956).

Noam Chomsky, Transformational Analysis, Ph.D. dissertation, (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 1955).

Noam Chomsky, “Logical Syntax and Semantics: Their Linguistic Relevance,” Language, 31.1(January, 1955): 36–45.

Noam Chomsky, “Three Models for the Description of Language,” IRE Transactions on Information Theory, IT-2(1956): 113–124.

Noam Chomsky, Morris Halle and Fred Lukoff, “On Accent and Juncture in English,” For Roman Jakobson: Essays on the Occasion of His Sixtieth Birthday, Morris Halle, Fred Lukoff, Horace Lunt, Hugh McLean and Cornelis van Schooneveld, contributors, (The Hague: Mouton, 1956), 65–80.

Noam Chomsky, Syntactic Structures, (The Hague: Mouton & Company, 1957).

Noam Chomsky and George Armitage Miller, Pattern Conception: Technical Report, (1957).

Noam Chomsky and George Armitage Miller, “Finite State Languages,” Information and Control, 1(1958): 91–112.

Noam Chomsky, “On Certain Formal Properties of Grammars,” Information and Control, 2(1959): 137–167.

Noam Chomsky, “A Note on Phrase Structure Grammars,” Information and Control, 2(1959): 393–395.

Noam Chomsky, “Review of B.F. Skinner: Verbal Behaviour (1957),” Language, 35(1959): 26–58.

Noam Chomsky, “On the Notion ‘Rule of Grammar,’” Structure of Language and Its Mathematical Aspects: Proceedings of Symposia in Applied Mathematics, vol. 12, Roman Jakobson, editor, (Providence, Rhode Island: American Mathematical Society, 1961), 6–24.

Noam Chomsky, “A Transformational Approach to Syntax,” Proceedings of the Third Texas Conference on Problems of Linguistic Analysis of English, 1958, Archibald A. Hill, editor, (Austin, Texas: University of Texas Press, 1962), 124–158.

Noam Chomsky, “Context–free Grammars and Pushdown Storage,” Quarterly Progress Report: MIT Research Laboratory of Electronics, 65(March, 1962): 187–194.

Noam Chomsky, “The Logical Basis for Linguistic Theory,” Proceedings of the Ninth International Congress of Linguists: Cambridge, Massachusetts, August 27–31, vol. 12, Horace Gray Lunt, editor, (The Hague: Mouton, 1962), 914–978.

Noam Chomsky, “On the Notion ‘Rule of Grammar,’” Readings in the Philosophy of Language, Jerry A. Fodor & Jerrold J. Katz, editors, (New York: Prentice–Hall,1963), ?

Noam Chomsky, “The Logical Basis for Linguistic Theory,” Readings in the Philosophy of Language, Jerry A. Fodor & Jerrold J. Katz, editors, (New York: Prentice–Hall,1963), ?

Noam Chomsky and Marcel–Paul Schützenberger, “The Algebraic Theory of Context Free Languages,” Studies in Logic and the Foundations of Mathematics, P. Braffort and D. Hirschberg, editors, (North Holland, 1963), 118–161.

Noam Chomsky, “Three Models for the Description of Language (Corrected Version?),” Readings in Mathematical Psychology, vol. 2, Robert Duncan Luce, Robert R. Bush & Eugene Galanter, editors, (New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1963), 105–124.

Noam Chomsky and George Armitage Miller, “Introduction to the Formal Analysis of Natural Languages,” Handbook of Mathematical Psychology, vol. 2, Robert Duncan Luce, Robert R. Bush & Eugene Galanter, editors, Richard C. Atkinson, William K. Estes, Anatol Rapoport & Saul Sternberg, contributors, (New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1963), 269–322.

Noam Chomsky, “Formal Properties of Grammars,” Handbook of Mathematical Psychology, vol. 2, Robert Duncan Luce, Robert R. Bush & Eugene Galanter, editors, Richard C. Atkinson, William K. Estes, George Armitage Miller, Anatol Rapoport & Saul Sternberg, contributors, (New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1963), 323–418.

Noam Chomsky and George Armitage Miller, “Finitary Models of Language Users,” Handbook of Mathematical Psychology, vol. 2, Robert Duncan Luce, Robert R. Bush & Eugene Galanter, editors, Richard C. Atkinson, William K. Estes, Anatol Rapoport & Saul Sternberg, contributors, (New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1963), 419–492.

Noam Chomsky, Current Issues in Linguistic Theory, (The Hague/Paris: Mouton and Company, 1964).

Noam Chomsky, Aspects of the Theory of Syntax, (Cambridge, Massachusetts: The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press, 1965).

Noam Chomsky, Topics in the Theory of Generative Grammar, (The Hague/Paris: Mouton and Company, 1966).

Noam Chomsky, Cartesian Linguistics: A Chapter in the History of Rationalist Thought, (New York: Harper & Row, 1966).

Noam Chomsky, Eric H. Lenneberg and Otto Marx, Biological Foundations of Language, (New York: John Wiley, 1967).

Noam Chomsky, The Dissenting Academy, Theodore Roszak, editor, Robert Engler, Louis Kampf, contributors, (New York: Pantheon Books, 1967).

Noam Chomsky, The Responsibility of Intellectuals, (1967).

Noam Chomsky, Language and Mind, (New York: Harcourt Brace & World, 1968).

Noam Chomsky and Morris Halle, The Sound Pattern of English, (New York: Harper & Row, 1968).

Noam Chomsky, Perspectives on Vietnam, microform, (1969).

Noam Chomsky, American Power and the New Mandarins: Historical and Political Essays, (New York: Pantheon Books, 1969).

