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This is a wild story about one or more researchers who created phony identities, which were then called upon by an editor to review papers from the same researchers.  
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Lisandro Dalcin's profile photoChristopher Rinderspacher's profile photo
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One of the reasons I came to KAUST was the prospect of getting to help shape an institution in ways like this.
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Disruption Disrupted?
The professor who books his flights online, reserves lodging with Airbnb, and arranges airport transportation with Uber understands the disruption of the travel industry. He actively supports that disruption every time he attends a conference. When MOOCs th...
The professor who books his flights online, reserves lodging with Airbnb, and arranges airport transportation with Uber understands the disruption of the travel industry. He actively supports that disruption every time he att...
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Lisa Pautler's profile photoMarius Buliga's profile photo
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Videos from the recent "Disruption in Publishing" meeting (featuring +corydoctorow, +Mark Hahnel, Jan Velterop, and +OKFN's
Michelle Brook) are now available online

h/t +Graham Steel 
The talks from the Edinburgh Publishing Conference 2014: Cory Doctorow, Rachel Willmer, Ian Ritchie, Brennan Dunn, Peter Armstrong, and more...
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Graham Steel's profile photoWilliam Gunn's profile photoMarius Buliga's profile photoRoss Mounce's profile photo
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Yeah, the sound cuts off a few times in some of the talks. I had to use wi-fi since we didn't have a secure internet connection.
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For some reason, someone has taken one article from the Journal of Interactive Marketing, combined it with an author set from a different article published 10 years later, and created a fake J Interactive Marketing article complete with doi that points to the second article. Copies of this counterfeit article can be seen on Farsi language Web sites.  
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While not publishing per se, the NIH grant process is similar enough to the publication process that I hope this will be of some interest to this group
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Stacy Konkiel

Discussion  - 
 
+PeerJ is now issuing DOIs for peer-reviews to help with potential future linkrot and give reviewers a chance to get credit for the contributions.
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Flavio Pendolino's profile photoMarius Buliga's profile photo
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One item You have one item to sell and you need to post a price for it. There is a single potential buyer and the value of the item for the buyer is distributed according to a known probability dis...
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Kent Anderson's SocialCite aims to make #citations meaningful via crowd-sourced sentiment analysis, but he claims [1] it's not #altmetrics. Thoughts?

[1] http://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org/2014/05/01/altmetrics-mistaking-the-means-for-the-end/#comment-138555
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Matt Hodgkinson's profile photoJill O'Neill's profile photo
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SocialCite or similar tools can add machine-extractable meaning to citations beyond counting numbers - that could be used to refine article-level or journal-level citation metrics, but isn't altmetrics per se afaics
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Disruption in the Publishing Industry: Digital, Analytics & the Future - June 20th, Edinburgh.
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About this community

This is a closed-invite public group for the academic publishing community. I thought I would start it, invite some folks I know, let them invite folks they know, and just grow from there. At some point we should probably take off the approval requirement. If you'd like to help moderate, just let me know, I certainly don't presume to represent the academic publishing community all on my own! This is to be a respectful place for all views, so whatever side of the industry you're on and and wherever you stand on open access or other issues, I ask that you please refrain from being jerks to one another and I hope it's not necessary to be more specific than that.
 
Taylor & Francis have published their Open Access survey for 2014.
My reading is that there has been a noticeable improvement in people's attitudes towards open access over the last year.
http://www.tandfonline.com/page/openaccess/opensurvey/2014
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Lisa Pautler's profile photo
 
Attitudes, definitely - a very good sign. But it seems that in practice the variety of OA flavors, requirements, and associated mandates are still confusing.  

T&F is encouraging discussion & comments on Twitter via  #oasurvey2014 , if you want to see what some others have said so far (https://twitter.com/search?q=%23oasurvey2014&src=typd)
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This morning ees.elsevier.com is down, a bit before 9am in North America, precluding editors, reviewers or submitters from, well, editing, reviewing or submitting.  I shall now remind Elsevier in this forum that with the advent of the "World Wide Web", that, unlike with paper, your Web site is like live TV. You can't let it go down. 
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Gender bias and double-blind reviews?

I happened upon this article (http://methodsblog.wordpress.com/2014/06/25/gender-bias/#more-3497) which suggests that journals with double-blind reviewing may help gender equality, and offers some (admittedly not very rigorous) data to support the idea.  Nonetheless I can see the logic of the argument.

My question: Has there been any serious work on this?  And if anyone has any good sources, could they share them?
By Pat Backwell Associate Editor, Methods in Ecology and Evolution There is a lot of discussion about gender differences in the publication of scientific papers. A clear pattern is that men produce...
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Jason Moore's profile photo
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The Billionaires, Part 1: Elon Musk
Elon Musk did not need a journal to publicize his Hyperloop paper.  [Hyperloop Alpha]   No journal can create the kind of buzz he creates on his own. He did not need the validation of peer review; he had the credibility of his research teams that already re...
Elon Musk did not need a journal to publicize his Hyperloop paper. [Hyperloop Alpha] No journal can create the kind of buzz he creates on his own. He did not need the validation of peer review; he had the credibility of his r...
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Richard Poynder's profile photo
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+Ryan Anderson interviews +Jason Baird Jackson for the latest issue of Cultural Anthropology. This might be a nice piece to pass on to those interested in learning a bit more about the basics of Open Access terminology and practice, such as the distinction between Gold OA and Green OA.
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+Arfon Smith & collaborators prototype a #peerreview  layer that leverages ArXiv.org and +GitHub to create the (fake) Open Journal of Astrophysics. 
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Adeel Khan Yusufzai's profile photoDavid Roberts's profile photo
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Dennis D. McDonald
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
 
“I think we are in the golden age of science communication, with an awful lot of scientists adapting and projecting their science extremely effectively now,” says best-selling author and passionate science advocate, Bill Bryson. http://bit.ly/1hwOYIS #scicomm
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Dennis D. McDonald
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
Yes I have to agree there is more to publishing than pushing a button ...
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Peter Binfield
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
"A survey of authors publishing in four megajournals" by David Solomon https://peerj.com/articles/365/
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Peter Binfield's profile photoDom Mitchell's profile photo
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#academiaPublishing #wikipedia
@LSEImpactBlog Creating an efficient workflow for publishing scholarly papers on Wikipedia. Today's post by @mlpoulter http://bit.ly/1kCB5NH 
The global scope and popularity of Wikipedia make it an ideal medium for researchers to share expertise. But it has been difficult to find an efficient way to link accessible scholarly work into th...
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Filippo Salustri's profile photoMonica Xiao's profile photoAndrea Huang's profile photo
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You are absolutely right about the worry of accountability. That’s why we need more researchers’ efforts on this issue. In the meantime, I am more optimistic about that academic articles in wekipedia will become data-centric objects that data model like W3C’s PROV-O can support  to represent and reason the Provenance Information.  (for a possible development, you may like to see a model we have proposed: http://andrea-index.blogspot.com/2013/12/R4R.html).
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