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Alexander Howard
owner

open government  - 
 
New research from the Pew Research Center on online dating: http://www.pewinternet.org/2016/02/11/15-percent-of-american-adults-have-used-online-dating-sites-or-mobile-dating-apps/

Pew Internet found 15% of American adults have used online dating sites or mobile dating apps, up from 12%. Use has tripled since 2013 in people aged 18-24 (think of mobile millennials swiping left or right on Tinder)) and doubled among seniors (Boomers discovered it works.)

One takeaway: stigma of online dating has decreased as mainstream use increased among seniors & mobile millennials. As more American adults have used online dating, positive opinion has grown. 80% of Americans adults who've done it told Pew online dating is a good way to meet people.

You'll see notable differences in attitudes remain between those who have used these websites and apps and those who have not in the figure I've included here.

What HASN'T changed since 2013? ~32% of American adults agree that online dating keeps people from settling down. That's held constant.

Conclusion: Our relationship with digital dating remains complicated, & will remain so. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/dating-apps-vanity-fair-data_us_55ccf3e9e4b064d5910ae171



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Around 63% of Brits are beginning to embrace the idea of internet surveillance carried out by the government; however fear of how personal details will be stored is still at the forefront of people’s minds.

#surveillance #cctv #government #governance #council #marketresearch #mrx  
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Katie Szymanski

collaboration  - 
 
 
Public sector organisations need new ways of working. How does public sector #innovation happen?  http://oe.cd/15m
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Thanks for sharing!
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Alexander Howard
owner

open data  - 
 
How data visualization can save lives:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/this-is-how-visualizing-open-data-can-help-save-lives_56781c17e4b014efe0d5fd59?cje5ewmi

Cities are increasingly releasing data that they can use to make life better for their residents online -- enabling journalists and researchers to better inform the public.

Los Angeles, for example, has analyzed data about injuries and deaths on its streets and published it online. Now people can check its conclusions and understand why LA's public department prioritizes certain intersections.

The impact from these kinds of investments can lead directly to saving lives and preventing injuries. The work is part of a broader effort around the world to make cities safer.
Identifying the location of pedestrian and cyclist injuries is a key first step for cities to reduce the occurrence.
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Alexander Howard
owner

open government  - 
 
The White House Office of Management and Budget has not updated its open government plan since 2010. 19 U.S. open governments have asked President Obama to direct OMB to do so.
http://www.openthegovernment.org/node/5079
WASHINGTON, December 21, 2015 – Today, more than 20 organizations committed to government openness and accountability are calling for the President to take immediate action on the failure of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to comply with Presidential directives on open government.
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Alexander Howard
owner

open government  - 
 
If you're interested in open government, this post is for you.
 
What should +Open Government Partnership do next?

This constructive critique of the Open Government Partnership Steven Adler​ has already been shared here once, but I'll do so again: http://gijn.org/2015/12/12/why-the-open-government-partnership-needs-a-reboot/ because I want to add four specific responses to it and questions for the community.

1) The idea of open government didn't start in the US, with CSPAN televising Congressional hearings to the public. The "idea that government should be open to public scrutiny and susceptible to public opinion dates back at least to the time of the Enlightenment in the 18th century:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_government#History

The technology available to governments and civil society has always been enablers of open government, from the printing press to radio to TV to the Internet and open data:
http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/future_tense/2013/05/open_data_executive_order_is_the_best_thing_obama_s_done_this_month.html

The history of open government has been closely aligned with the global progress of democracy.

2) On that count, I agree with Adler that the Summit in Mexico was a missed opportunity to address many issues that continue to be serious challenges for democratic society in member countries. Do you? http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/mexico-open-government_56324e44e4b0631799115896

3) In that context, Adler's focus on press freedom -- appropriate for the publication his article is within, the Global Investigative Journalism Network -- is spot on. "A free press is a prerequisite for open government." Full stop.
http://www.cjr.org/first_person/open_government_is_meaningless_without_a_free_press.php

4) The problems Adler outlined aren't new. http://techpresident.com/news/wegov/24488/look-open-government-summit-after-peak-open

Are his recommendations for OGP's steering committee and the governments and funders backing the initiative the right approaches to addressing them?
With the second annual Open Government Partnership summit now concluded, one longtime observer of the
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Bruce Moore