Noam Chomsky, “Nationalism and Conflict in Palestine,” Columbia University Forum, (Winter, 1969): ?

Noam Chomsky, J. Agee, T. Sherman, F. Perego, Vinca Masini Lara, M. Mariotti, S. Docimo, M. Bense, Bonito Oliva Achille, Marcatre 50–55, (Roma: Lerici Editore, 1969).

Noam Chomsky, “Quine’s Empirical Assumptions,” Donald Davidson& Jakko Hintikka, editors, Words and Objections: Essays on the Work of W.V. Quine, (Dordrecht: Reidel, 1963), ?

Noam Chomsky, Saggi linguistici, (Milano: Boringhieri, 1969).

Noam Chomsky, “Remarks on Nominalization,” Readings in English Transformational Grammar, Roderick A. Jacobs & Peter S. Rosenbaum, editors, (Waltham, Massachusetts: Ginn & Company,1970), 184–221.

Noam Chomsky, “Deep Structure, Surface Structure and Semantic Interpretation,” Studies in English and Oriental Linguistics Presented to Shiro Hattori on the Occasion of His Sixtieth Birthday, Roman Jacobson & Shigeo Kawamoto, editors, (Tokyo: T.E.C. Corporation, 1970), 52–91.

Noam Chomsky, At War With Asia: Essays on Indochina, (New York: Pantheon, 1970).

Noam Chomsky, “Introduction,” Anarchism: From Theory to Practice, Daniel Guérin, Mary Klopper, translator, (New York: Monthly Review Press, 1970).

Noam Chomsky, Two Essays on Cambodia, (London: Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation, 1970).

Noam Chomsky, Problems of Knowledge and Freedom: The Russell Lectures, (New York: Pantheon Books, 1971).

Noam Chomsky, “Foreword,” Prevent the Crime of Silence: Reports From the Sessions of the International War Crimes Tribunal, (Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation, Ltd., 1971), ?

Noam Chomsky, Chomsky: Selected Readings, J.P.B. Allen and Paul van Buren, editors, (New York: Oxford University Press, 1971).

Noam Chomsky and Howard Zinn, editors, The Pentagon Papers: The Senator Gravel Edition, vol. 5, (Boston: Beacon Press, 1972).

Noam Chomsky, Language and Mind, (New York: Harcourt Brace & Company, 1972).

Noam Chomsky, Studies on Semantics in Generative Grammar (Janua Linguarum: Series Minor), (Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 1972).

Noam Chomsky, Problems of Knowledge and Freedom, (New York: Vintage Books, 1972).

Noam Chomsky, Topics in the Theory of Generative Grammar, (The Hague/Paris: Mouton, 1972).

Noam Chomsky, For Reasons of State, Arundhati Roy, forward, (New York: Pantheon Books, 1973).

Noam Chomsky, “Introduction," Language and Cognition, Robert S. Cohen, Olgierd Wojtasiewicz, translator, (New York: McGraw Hill, 1973).

Noam Chomsky, “Preface,” Cambodia in the Southeast Asian War, Malcolm Caldwell and Lek Tan, (New York: Monthly Review Press, 1973).

Noam Chomsky, The Backroom Boys, (London: Fontana/Collins, 1973).

Noam Chomsky, Peace in the Middle East? Reflections on Justice and Nationhood, (New York: Pantheon Books, 1974).

Noam Chomsky, “Human Nature: Justice Versus Power (Debate with Michel Foucault),” Fons Elders, editor, Reflexive Waters, (Toronto: J.M. Dent, 1974), ?

Noam Chomsky and Steve Weissman, Big Brother and the Holding Company: The World Behind Watergate, (Palo Alto, California: Ramparts Press, 1974).

Noam Chomsky and Gilbert Harman, On Noam Chomsky: Critical Essays, (New York: Doubelday, 1974).

Noam Chomsky, Reflections on Language, (New York: Pantheon Books, 1975).

Noam Chomsky, The Logical Structure of Linguistic Theory, (New York: Plenum Press, 1975). [1955–1956]

Noam Chomsky, “Introduction,” Cointelpro: The FBI’s Secret War on Political Freedom, Cathy Perkus, (New York: Monad Press, 1975).

Noam Chomsky, “Forward,” Arabs in Israel, Sabri Jiryis, (New York: Monthly Review Press, 1976).

Noam Chomsky, “Conditions on Rules of Grammar,” Linguistic Analysis, 2.4(1976): ?

Noam Chomsky, “Civilized Terrorism,” Seven Days, (July, 1976): 22–23.

Noam Chomsky, “Civilized Terrorism,” Palestine Digest, 6.7(October, 1976): ?

Noam Chomsky, “Introduction: Le clef de voute du system americain,” La crise de l'imperialisme et la troisieme guerre mondiale, Yann Fitt, Andre Farhi & Jean–Pierre Vigier, editeurs, (Paris: Francois Maspero, 1976), 5–26.

Noam Chomsky, Essays on Form and Interpretation, (New York: North Holland, 1977).

Noam Chomsky, “Conditions on Transformations,” Essays on Form and Interpretation, (New York: North Holland, 1977), 81–160.

Noam Chomsky and Edward S. Herman, “Distortions at Fourth Hand,” The Nation, 6 June 1977.

Noam Chomsky, “On wh–movement,” Formal Syntax, P. Culicover, T. Wasow & A. Akmagian, editors, (New York: Academic Press, 1977), 71–132.

Noam Chomsky, “Human Rights” and American Foreign Policy, (Nottingham: Spokesman Books, 1978).

