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Supermassive black hole

This artist’s impression depicts a rapidly spinning supermassive black hole surrounded by an accretion disc. This thin disc of rotating material consists of the leftovers of a Sun-like star which was ripped apart by the tidal forces of the black hole. Shocks in the colliding debris as well as heat generated in accretion led to a burst of light, resembling a supernova explosion.

Credit: ESA/Hubble, ESO, M. Kornmesser

Facebook Astronomy blog: https://www.facebook.com/nightskyuniverse/
Supermassive black hole

This artist’s impression depicts a rapidly spinning supermassive black hole surrounded by an accretion disc. This thin disc of rotating material consists of the leftovers of a Sun-like star which was ripped apart by the tidal forces of the black hole. Shocks in the colliding debris as well as heat generated in accretion led to a burst of light, resembling a supernova explosion.

Credit: ESA/Hubble, ESO, M. Kornmesser

Facebook Astronomy blog: https://www.facebook.com/nightskyuniverse/
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Gravitational waves eject black hole from galaxy

This illustration shows how two supermassive black holes merged to form a single black hole which was then ejected from its parent galaxy.

Credit:

NASA, ESA/Hubble, and A. Feild/STScI


Facebook Astronomy blog: https://www.facebook.com/nightskyuniverse/


#universe #galaxy #telescope #space #ESO #NASA #stars
Gravitational waves eject black hole from galaxy

This illustration shows how two supermassive black holes merged to form a single black hole which was then ejected from its parent galaxy.

Panel 1: Two galaxies are interacting and finally merging with each other. The supermassive black holes in their centres are attracted to each other.

Panel 2: As soon as the supermassive black holes get close they start orbiting each other, in the process creating strong gravitational waves.

Panel 3: As they radiate away gravitational energy the black holes move closer to each other over time and finally merge.

Panel 4: If the two black holes do not have the same mass and rotation rate, they emit gravitational waves more strongly along one direction. When the two black holes finally collide, they stop producing gravitational waves and the newly merged black hole then recoils in the opposite direction to the strongest gravitational waves and is shot out of its parent galaxy.

Credit:

NASA, ESA/Hubble, and A. Feild/STScI


Facebook Astronomy blog: https://www.facebook.com/nightskyuniverse/


#universe #galaxy #telescope #space #ESO #NASA #stars
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New research finds a drastic reduction in fertility rates

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A stellar fingerprint of a star waiting to be born

Showcased at the centre of this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image is an emission-line star
A stellar fingerprint of a star waiting to be born

Showcased at the centre of this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image is an emission-line star known as IRAS 12196-6300.

Located just under 2300 light-years from Earth, this star displays prominent emission lines, meaning that the star’s light, dispersed into a spectrum, shows up as a rainbow of colours marked with a characteristic pattern of dark and bright lines. The characteristics of these lines, when compared to the “fingerprints” left by particular atoms and molecules, can be used to reveal IRAS 12196-6300’s chemical composition.

Under 10 million years old and not yet burning hydrogen at its core, unlike the Sun, this star is still in its infancy. Further evidence of IRAS 12196-6300’s youth is provided by the presence of reflection nebulae. These hazy clouds, pictured floating above and below IRAS 12196-6300, are created when light from a star reflects off a high concentration of nearby dust, such as the dusty material still remaining from IRAS 12196-6300’s formation.

Credit:

ESA/Hubble & NASA
Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt (Geckzilla)
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Lensed Quasar

RXJ1131-1231 is among the five best lensed quasars discovered to date. The foreground galaxy smears the image of the background quasar into a bright arc (left) and creates a total of four images — three of which can be seen within the arc.

Credit:

ESA/Hubble, NASA, Suyu et al.

Universe & Astronomy on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nightskyuniverse/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/astronomysight
Lensed Quasar

RXJ1131-1231 is among the five best lensed quasars discovered to date. The foreground galaxy smears the image of the background quasar into a bright arc (left) and creates a total of four images — three of which can be seen within the arc.

Credit:

ESA/Hubble, NASA, Suyu et al.

Universe & Astronomy on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nightskyuniverse/
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