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FROM “ON GRAIL CHRISTIANITY”

“…Perhaps the greatest mystery involved in an examination of the life of Christ is what to make of the so-called “missing years.” Some of those, who have been willing to publish their speculations, suggest that during those missing years Jesus traveled to far reaches of the ancient world, including Roman-era England, India and perhaps other locales. For those that argue that there is no Biblical proof that other than the early exile of the Holy Family in Egypt, that Christ was not always present in the Holy Land. It does seem likely, however, that the totality of the life of Christ could not be fully contained within the Gospels. Indeed in John 21:25, John clearly admits he has just scratched the surface of what Christ accomplished on earth: “Jesus did many other things as well. If every one of them were written down, I suppose that even the whole world would not have room for the books that could be written.”

While not discounting a mission to India or elsewhere, the strongest tradition that contends that during the missing years, Christ visited Roman-era England on at least one, and perhaps two occasions. These traditions have it that Jesus Christ visited Glastonbury, in Somerset in the west of England, first was as a youth and later just prior to his mission to the Holy Land. These days Glastonbury is most famous for its massive annual music festival.

The legend goes that when Jesus was 12 years old, Joseph, the stepfather of Jesus, died. His guardianship then became the responsibility of Joseph of Arimathea, who was an uncle of the Virgin Mary. Joseph of Arimathea, it was reported, was a trader who sailed all over the known world in Phoenician vessels. In the west of England, Joseph of Arimathea, sailed to Glastonbury, which was at that time, the principal trading center for tin, lead, copper, and perhaps gold in the ancient world.

The tradition, is according to Reverend Sean Manchester, author of The Grail Church, is embraced in areas as disparate as India, the west of Ireland, Cornwell, Somerset, Gloucestershire and the Maronite Christians of Lebanon. The legend tells that while in Glastonbury, Jesus and Joseph of Arimathea constructed what may well have been the first Christian church in existence. Bishop Manchester also quotes the first British historian, Gildas Baronicus (516-570), who spent his last years at Glastonbury as writing that, “Christ, the True Sun, afforded His Light, the knowledge of his precepts, to this island during the height of, or the last year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar.” Tiberius Caesar reigned from 14 A.D. to 37 A.D.

The construction of the church may have occurred during a winter during which rough seas prevented Joseph and Jesus from sailing for home. The church, now referred to as the “Wattle Church,” has long since deteriorated, although its location is now the site of the “Lady Chapel” of Glastonbury Abbey. The Lady Chapel is so named because legend has it that Christ dedicated the Wattle Church to His mother. Indeed when church fathers planned to dedicate the Wattle Church, St. David reported a dream in which Jesus told them that the Wattle Church had been previously dedicated to His mother and should not be re-dedicated. Though the re-dedication never occurred, Paulinus, a companion of St. Augustine is reported to have placed boards over the Wattle Church to better preserve it.

https://www.amazon.com/Grail-Christianity-R-Roy-Blake-ebook/dp/B01M0MKHJ5/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1480533163&sr=8-1&keywords=on+grail+christianity

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THE 12 HIDES OF GLASTONBURY (FROM “ON GRAIL CHRISTIANITY”)

In 708 A.D. William of Malmesbury quoted the famous charter memorialized in nursery rhymes and more well known as the 12 Hides of Glastonbury. The 12 Hides were granted by King Ina to Joseph of Arimathea and/or his descendants and included all of Glastonbury, then an island surrounded the sea and associated marshland.

The 12 Hides read, ‘To the ancient Church, situated in the place called Glastonbury, which Church the Great High Priest and Chiefest Minister formerly through His own ministry and that of Angels, sanctified by many an unheard of miracle, to Himself and the ever-Virgin Mary, as was formerly revealed to St. David, do grant…” The oldest known map of the 12 Hides of Glastonbury is entitled “A Map of the Hundreds of Glaston (Glastonbury) XII Hides, Whitstone and Wells Forum.” In addition, to Glastonbury and “Tor Hill,” the map also shows the towns of Wells, West Bradley, North Wolton and the Mendip Hills, the source of the mines that gave Glastonbury its ancient mineral wealth.


https://www.amazon.com/Grail-Christianity-R-Roy-Blake-ebook/dp/B01M0MKHJ5/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1479238231&sr=8-1&keywords=on+grail+christianity

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Most theologies tell us that absent divine intervention, at death few if any of us would be absolutely pure of heart and sufficiently sinless to be with God in heaven. Likewise, few of us would be evil enough to deserve hell. Logic would seem to say that if the only two possibilities that are known to exist account for very few cases, a third possibility is very likely. Certainly the idea that the vast majority of humans would be consigned to hell suggests a vengeful and unfeeling God, the kind of God that I, and many others, refuse to believe exists.