Noam Chomsky, Intellectuals and the State: Johan Huizinga Lecture Given at the University of Leiden on 9 December 1977, (Baarn, The Netherlands: Het Wereldvenster Internationale B.V., 1978).

Noam Chomsky & Jean–Pierre Vigier, Verso la terza guerra mondiale? Sergio Mancini, translator, (Milano: Gabriele Mazzotta, 1978). [Paris, Francois Maspero, 1976]

Noam Chomsky, Political Economy of Human Rights: The Washington Connection and Third World Fascism, vol. 1, (Nottingham: Spokesman Books for the Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation Ltd., 1979).

Noam Chomsky, The Political Economy of Human Rights: After the Cataclysm: Postwar Indochina and the Reconstruction of Imperialist Ideology, vol. 2, (Boston, Massachusetts: South End Press, 1979).

Noam Chomsky, Outstandind Dissertations Series: The Morphophonemics of Modern Hebrew, revised edition, (New York: Garland, 1979). [1949]

Noam Chomsky and Edward S. Herman, The Political Economy of Human Rights, (Montréal: Black Rose Books, 1979).

Noam Chomsky, Language and Responsibility, (Sussex: The Harvester Press, 1979).

Noam Chomsky et Jean Piaget, Théories du langage: Théories de l’apprentissage: Le débat entre Jean Piaget et Noam Chomsky, (Paris: Éditions du Seuil, 1979).

Noam Chomsky and Geoffrey Sampson? Making Sense, (Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press, 1980).

Noam Chomsky and Edward S. Herman, The Washington Connection and Third World Fascism, (Boston, Massachusetts: South End Press, 1980).

Noam Chomsky, Studies in Semantics, (De Gruyter Mouton, 1980).

Noam Chomsky, Rules and Representations, (Oxford: Basil Blackwell New York: Columbia University Press, 1980).

Noam Chomsky and Edward S. Herman, After the Cataclysm: Postwar Indochina and Reconstruction of Imperial Ideology, (Sydney: Hale & Iremonger, 1980).

Noam Chomsky and Jean Piaget, Language and Learning: The Debate Between Jean Piaget and Noam Chomsky, Massimo Piattelli–Palmarini, editor, (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press,1980).

Noam Chomsky, “On Binding,” Linguistic Inquiry, 11.1(1980): 1–46.

Noam Chomsky, Towards a New Cold War: Essays on the Current Crisis and How We Got There, (New York: Pantheon, 1981).

Noam Chomsky, Lectures on Government and Binding: The Pisa Lectures, (Holland: Foris Publications, 1981).

Noam Chomsky, “The Faurisson Affair: His Right to Say It,” Nation, 28 April 1981, 231–234.

Noam Chomsky, Radical Priorities, Carlos–Peregrin Otero, editor, (Montréal: Black Rose Books, 1981).

Noam Chomsky, “Principles and Parameters in Syntactic Theory,” Hornstein & Lightfoot, (1981), 123–46.

Noam Chomsky, Jonathan Steele and John Gittings, Superpowers in Collision: The Cold War Now, (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1982).

Noam Chomsky, Some Concepts and Consequences of the Theory of Government and Binding, (Cambridge, Massachusetts: The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press, 1982).

Noam Chomsky, Noam Chomsky on the Generative Enterprise: A Discussion With Riny Huybregts and Henk van Riemsdijk, (Dordrecht: Foris Publications, 1982).

Noam Chomsky, The Fateful Triangle: The United States, Israel and the Palestinians, (Boston, Massachusetts: South End Press, 1983).

Noam Chomsky, Fateful Triangle: The United States, Israel and the Palestinians, (Boston, Massachusetts: South End Press, 1984).

Noam Chomsky, Écrits politiques: 1977–1983, (Peyrehorade, France: Acratie, 1984).

Noam Chomsky, Reponses inedites, (Paris: Spartacus, 1984).

Noam Chomsky, Modular Approaches to the Study of the Mind, (San Diego: San Diego State University Press, 1984).

Noam Chomsky, Thomas W. Simon, Graham Baugh, Alice Wexler and Marsha Hewitt, “Democratizing Eutopia,” Our Generation, 17.1(1985): ? [Montréal]

Noam Chomsky, “Crimes by Victims Are Called Terrorism,” These Times, 24 July–6 August 1985.

Noam Chomsky, Knowledge Of Language, (Westport: Praeger, 1986).

Noam Chomsky, “Middle East Terrorism and the US Ideological System,” Race and Class, 28.1(1986): ?

Noam Chomsky, “Visions of Righteousness,” Cultural Critique, 3(Spring, 1986): ?

Noam Chomsky, Barriers: Linguistic Inquiry, monograph 13, (Cambridge, Massachusetts: The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press, 1986).

Noam Chomsky, Pirates and Emperors: International Terrorism in the Real World, (Brattleboro, VT: Amana Books, 1986).

Noam Chomsky, Knowledge of Language: Its Nature, Origin, and Use, (Westport, Connecticut: Praeger Publishing, 1986).

Noam Chomsky, The Race to Destruction: Its Rational Basis, (1986).

Noam Chomsky, 1986, “All Denials of Free Speech Undercut a Democratic Society,” Journal of Historical Review, 7.1(Spring, 1986):123–127.

Noam Chomsky, The Chomsky Reader, James Peck, editor, (New York: Pantheon Books, 1987).

Noam Chomsky, Language in a Psychological Setting, (Tokyo: Sophia University, 1987).

Noam Chomsky, The Culture of Terrorism, (London: Pluto Press, 1988).