Discussion  - 
 
 
Thank you for supporting this worthy cause.
Should there be a law passed which imposes penalties on local elected officials who lie or misrepresent facts in public open meetings?
51 votes  -  votes visible to Public
YES, A LAW WITH STRONG PENALTIES
84%
YES, A LAW WITH WEAK PENALTIES
4%
NO, BUT SHOULD BE PART OF THEIR OATH
6%
NO, IT IS OK TO LIE AND TELL HALF-TRUTHS
6%
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Pressures mount to deliver on DATA Act promises
This article by Wyatt Kash is one of the better rundowns I've seen about the challenges involved in DATA Act implementation. While there have been fundamental mistakes in how implementation is being managed that can be traced to the legislation itself, slow progress is being made. (This is one of the topics I've been researching as part of my "big data project management" research http://www.ddmcd.com/bdpm .)
Federal agencies need to make data 'portable' says Treasury executive, but wrestle best strategies to get there.
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Brian Aull

citizen participation  - 
 
Gender equality
A potent medicine for the ills of the world
The bedrock of a healthy democratic life
http://www.awakendemocracy.com/gender-equality
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Alexander Howard
owner

open government  - 
 
Excellent questions on open government for candidates running for Congress or for President. http://www.openthegovernment.org/node/5116 Odds that any are asked by a moderator in a debate: low. 
The American Society of News Editors (ASNE) and OpenTheGovernment.org have drafted these open government-related questions that can be asked of all candidates for federal office.  Our hope is that they will be used broadly - by editorial boards, reporters covering the 2016 campaigns, and interested members of the public who have an opportunity
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according to the Verizon 2015 Data Breach Investigations Report, the public sector is once again the industry most affected by cyber attacks, with more than 50,000 security incidents in 2014 and more than 300 cases of confirmed data losses.  Join me and the PSTE on February for our panel of government, higher education, and industry discussing "Hacker and the Human Factor"  http://www.publicsectortechnologyexchange.com/Hackers_and_the_Human_Factor_Panel_Bios.html
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Alexander Howard
owner

open government  - 
 
FOIA REFORM IN CONGRESS!

In 3 minutes, I'll be moderating a discussion on Freedom of Information Reform in Congress. Panel: Nate Jones, Director of the Freedom of Information Act Project for the National Security Archive,
Lisette Garcia, founder of the FOIA Resource Center, and Jesse Franzblau, a policy Associate for OpenTheGovernment.org.

Dial in to 641.715.3580 Code: 739-522 and follow along at #FOIAintel on Twitter.

Context for our discussion here: http://e-pluribusunum.org/2016/01/11/new-freedom-of-information-act-reform-bill-introduced-in-congress/#update
On Tuesday, the U.S. House of Representatives will once again weigh reforming the Freedom of Information Act to improve how the most important open government law of the United States is honored. T...
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Alexander Howard
owner

open government  - 
 
There was context missing from coverage of proposed FOIA reforms in Congress. So, I wrote this up:
http://e-pluribusunum.org/2016/01/11/new-freedom-of-information-act-reform-bill-introduced-in-congress/

On Tuesday, the U.S. House of Representatives will once again weigh reforming the Freedom of Information Act to improve how the most important open government law of the United States is honored.
On Tuesday, the U.S. House of Representatives will once again weigh reforming the Freedom of Information Act to improve how the most important open government law of the United States is honored. T...
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Graeme Jones

open government  - 
 
Not long now until the Freedom of Information Act on 1st February 2016 in the Isle of Man (UK), even though we already have the longest continuous parliament in the world (Norwegian) lol.

Sustained efforts in recent years have meant a top 100, then top 50 and now top 20 ranking in the open government league table:
http://index.okfn.org/place/

But parliamentary Q&A will likely remain a key source of reactive information, an open data home page (http://data.gov.im) will become the key source of proactive information and, on one day per year, the distinctly analogue petitions to Tynwald Hill (http://www.tynwald.org.im/about/tynday/Pages/default.aspx) will perhaps continue to prompt select committees to ask why there is no information.

Happy new year!

Graeme Jones

project lead
openmindedly
open data | open government | open banking
www.openmindedly.com

co-founder
banknotey
egovernment with cash customers
www.banknotey.com

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Banknotey and uncontract seem interesting. More info?
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Alexander Howard
owner

civic technology  - 
 
NEW from me: A look at the City of Albuquerque and digital government:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/albuquerque-mayor-richard-berry_5679a299e4b0b958f658429e

"We've gone just beyond doing data dumps," Mayor Richard Berry told me. "We were a real leader earlier in this movement, and the reason we were a leader is not because I walked up as a mayor but because I've got smart people who work with the city. They were just looking for somebody to cut them loose and do this work. All of the kudos go to our staff and IT people. They're being nationally recognized now, so I've had a lot of fun watching them blossom, taking their expertise and putting it to good work for the citizens. It's not just data dumps; we're trying to put it into a dashboard format. "
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Alexander Howard
owner

open government  - 
 
A new law review paper on the Freedom of Information Act requests to 6 federal agencies in the USA confirms role of commercial entities in case load and volume: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2685402

Here's a quick playbook on how open data can support FOIA and be directly tied supporting the accountability a free press provides in democracies:

Step 1: Enact strong Freedom of Information Laws and Open Data Policies that create a presumption of openness.

