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Results of research supported by public and public-private funds are set to be made freely available
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... Just make sure you spell my name right
We spoke with a few of them, and for the most part, they had no problem with being popular on the piracy network.
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The Editor of the Journal of Management apologizes for the 2 1/2 year lag between the acceptance of an article and when it makes it into print. The sponsoring organization can't get Sage to pony up extra pages. It's a tough world out there for academic organizations.
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Legal professionals, information multipliers, publishers, reusers, data journalists, academics ... this event is being organised especially for you! ...

The Publications Office of the European Union is holding a conference on access to and reuse of EU legal information on 21 March 2016.

In the spotlight will be the access and reuse services provided by the Publications Office, in particular the wide range of options offered by EUR-Lex – the gateway to law and legal information from the EU.

More info, agenda and registration details 1 click away: http://bit.ly/1P31ndF
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In this article the author tries to understand why the Internet has not killed off any of the big academic publishers. If anything, those publishers are profiting like never before. 
As a young professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the 1940s and 1950s, Paul Samuelson made a habit of visiting the offices of the Quarterly Journal of Economics, then based at MIT, to look through the other economics journals that arrived in the mail. "I'd read every journal, every article," he told me a decade ago.
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The author of this piece answers the question posed in her title with a figure of $380 per article, not including marketing. 
Nonprofit publishers describe what they pay to create "free" academic journals.
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#ProQuestGate and #EEBOgate - why is there no open access to early English books? How did a for-profit end up in charge of a piece of humanity's cultural heritage? 
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(Not the entire collection.) 
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It will be interesting to see where Google Scholar ends up within the Alphabet reorg. Will it simply be part of the search business? Or will it be spun off as a separate entity? 
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Henrikke Baumann's profile photoDavid Roberts's profile photoHelger Lipmaa's profile photoJukka Suomela's profile photo
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Ah, get it.
Agree. It would be terrible to lose scholar. It doesn't even have a page here on g+.
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Elsevier is suing sci-hub and libgen for irreparable harm. 
The academic publisher Elsevier last week filed a complaint against two web sites who it accuses of pirating its academic articles and other publications and offering them up to the world for free.
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Arin Basu

Discussion  - 
 
Last Thursday, we organised a meeting on open access at the University of Canterbury, where we had Peter Lund, the research resource person of the University of Canterbury, Anton Angelo (Creative Commons), Peter Binfield (PeerJ), and Virginia Barbour (Australian Open Access) spoke. Here is the link to the video. Enjoy!
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About this community

This is a closed-invite public group for the academic publishing community. I thought I would start it, invite some folks I know, let them invite folks they know, and just grow from there. At some point we should probably take off the approval requirement. If you'd like to help moderate, just let me know, I certainly don't presume to represent the academic publishing community all on my own! This is to be a respectful place for all views, so whatever side of the industry you're on and and wherever you stand on open access or other issues, I ask that you please refrain from being jerks to one another and I hope it's not necessary to be more specific than that.
 
As of about 24 hours ago, SSRN ceased to exist as an independent entity. 
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The writer refers to the site as the Pirate Bay of Science. Thanks and a tip of the hat to +Jamie Murphy for the article. 
A researcher in Russia has made more than 48 million journal articles - almost every single peer-reviewed paper every published - freely available online. And she's now refusing to shut the site down , despite a court injunction and a lawsuit from...
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Ten management journal editors have jointly decided to introduce a "registered report" publication path.
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From this blog entry by John Hawks I learned that there is a statistical relationship - a positive relationship - between the Impact Factor of a journal and the percentage of retracted articles in the journal.
New scientific publication models have introduced more open peer review models, but it remains hard to quantify the value of the review process.
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"... in the light of ever more devious ruses of editors, the JIF indicator has now lost most of its credibility."
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Opening shot in a revolution, or meaningless gesture?
All the editors and their entire editorial board resign after Elsevier refuses to make ‘Lingua’ fully open access and transfer ownership of the 66-year-old journal to them.
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The most important rule - don't thank people. Thanks +Spencer Ross. Wait, I meant thanks for the link. Of course he didn't give me a paper from his uni library. 
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I post this story on Reed Elsevier's Reed Business Information subsidiary without comment. 
The London office of Reed Business Information sold critical data that helped sanctioned banks funding chemical and nuclear weapons in Syria and Iran make complex international transactions. A Buzz...
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According to the petitioners the policy imposes “unacceptably long embargo periods of up to 48 months” for some journals
But publisher says changes to policy are ‘evidence-based’ and adhere to standard principles on sharing work
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