Noam Chomsky, The Chomsky Reader, (London: Serpnt’s Tail, 1988).

Noam Chomsky, Language and Politics, Carlos–Peregrin Otero, (Oakland, California: AK Press, 1988).

Noam Chomsky, "Lies of Our Times," (January 1, 1990):

Noam Chomsky, Deterring Democracy, (London: Verso Books, 1991).

Noam Chomsky, Terrorizing the Neighborhood: American Foreign Policy in the Post–Cold War Era, (San Francisco: AK Press & Pressure Drop Press, 1991).

Noam Chomsky, Necessary Illusions: Thought Control in Democratic Societies (CBC Massey Lectures), (London: Pluto Press, 1991).

Noam Chomsky, On U.S. Gulf Policy: Open Magazine Pamphlet Series, no. 1, (Westfield, New Jersey: Open Media, 1991).

Noam Chomsky, The New World Order: Open Magazine Pamphlet Series, no. 6, (Westfield, New Jersey: Open Media, 1991).

Noam Chomsky, “Some Notes on Economy of Derivation and Representation,” Principles and Parameters in Comparative Grammar, Robert Freidin, editor, (Cambridge, Massachusetts: The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press, 1991), ?

Noam Chomsky, “International Terrorism: Image and Reality,” Western State Terrorism, Alexander George, editor, (Oxford: Polity Press, 1991), 12–38.

Noam Chomsky, “'What We Say Goes’: The Middle East in the New World Order,” Collateral Damage: The “New World Order” at Home and Abroad, Cynthia Peters, editor, (Cambridge, Massachusetts: South End Press, 1992), ?

Noam Chomsky, “A View From Below,” Diplomatic History, 16.1(1992): ?

Noam Chomsky, Chronicles of Dissent: Interviewed by David Barsamian, (Vancouver: New Star Books, 1992).

Noam Chomsky, “Language and Mind: Challenges and Prospects,” (1992).

Noam Chomsky, Language and Thought, (Wakefield, Rhode Island: Moyer Bell, 1993).

Noam Chomsky, Enter a World That Is Truly Surreal, (Open Magazine Pamphlet Series, 1993).

Noam Chomsky, “Introduction,” NAFTA The New Rules of Corporate Conquest (Open Magazine, 24), Kristin Dawkins, (1993).

Noam Chomsky, World Order and Its Rules: Variations on Some Themes: West Belfast Economic for Mentation, (1993).

Noam Chomsky, Year 501: The Conquest Continues, (Boston, Massachusetts: South End Press, 1993).

Noam Chomsky, Keeping the Rabble in Line: Interviews with David Barsamian, (Common Courage Press, 1994).

Noam Chomsky, World Orders: Old and New, (Columbia University Press, 1994).

Noam Chomsky and Paul Farmer, Haití para qué, (Hiru, Hondarrubia, 1994).

Noam Chomsky, The Minimalist Program: Current Studies in Linguistics, (Cambridge, Massachusetts: The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press, 1995).

Noam Chomsky, Class Warfare, (London: Pluto Press, 1996).

Noam Chomsky, “Anarchism, Marxism and Hope For the Future,” Red and Black Revolution, 2(1996): ?

Noam Chomsky, Powers and Prospects: Reflections on Human Nature and the Social Order, (Boston, Massachusetts: South End Press, 1996).

Noam Chomsky, Media Control: The Spectacular Achievements of Propaganda, (New York: Seven Stories Press, 1997).

Noam Chomsky, “The Cold War and the University,” The Cold War and the University: Toward an Intellectual History of the Postwar Years, Ira Katznelson, Richard C. Lewontin, David Montgomery, Laura Nader, Richard Ohmann, Ray Siever, Immanuel Wallerstein and Howard Zinn, contributors, (New York: The New Press, 1997), 171–194.

Noam Chomsky, Perspectives on Power, (Montreal: Black Rose, 1997).

Noam Chomsky, Objectivity and Liberal Scholarship, (Detroit: Red & Black, 1997).

Noam Chomsky, The Common Good, (1998).

Noam Chomsky and Scott Burchill, “Human Nature, Freedom, and Political Community: An Interview With Noam Chomsky,” Citizenship Studies, 2.1(1998): 5–21.

Noam Chomsky, Rethinking Camelot: JFK, the Vietnam War and U.S. Political Culture, (Boston, Massachusetts: South End Press, 1999).

Noam Chomsky, The Culture of Terrorism, (Boston, MA: South End Press, 1999).

Noam Chomsky, “Language and the Brain,” Address at the European Conference on Cognitive Science, (Siena, October, 1999).

Noam Chomsky, The Third Way to the Servile State: Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation, (Spokesman Books, 1999).

Noam Chomsky, On Power and Ideology: The Managua Lectures, (Boston, Massachusetts: South End Press, 1999).

Noam Chomsky, The Umbrella of Power: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Contradiction of U.S. Policy, (New York: Seven Stories Press, 1999).

Noam Chomsky, Profit Over People: Neoliberalism and Global Order, Robert W. McChesney, introduction, (New York: Seven Stories Press, 1999).

Noam Chomsky and Edward Said, Acts of Aggression: Policing “Rogue” States, (1999).

Noam Chomsky, The New Military Humanism: Lessons from Kosovo (Monroe, Maine: Common Courage Press, 1999).

Noam Chomsky, “US Iraq Policy: Motives and Consequences,” A. Arnove, editor, Iraq Under Siege, (Cambridge, Massachusetts: South End, 2000).