In researching the subject I found that the idea of reincarnation and Christianity was never thought completely laughable. Indeed, one of the founders and martyrs of Christianity, Origen of Alexandria, firmly believed in Christianity and reincarnation, although Origenism, as it was known, was declared heresy at the Council of Nicaea, presided over by Constantine in 325 A.D. Since that time only very small Christian sects (perhaps including Celtic, Grail or Druidic Christian churches) have attempted to officially reconcile Christianity and reincarnation. Believers in Christian reincarnation can, however, point to the Bible itself, especially the book of Matthew and particularly Matthew 17. In it, Jesus identifies John the Baptist as the literal reincarnation of Elijah. In fact, for Old Testament prophecy regarding Jesus to be possible, Elijah would have had to have been present at the time of Christ. The logical problem this poses for Christians that do not believe in reincarnation is obvious.

It can also be argued that the reason that organized Christianity has for the most part refused to entertain the idea of reincarnation is social control. Without a heaven for the righteous only and a hell waiting for all sinners (in the past mortal sin included simply missing Mass) the Church had a good deal less to compel attendance or the need for indulgence. Clearly embracing the idea of reincarnation threatened the social control of the Church. Yet since the logic and essence of Christianity argued for more than just heaven and hell causing, the Roman Catholic Church to retreat a bit from this extreme position and create a third possibility, Purgatory. The idea of Purgatory has never been particularly theologically satisfying, but it retained an element of social control that reincarnation did not, that being that to be eligible for Purgatory and avoid hell altogether one had to die “in a state of grace.” There are no preconditions to reincarnation and hence no instrument for social control. To me it would seem a lot more logical to accept the idea that purgatory and this life are in fact one and the same, giving support to one of the "Noble Truths" of Buddhism, that "life is suffering."

It might also be argued that without the idea of only Heaven and hell, there isn't even a compunction for belief, since if we are likely to reincarnate we don't necessarily need Jesus to save us. That, of course, suggests that we would not want to seek a relationship with Christ if the threat to our souls were not imminent, hardly the basis for the sort of love that I believe that Jesus wants us to have for him.


https://www.amazon.com/Grail-Christianity-R-Roy-Blake-ebook/dp/B01M0MKHJ5/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1478291239&sr=8-1&keywords=on+grail+christianity

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From “On Grail Christianity”


“It would be difficult to go through life without a belief in a loving God. Steve Winwood put it even more strongly in his song Higher Love. “Think about it,” Steve sang, “there must be higher love…without it life is wasted time,” a sentiment with which I agree. I have seen enough of life to believe that life is not wasted time and therefore there must be a Higher Love, a loving God. As a human I am only able to imagine the love God has for us as being akin to the love we have for our children and the love our parents had for us. Two theological truths seem to stem most directly from that belief. One is that the efforts of theological advocates to come up with a perfect theology is a fruitless enterprise because it is impossible for humans to know the mind of God. And as God is also because loving God he would not impose any theological or religious test as a condition of His Love, any more than most parents would disown their children if they adopted a different religion than their parents. Of course, some evil and/or deluded parents do indeed disinherit (or worse in the case of “honor killings”) children that have
adopted different beliefs, at times falsely contending that they do so for the sake of the Lord or their particular deity.


Most theologies tell us that absent divine intervention, at death few if any of us would be absolutely pure of heart and sufficiently sinless to be with God in heaven. Likewise, few of us would be evil enough to deserve hell. Logic would seem to say that if the only two possibilities that are known to exist account for very few cases, a third possibility is very likely. Certainly the idea that the vast majority of humans would be consigned to hell suggests a vengeful and unfeeling God, the kind of God that I, and many others, refuse to believe exists.

