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On the Feast of St Bruno I reflect on his letter to the #Carthusians of Chartreuse

“My brothers, I am most serious in this request, at once both humble and insistent, that you manifest by your deeds the love you bear in your heart for your prior and beloved father by kindly and attentively providing him with everything he needs for the various requirements of his health. He may be unwilling to agree to what your loving solicitude may dictate, preferring to jeopardize his health and life rather than be found lacking in some point of external observance. This is after all normally not permitted, and he, since he holds the first place among you, might be ashamed to fail in these matters, fearing lest some of you become negligent or lukewarm on his account. Yet I think there is hardly any danger of that, and so I hereby grant you the necessary authority to take my place in this regard and to respectfully compel him to accept whatever you accord him for his health.”
(Letter to Chartreuse)

I think that in this message from St Bruno to the community at Chartreuse, which he himself had founded, we can get a glimpse of the charisma with which he was able to persuade so many people to join the most austere of all the Catholic monastic orders. Landwin (or Landuino) the prior of Chartreuse had travelled to the Saint in Calabria, a difficult and dangerous journey in lawless times, to see him and get instructions from him. This trip had taken its toll on the prior who was in precarious health anyway. Bruno compassionating his friend and subordinate wished to keep him in Calabria to spare him the hardship of the long return journey and the strain of managing a community upon his return, Bruno had, moreover, the authority to order him to stay. Nonetheless seeing the sorrow that Landwin felt at his separation from the brethren the Saint found an ingenious and loving way to allow him to return to his own Charterhouse yet at the same time ensure that he was properly cared for.....

https://www.wattpad.com/478442361-random-catholic-thoughts-bruno-the-carthusian

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The Carthusian Option

I will hear what the Lord God will speak in me
(Psalm 84:9)

The earliest martyrs of the English 'Reformation' begun by Henry VIII were Carthusian monks. They were executed because of their loyalty to the Apostolic See in Rome. There is something richly symbolic in the fact that an order which is committed to contemplating the things of God and whose motto is Stat crux dum volvitur orbis ( the Cross stands firm while the world turns) was the first to apprehend what Henry's plan would lead to.

Another monastic order, the Benedictines, have as the first words of their Rule "Listen carefully." This word 'listen' may indeed be the Benedict Option which the world, and particularly the Christians who inhabit it, may most need to exercise. Paradoxically the best environment to enable one to hear is silence.

We are accustomed to making our decisions, big or small, in the midst of a cacophony of noise. Not simply the external noise generated by things but also the internal noise generated by our mind's leaping from thought to thought, impulse to impulse, stimulus to stimulus. The choices so made may be good or bad but they share one characteristic; they are hurried..

http://catholicscot.blogspot.co.uk/2017/04/the-carthusian-option.html
The Carthusian Option
The Carthusian Option
catholicscot.blogspot.co.uk

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How God Distributes His Gifts - Part 6 of 8

Jesus promised he would not leave us orphans (John 14:18) but would send the Holy Spirit to guide and protect us (John 15:26). He gave the sacraments to heal, feed, and strengthen us.

The seven sacraments are not just symbols. They are signs that actually convey God's grace and love. They were foreshadowed in the Old Testament by things that did not actually convey grace but merely symbolized it. Circumcision, for example, prefigured baptism, and the Passover meal prefigured the Eucharist. When Christ came, He did not do away with symbols of God's grace. He super naturalized them, energizing them with grace. He made them more than symbols.

Matrimony
(Catechism of the Catholic Church 1601 – 1666)

Most people are called to the married life rather than to the religious life or to life as a single person. Through the sacrament of matrimony God gives special graces to help married couples with life's difficulties, especially to help them raise their children as loving followers of Christ.

Marriage always involves three parties: the bride, the groom, and God. When two Christians receive the sacrament of matrimony, God is with them, witnessing and blessing their marriage covenant. For Catholics, God does this through the priest or deacon who presides at the wedding as the Church's witness.

A consummated sacramental marriage is permanent; only death can break it (Mark 10:1 – 12, Romans 7:2 – 3, 1 Corinthians 7:10 – 11). This holy union is a living symbol of the unbreakable relationship between Christ and his Church (Ephesians 5:21 – 33).
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Family retreat with the Carthusian monks: "A sign in the hallway outside the tiny chapel proclaims: "In solitude one lives in all ages." As attractive as it may seem, the thousand-year-old Carthusian way of life isn't for everyone. Some people sign up for a three-month retreat at the monastery, only to give up and return home after a single day."

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#Resurrection
#Hope
#StartingInTheBeginning
 
When did you start believing in the hope of resurrection?  Revelations or in Geneses, it is always best to start in the beginning.   https://youtu.be/Tf-KG9uLhb8

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I thought I would post this here because it includes an anecdote about a Carthusian monk that I met when I was a novice at Parkminster Charterhouse that people might find interesting.
Wide Horizons, Narrow Visions
Wide Horizons, Narrow Visions
thoughtfullydetached.wordpress.com

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"Only those who have experienced the solitude and the silence of the wilderness can know the benefit and divine joy they bring to those who love them."  - St. Bruno
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We are to be free within; our souls are not to be cluttered up with noise and sterile activities, but attentive and ready to detect signs, sometimes so delicate, of the presence of the Lord speaking in our heart.

Let go of human wisdom, calculated prudence, and your own little projects, so that you can be taken up into the light of the truth.  Implacably, this light will reveal all the cunning tricks and resistances that the ‘old’ man in you uses to defend himself and remain in control.  You must accept to see him disappear if you really want to be born anew, and to receive a new life welling up from the depths of your heart, where God has always been present without you knowing it.

A Carthusian
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