Noam Chomsky, New Horizons in the Study of Language and Mind, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000).

Noam Chomsky, editor, The Architecture of Language, Rama Kant Agnihotri, Nirmalangshu Mukherji & Bibudhendra Narayan Patnaik, editors, (New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2000).

Noam Chomsky, Elections 2000: Les schémas du vote et de l’abstention, traduit de l’anglais et annoté par Henri Galinon,
(Arles: Éditions Sulliver, 2001).

Noam Chomsky, 9–11, (New York: Seven Stories Press, 2001).

Noam Chomsky and Suzy Hansen, “The Nation’s Most Implacable Critic of U.S. Foreign Policy Argues That the War is Unjust, America Is the Biggest Terrorist State and Intellectuals Always Support Official Violence,” Salon.com, 16 January 2001.

Noam Chomsky, “Forward to the New Edition,” Vietnam Inc., Philip Jones Griffiths, (New York: Phaidon, 2001).

Noam Chomsky and David Barsamian, Propaganda and the Public Mind, (Boston, Massachusetts: South End Press, 2001).

Noam Chomsky, Rogue States: The Rule of Force in World Affairs, (London: Pluto Press, 2001).

Noam Chomsky, On Nature and Language, Adriana Belletti and Luigi Rizzi, editors, (2001).

Noam Chomsky, Milan Rai, Emily Johns and Kim Weston–Arnold, War Plan Iraq: Ten Reasons Against War With Iraq, (London: Verso Books, 2002).

Noam Chomsky, W.T. Fitch and M.D. Hauser, “The Faculty of Language: What Is It, Who Has It, and How Did It Evolve?” Science, 298(2002): 1569–1579.

Noam Chomsky, What Uncle Sam Really Wants, (Tucson, Arizona: Odonian Press, 2002).

Noam Chomsky, The New Military Humanism: Lessons From Kosovo, (Monroe, Maine: Common Courage Press, 2002).

Noam Chomsky, Understanding Power: The Indispensable Chomsky, (New York: New Press, 2002).

Noam Chomsky, Chomsky on Democracy and Education, (Routledge, 2002).

Noam Chomsky, Secrets, Lies and Democracy, (Tucson, Arizona: Odonian Press, 2002).

Noam Chomsky, American Power and the New Mandarins, (New York: The New Press, 2002).

Noam Chomsky, Heinz Dieterich, Denise Glasbeek and Julian Sempill, Latin America: From Colonization to Globalization, (Mitchell, Australia: Ocean Press, 2002).

Noam Chomsky and David Barsamian, Class Warfare: Interviews with David Barsamian, (Monroe, Maine: Common Courage Press, 2002). [1996]

Noam Chomsky, On Nature and Language, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002).

Noam Chomsky, Syntactic Structures, 2nd edition, David W. Lightfoot, introduction, (New York/Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2002).

Noam Chomsky, Peering into the Abyss of the Future, (New Delhi: Institute of Social Sciences, 2002).

Noam Chomsky, Hegemony or Survival: America’s Quest for Global Dominance, (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2003).

Noam Chomsky, Power and Terror: Post–9/11 Talks and Interviews, (New York: Seven Stories Press, 2003).

Noam Chomsky and Edward S. Herman, Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media, (New York: Pantheon, 2003).

Noam Chomsky, Middle East Illusions: Including Peace in the Middle East? Reflections on Justice and Nationhood, (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2003). [1974]

Noam Chomsky, Objectivity and Liberal Scholarship, (New York: The New Press, 2003).

Noam Chomsky and Edward Herman, Letters from Lexington: Reflections on Propaganda, (Routledge, 2004).

Noam Chomsky, Language and Politics, Carlos–Peregrin Otero, (Oakland, California: AK Press, 2004). [1988]

Noam Chomsky, Imperial Ambitions, (London: Hamish Hamilton Ltd., 2005).

Noam Chomsky, Howard Zinn and William Blum, et. alia, Superpower Principles: U.S. Terrorism Against Cuba, Salim Lamrani, editor, (Monroe, ME: Common Courage Press, 2005).

Chomsky Noam and Foucault Michel, The Chomsky–Foucault Debate on Human Nature, (New York: The New Press, 2006).

Noam Chomsky, Failed States: The Abuse of Power and the Assault on Democracy, (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2006).

Noam Chomsky, Interventions, (London: Hamish Hamilton Ltd., 2007).

Noam Chomsky, What We Say Goes: Conversations on U.S. Power in a Changing World, (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2007).

Noam Chomsky, The Essential Chomsky, (New York: The New Press, 2008).

Noam Chomsky, Gilbert Achcar and Stephan R. Shalom, Perilous Power: The Middle East and U.S. Foreign Policy Dialogues on Terror, Democracy, War, and Justice, (Routledge, 2008).

Noam Chomsky, Of Minds and Language: A Dialogue With Noam Chomsky in the Basque Country, Massimo Piattelli–Palmarini, Pello Salaburu and Juan Uriagereka, editors, (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009).

Noam Chomsky, Hopes and Prospects, (London: Hamish Hamilton Ltd., 2010).

Noam Chomsky, Gaza in Crisis: Reflections on Israel’s War Against the Palestinians, (London: Hamish Hamilton Ltd., 2010).

Noam Chomsky, Lois Meyer and Benjamín Maldonado Alvarado, editors, New World of Indigenous Resistance, (San Francisco, California: City Lights Publishers, 2010).

Noam Chomsky and Howard Zinn, Theory And Practice: Conversations with Noam Chomsky and Howard Zinn, (PM Press, 2010).