In researching the subject I found that the idea of reincarnation and Christianity was never thought completely laughable. Indeed, one of the founders and martyrs of Christianity, Origen of Alexandria, firmly believed in Christianity and reincarnation, although Origenism, as it was known, was declared heresy at the Council of Nicaea, presided over by Constantine in 325 A.D. Since that time only very small Christian sects (perhaps including Celtic, Grail or Druidic Christian churches) have attempted to officially reconcile Christianity and reincarnation. Believers in Christian reincarnation can, however, point to the Bible itself, especially the book of Matthew and particularly Matthew 17. In it, Jesus identifies John the Baptist as the literal reincarnation of Elijah. In fact, for Old Testament prophecy regarding Jesus to be possible, Elijah would have had to have been present at the time of Christ. The logical problem this poses for Christians that do not believe in reincarnation is obvious.

It can also be argued that the reason that organized Christianity has for the most part refused to entertain the idea of reincarnation is social control. Without a heaven for the righteous only and a hell waiting for all sinners (in the past mortal sins included simply missing Mass) the Church had a good deal less to compel attendance or the need for indulgence. Clearly embracing the idea of reincarnation threatened the social control of the Church. Yet since the logic and essence of Christianity argued for more than just heaven and hell causing the Roman Catholic Church to retreat a bit from this extreme position and create a third possibility, Purgatory. The idea of Purgatory has never been particularly theologically satisfying, but it retained an element of social control that reincarnation did not, that being that to be eligible for Purgatory and avoid hell altogether one had to die “in a state of grace.” There are no preconditions to reincarnation and hence no instrument for social control. To me it would seem a lot more logical to accept the idea that purgatory and this life are in fact one and the same, giving support to one of the "Noble Truths" of Buddhism, that "life is suffering."

It might also be argued that without the idea of only Heaven and hell, there isn't even a compunction for belief, since if we are likely to reincarnate, we don't necessarily need Jesus to save us. That, of course, suggests that we would not want to seek a relationship with Christ if the threat to our souls were not imminent, hardly the basis for the sort of love that I believe that Jesus wants us to have for him.

In that sense the idea of original sin is very related to the rejection of reincarnation. Again the idea that at birth we are already condemned by Adam's sin might be seen as another instrument of social control and, certainly not the act of a loving God. A monk of the Celtic Church (aka the Grail Church) who spent a great deal of time in Rome and is otherwise described as "saintly" even by his enemies, especially St. Augustine, Pelagius, argued that Christianity and original sin were incompatible. Likewise Peligianism was declared to be heresy by the Church.”

https://www.amazon.com/Grail-Christianity-R-Roy-Blake-ebook/dp/B01M0MKHJ5/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1476819478&sr=8-1&keywords=on+grail+christianity

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rroyblake@joindiaspora.com less than a minute ago


From "On Grail Christianity"

"Most theologies tell us that absent divine intervention, at death few if any of us would be absolutely pure of heart and sufficiently sinless to be with God in heaven. Likewise, few of us would be evil enough to deserve hell. Logic would seem to say that if the only two possibilities that are known to exist account for very few cases, a third possibility is very likely. Certainly the idea that the vast majority of humans would be consigned to hell suggests a vengeful and unfeeling God, the kind of God that I, and many others, refuse to believe exists.
In researching the subject I found that the idea of reincarnation and Christianity was never thought completely laughable. Indeed, one of the founders and martyrs of Christianity, Origen of Alexandria, firmly believed in Christianity and reincarnation, although Origenism, as it was known, was declared heresy at the Council of Nicaea, presided over by Constantine in 325 A.D. Since that time only very small Christian sects (perhaps including Celtic, Grail or Druidic Christian churches) have attempted to officially reconcile Christianity and reincarnation. Believers in Christian reincarnation can, however, point to the Bible itself, especially the book of Matthew and particularly Matthew 17. In it, Jesus identifies John the Baptist as the literal reincarnation of Elijah. In fact, for Old Testament prophecy regarding Jesus to be possible, Elijah would have had to have been present at the time of Christ. The logical problem this poses for Christians that do not believe in reincarnation is obvious."

https://www.amazon.com/Grail-Christianity-R-Roy-Blake-ebook/dp/B01M0MKHJ5/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1476739523&sr=1-1&keywords=on+grail+christianity

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The oldest Christian denomination, Grail Christianity was said to have been founded by Christ himself during the missing years and restored by Joseph of Arimathea at Glastonbury in the west of England. Grail Christianity differs sharply from later denominations in numerous ways including a belief in reincarnation and rejection of the concept of original sin.
https://www.amazon.com/Grail-Christianity-R-Roy-Blake-ebook/dp/B01M0MKHJ5/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1476481098&sr=8-1&keywords=on+grail+christianity
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