Step 2: Track FOIA requests that do not have an media or public interest exemption

Step 3: Prioritize open data releases according to which public records are repeatedly requested by commercial entities. There should be a monetary payment each time. Agencies can just follow the money to find "high value datasets."
e-pluribusunum.org/2013/09/28/hedge-fund-use-of-government-data-for-business-intelligence-shows-where-the-value-is/

Step 4: Invest the money and personnel time saved from releasing these records in answering FOIA requests from journalists and the public.


Dispatches on open government and technology by Alexander B. Howard
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Alexander Howard
owner

open government  - 
 
What should +Open Government Partnership do next?

This constructive critique of the Open Government Partnership Steven Adler​ has already been shared here once, but I'll do so again: http://gijn.org/2015/12/12/why-the-open-government-partnership-needs-a-reboot/ because I want to add four specific responses to it and questions for the community.

1) The idea of open government didn't start in the US, with CSPAN televising Congressional hearings to the public. The "idea that government should be open to public scrutiny and susceptible to public opinion dates back at least to the time of the Enlightenment in the 18th century:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_government#History

The technology available to governments and civil society has always been enablers of open government, from the printing press to radio to TV to the Internet and open data:
http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/future_tense/2013/05/open_data_executive_order_is_the_best_thing_obama_s_done_this_month.html

The history of open government has been closely aligned with the global progress of democracy.

2) On that count, I agree with Adler that the Summit in Mexico was a missed opportunity to address many issues that continue to be serious challenges for democratic society in member countries. Do you? http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/mexico-open-government_56324e44e4b0631799115896

3) In that context, Adler's focus on press freedom -- appropriate for the publication his article is within, the Global Investigative Journalism Network -- is spot on. "A free press is a prerequisite for open government." Full stop.
http://www.cjr.org/first_person/open_government_is_meaningless_without_a_free_press.php

4) The problems Adler outlined aren't new. http://techpresident.com/news/wegov/24488/look-open-government-summit-after-peak-open

Are his recommendations for OGP's steering committee and the governments and funders backing the initiative the right approaches to addressing them?
With the second annual Open Government Partnership summit now concluded, one longtime observer of the
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Alexander Howard
owner

open government  - 
 
An open source platform to make reading regulations easier. Sounds like a good idea!

Let's see if the public becomes more informed -- and other governments adopt it.

Here's how more on how it was built: https://18f.gsa.gov/2015/12/09/an-open-source-government-is-a-faster-more-efficient-government/ and the first example: https://atf-eregs.18f.gov/479

SUBPART A - Scope of Regulations. § 479.1 General. SUBPART B - Definitions. § 479.11 Meaning of terms. SUBPART C - Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions. § 479.21 Forms prescribed. § 479.22 Right of entry and examination. § 479.23 Restrictive use of required information.
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Alexander Howard
owner

civic technology  - 
 
[NEW] The U.S. Department of Transportation​ & Vulcan Inc.​ have launched a fifty million dollar Smart Cities Challenge http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/smart-cities-challenge-transportation-prize_56660184e4b08e945ff09aaf First step: define smart city!

In the coming months, big tech companies will talk up top-down approaches to smart cities, while civic technologists will focus on bottom-up approaches. In between, city governments will need to explain why spending $50 million dollars on these ideas will make a real difference to residents, particularly in the context of $200 million dollar boondoggles like D.C.'s trolley project.

The collective challenge will be to ensure that the smart cities empower residents, as opposed to locking them in the "invisible barbed wire" of a surveillance society. In the past, mass surveillance has been bad for the urban poor. This Smart Cities Challenge is a golden opportunity for mayors to talk about what installing "smart" objects will mean to their communities, from parking meters and street lights to buses and garages.

In the 21st century, the consent of the governed won't just mean "no taxation without representation." It will increasingly mean "no data collection without consent." City governments need to ensure that residents have an opportunity to know what's being proposed and installed in their name. Once sensors are installed and start collecting data, the conversation will shift to how data will be used and by whom, rather than whether the data should be used at all. 
A new contest offers $50 million to the city with the best plan.
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Alexander Howard
owner

civic technology  - 
 
Winners of the latest version of New York City's BigApps Challenge, announced Thursday, show how tough lessons from the first generation of city apps contests are now helping to creating civic value and community. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/new-york-city-bigapps-winners_5661f1a6e4b079b2818e94f5?xekx1or

New York's experience will help demonstrate to mayors around the world how to get the most social impact and economic value from government data: Start with the civic problem you want to target, then find the data, partners and community to make the changes you want to see in the world.
The lesson for cities struggling to harness the power of data: Start with the problem.
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