Noam Chomsky, Making the Future: The Unipolar Imperial Moment, (San Francisco, California: City Lights Publishers, 2010).

Noam Chomsky, John Junkerman and Takei Masakazu, Power and Terror: Conflict, Hegemony, and the Rule of Force, (Routledge, 2011).

Noam Chomsky, New Generation Draws the Line: Kosovo, East Timor, and the ‘Responsibility to Protect’ Today, (Routledge, 2011).

Noam Chomsky, Arthur Naiman, David Barsamian, How the World Works, (Soft Skull Press, 2011).

Noam Chomsky and Ilan Pappe Gaza in Crisis: Reflections on Israel’s War Against the Palestinians, (London: Penguin Books Ltd, 2011).

Noam Chomsky, 9–11: Was There An Alternative? (New York: Seven Stories Press, 2011).

Noam Chomsky, Making the Future: Occupations, Interventions, Empire and Resistance, (Penguin, 2012).

Noam Chomsky, The Science of Language: Interviews with James McGilvray, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012).

Noam Chomsky, Power Systems: Conversations on Global Democratic Uprisings and the New Challenges to U.S. Empire, (Macmillan, 2012).

Noam Chomsky, Occupy, (London: Penguin, 2012).

Noam Chomsky, Morphophonemics of Modern Hebrew, (Routledge, 2012).

Noam Chomsky, Edward S. Herman, Richard A. Falk, Judith Butler, Ted Honderich, Norman Finkelstein and Gilbert Achcar, Weapon of the Strong: Conversations on US State Terrorism, (London: Pluto Press, 2012).

Noam Chomsky, On Anarchism, (New York: The New Press, 2013).

Noam Chomsky and Heinz Dieterich, Power Systems: Conversations on Global Democratic Uprisings and the New Challenges to US Empire, (London: Penguin/Hamish Hamilton Ltd., 2013).

Noam Chomsky and André Vltchek, On Western Terrorism: From Hiroshima to Drone Warfare, (Toronto: Between the Lines, 2013).

Noam Chomsky and Edward S. Herman, After the Cataclysm: The Political Economy of Human Rights, vol. 2, (Chicago: Haymarket Books, 2014).

Noam Chomsky and Pierre W. Orelus, On Language, Democracy, and Social Justice: Noam Chomsky’s Critical Intervention, Foreword by Peter McLaren, Afterword by Pepi Leistyna,_ (Peter Lang Publishing Inc., 2014).

Noam Chomsky, Power Systems: Conversations with David Barsamian on Global Democratic Uprisings and the New Challenges to U.S. Empire, (Penguin, 2014).

Noam Chomsky, Democracy and Power: The Delhi Lectures, (Open Book Publishers, 2014).

Noam Chomsky, Masters of Mankind: Essays and Lectures, 1969–2013, (2014).

Noam Chomsky, Powers and Prospects: Reflections on Nature and the Social Order, (Chicago: Haymarket Books, 2015).

Noam Chomsky, Propaganda and the Public Mind: Interviews by David Barsamian, (London: Pluto Press, 2015).

Noam Chomsky and David Barsamian, Propaganda and the Public Mind: Conversations With Noam Chomsky, (Chicago: Haymarket Books, 2015).

Noam Chomsky, Turning the Tide: U.S. Intervention in Central America and the Struggle For Peace, (Chicago: Haymarket Books, 2015).

Noam Chomsky, Democracy and Power: The Delhi Lectures, (I.P.D. Alternatives, 2015).

Noam Chomsky, Because We Say So, (2015).

Noam Chomsky, Who Rules The World? (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2016).

Noam Chomsky and Robert C. Berwick, Why Only Us: Language and Evolution, (Cambridge, Massachusetts: The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press, 2016).

Noam Chomsky, Hainer Kober und Norbert Juraschitz, Wer beherrscht die Welt? Die globalen Verwerfungen der amerikanischen Politik, (Ullstein Buchverlage, 2016).

Noam Chomsky, Requiem for the American Dream: The 10 Principles of Concentration of Wealth and Power, (New York: Seven Stories Press, 2017).
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NOAM CHOMSKY VERSUS THE HOLOCAUST

“[Noam Chomsky] forfeited authority as a political commentator by a series of actions widely regarded as ill–judged (repeated polemics minimizing the Khmer Rouge atrocities in Cambodia; endorsement of a book which Chomsky admitted he had not read that denied the historical reality of the Jewish Holocaust).”

Geoffrey Sampson, “Censoring ‘20th Century Culture’: The Case of Noam Chomsky,” New Criterion, 3.2(1984): 7–16.

See: Werner Cohen, Partners in Hate: Noam Chomsky and the Holocaust Deniers, Cambridge, 1995.
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SAUL KRIPKE VERSUS THE HOLOCAUST (CONTRA KRIPKE)
Adolf Hitler might not have been a mass murderer, according to Saul Kripke, the famous Harvard logician. At least this is the verdict of Kripke's theory of language and logic, namely, his doctrine of possible worlds and rigid designators:

"Aristotle's most important properties consist in his philosophical work, and Hitler's in his murderous political role; both, as I have said, might have lacked these properties altogether. Surely there was no logical fate hanging over either Aristotle or Hitler which made it in any sense inevitable that they should have possessed the properties we regard as important to them; they could have had careers completely different from their actual ones ... I say that a designator is rigid, and designates the same thing in all possible worlds." (1)

If Adolf Hitler might not have been evil, then the Holocaust, according to Kripkean theory, might never have happened ?

"When I hear the name 'Hitler,' I do feel it's sort of analytic that the man was evil. But really, probably not. Hitler might have spent all his days in quiet in Linz." (2)

But Hitler was a mass murderer and no amount of Kripkean sophistry will ever erase the fact: The Holocaust is an inescapable lesson of exact historiography and world history, and neither Saul Kripke nor his possible worlds and rigid designators will ever change the logical, linguistic and historical fact.

Yet, according to Saul Kripke, talk about possibilities, in accordance with rigid designators, will get one from A to B, and also get one wherever else one wants to go (especially in politics and economics). Obviously exact historiography and world history are outside the domain of Kripkean theory (not to mention traditional morality), unless we prefer to replace historical truth and reality with Kripkean revisionist (sophistical) historiography: "Hitler might have spent all his days in quiet in Linz ... I say that a designator is rigid, and designates the same thing in all possible worlds." (3)

Exact historiography and world history tell an altogether different tale: "[Adolf Hitler] was one of the most evil men in world history." (4) The question therefore quite naturally arises: Is Saul Kripke, like William Alexander Jenks, famous for his great works of historical and biographical erudition ?

The correct answer to this last question brings in train another consideration: The rational distinction between exact and inexact historiography in the realm of world history is not divorced from the science of logic and linguistics. Certainly it is not the case the realm of ultimate logical and linguistic reality is unintelligible and that something unknowable exists: "The ultimate ground of logic is the realm of truth without veil, the system of pure reason and the world of pure thought." (5)

Saul Kripke is a famous American Sophist (Kantian), like Richard Rorty, Noam Chomsky and Willard Van Orman Quine, and one of the most influential peddlers of modern European irrationalism in America during the last half of the 20th century.


WORKS CITED
1. Saul Kripke, "Naming and Necessity," Semantics of Natural Language, Donald Davidson and Gilbert Harman, editors, Dordrecht, 1972, 289.
2. Kripke, Ibidem, 288.
3. Kripke, Ibidem, 288-289.
4. William Alexander Jenks, "Adolf Hitler," The World Book Encyclopedia, vol. 9, Chicago, 1971, 236. See: W.A. Jenks, Vienna and the Young Hitler, New York, 1960.
5. Georg Wilhem Friedrich Hegel, “Einleitung,” Wissenschaft der Logik: Die objective Logik, erster Band, Nürnberg, 1812, xiii.
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MARTIN HEIDEGGER & MODERN EUROPEAN IRRATIONALISM

"The most beautiful part of it is that I am beginning actually to love Kant. I am grateful that fate has kept me from spoiling Kant and Hegel ..."
MARTIN HEIDEGGER, 1925

"Kant's Critique of Pure Reason is among those philosophical works which daily become inexhaustible anew ..."
MARTIN HEIDEGGER

*What does modern European political and economic irrationalism in the 20th century tell us about the critical path of criticism, especially in the critiques of Western civilisation by Lenin, Hitler, Stalin and Mao ?
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AMERICAN IDEALISM VERSUS NOAM CHOMSKY
Christopher Richard Wade Dettling (2016)

Idealists whose minds are attuned to the rational conception of right found in the Magna Carta and the Constitution of the United States of America, the American notion of Global freedom in the world of today, will immediately understand the bankruptcy of modern European unreason in the passages that follow; American Idealists will recognize the outdated Napoleonic and French revolutionary conception of right, and they will immediately know, beyond all doubt, exactly why Noam Chomsky is a dangerous philosophical sophist whose anti–American ideology has fanned the flames of terrorism and violence across the globe, from Europe to the Middle East, via South East Asia to Latin America: How many American lives have been ruined or destroyed because of anti–Americanism around the world, and how much pain and suffering has been unleashed upon America thanks to the anti–American ideology of Noam Chomsky and his followers?

"Chomsky did not say that the US government is a Nazi terror regime ... intellectuals in power systems line up to sing the praises of those in power, and that we represent the righteous course of history. This is precisely what every major power has done and said, without exception, from Nazi Germany to Imperial Japan to Colonial Britain."
Glen MacPherson, 2016

A: ?
B: ?
C: Therefore, "Chomsky did not say that the US government is a Nazi terror regime."

Intellectuals in power systems line up to sing the praises of those in power, and that we represent the righteous course of history. This is precisely what every major power has done and said, without exception, from Nazi Germany to Imperial Japan to Colonial Britain: Therefore Noam Chomsky did not say that the US government is a Nazi terror regime?

"Therefore, according to Noam Chomsky the Government of the United States of America is a Nazi Terror Regime" = Chomsky did say that the US government is a Nazi terror regime ?

"If they do it it's terrorism, if we do it it’s counter–terrorism. That’s an historical universal: Go back to Nazi propaganda the most extreme mass murders ever. If you look at Nazi propaganda, it’s exactly what they said: They said they are defending the populations and the legitimate governments of Europe like Vichy from the terrorist partisans who are directed from London, that’s the basic propaganda line ... We did it therefore it’s a just cause: You can read that in the Nazi archives too."
Noam Chomsky [Transcript]

"Chomsky did not [merely] say that the US government is a Nazi terror regime" and "[some] intellectuals in [some] power systems [sometimes] line up to sing the praises of [some of] those in power, and that [sometimes] we represent the righteous course of [some] history. This is precisely what every major power has [sometimes] done and said, without exception, from Nazi Germany to Imperial Japan to Colonial Britain."

Therefore, according to Noam Chomsky the Government of the United States of America is a Nazi Terror Regime, i.e., he implies that Washington is a Nazi Terror Regime:

Noam Chomsky, Terrorizing the Neighborhood: American Foreign Policy in the Post–Cold War Era, (San Francisco: AK Press & Pressure Drop Press, 1991).

Noam Chomsky, The Culture of Terrorism, (South End Press, 1999).

Noam Chomsky, The Umbrella of Power: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Contradiction of U.S. Policy, (New York: Seven Stories Press, 1999).

Noam Chomsky, Heinz Dieterich, Denise Glasbeek and Julian Sempill, Latin America: From Colonization to Globalization, (Ocean Press, 2002).

Noam Chomsky, Hegemony or Survival: America’s Quest for Global Dominance, (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2003).

Noam Chomsky, Power and Terror: Post–9/11 Talks and Interviews, (New York: Seven Stories Press, 2003).

Noam Chomsky, Imperial Ambitions, (London: Hamish Hamilton Ltd., 2005).

Noam Chomsky, Howard Zinn and William Blum, et. alia, Superpower Principles: U.S. Terrorism Against Cuba, Salim Lamrani, editor, (Monroe, ME: Common Courage Press, 2005).

Noam Chomsky, Failed States: The Abuse of Power and the Assault on Democracy, (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2006).

Noam Chomsky, John Junkerman and Takei Masakazu Power and Terror: Conflict, Hegemony, and the Rule of Force, (Routledge, 2011).

Noam Chomsky and Heinz Dieterich, Power Systems: Conversations on Global Democratic Uprisings and the New Challenges to US Empire, (London: Penguin / Hamish Hamilton Ltd., 2013).

Noam Chomsky and André Vltchek, On Western Terrorism: From Hiroshima to Drone Warfare, (Toronto: Between the Lines, 2013).
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CHOMSKY AND HISTORY

"If they do it it's terrorism, if we do it it's counter-terrorism. That's an historical universal: Go back to Nazi propaganda the most  extreme mass murders ever. If you look at Nazi propaganda, it's exactly what they said: They said they are defending the populations and the legitimate governments of Europe like Vichy from the terrorist partisans who are directed from London, that's the basic propaganda line ... We did it therefore it's a just cause: You can read that in the Nazi archives too." NOAM CHOMSKY [TRANSCRIPT]

*Is it really and truly an "historical universal" that "if they [the terrorists] do it, it's terrorism, if we [Washington and the West] do it it's counter-terrorism [and not terrorism] ... If you look at Nazi propaganda, it's exactly what they said ... We did it therefore it's a just cause [and not an unjust cause]."

*Is it really and truly an "historical universal" that the the "basic propaganda line" of Washington and the West is no better than Nazism and terrorism ?

*Is it really and truly an "historical universal" that Washington and the West stand for nothing better than Nazism and terrorism ?

*Does professor Chomsky ever advance a rational argument in favor of his distinction between the historically universal and the historically particular ?

Professor Chomsky is a modern irrationalist, and Chomskyianism is the last influential school of 20th century modern European irrationalism in America: The most powerful philosophers of the 21st century will uphold Globalism, and follow in the footsteps of Descartes, Spinoza, Berkeley and Hegel. And for very good reason ...
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KARL MARX & MODERN IRRATIONALISM

"To Hegel, the life process of the human brain is the demiurgos of the real world, and the real world is only the external, phenomenal form of 'the Idea' ... it [the Hegelian Dialectic] includes in its comprehension and affirmative recognition of the existing state of things, at the same time also, the recognition of the negation of that state, of its inevitable breaking up ; because it [the Hegelian Dialectic] regards every historically-developed social form as in fluid movement, and therefore takes into account its transient nature not less than its momentary existence ; because it [the Hegelian Dialectic] lets nothing impose upon it, and is in its essence critical and revolutionary."
[KARL MARX]

*Does Karl Marx ever advance a rational argument, the conclusion of which is, therefore "to Hegel, the life process of the human brain is the demiurgos of the real world, and the real world is only the external, phenomenal form of 'the Idea'" ?

*Is the statement of Karl Marx, attributed to Hegel, that "the life process of the human brain is the demiurgos of the real world, and the real world is only the external, phenomenal form of 'the Idea,'" found in the publications of Hegel, in either the English or German editions ?

*Marx holds that "[the Hegelian Dialectic] regards every historically-developed social form as in fluid movement," but does he mean Hegel's philosophy of history, or his philosophy of history and the "historical-development" found in the Lecture Notes ? 

*Does Marx's statement , "[the Hegelian Dialectic] is in its essence critical and revolutionary," square with the teachings of Eduard Gans and the School of German Idealism that "Kant's philosophy is a high one ... the march of God in the world, that is what the state is" ?

*What exactly is the "critical and revolutionary" role of the Hegelian dialectic of Marxism in 20th century world history, in the collapse of modernity and rise of Globalism ?

"The road beyond German Idealism is very long, and many have fallen by the wayside: The sacrifices are very great ... follow the road of American Ideas and you will see the light of day."
Christopher Richard Wade Dettling, 2015
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AMERICANISM VERSUS ANARCHISM

American Idealism has no lesson to learn from those anarchists who preach the virtues of anarchism and also uphold taxation, social security and old age pensions: They are untrue to themselves and they betray their followers.

Obviously their theory is in gross contradiction with their practise.

American Idealism also has no lesson to learn from those anarchists who preach the virtues of anarchism and do not uphold taxation, social security and old age pensions: Although they are true to themselves, and although they do not betray their followers, their practise leads nowhere, except to a cave or street corner.

Anarchism is therefore the stuff of feeble minds.

American Idealists espouse the theory and practise of Americanism. 
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