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According to the petitioners the policy imposes “unacceptably long embargo periods of up to 48 months” for some journals
But publisher says changes to policy are ‘evidence-based’ and adhere to standard principles on sharing work
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The editor basically defended publishing the paper by saying that the results will now show the world that it is unwise to do, and publish, this kind of thing. Ah OK then.  
The science world was rocked last week by news that geneticists in China had modified the DNA of human embryos. In the face of mounting criticism, science journal Protein & Cell has issued a formal response explaining why it chose to publish the controversial study.
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Michael Rowe

Discussion  - 
 
"Perma.cc is a service, currently in beta, that allows users to create citation links that will never break. When a user creates a Perma.cc link, Perma.cc archives a copy of the referenced content, and generates a link to an unalterable hosted instance of the site. Regardless of what may happen to the original source, if the link is later published by a journal using the Perma.cc service, the archived version will always be available through the Perma.cc link."

This sounds great, being able to archive links to sites that go away. But what happens if Perma.cc goes away?
Broken links are everywhere. Perma helps authors and journals create permanent links for citations in their published work.
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Michael Rowe

Discussion  - 
 
"Writing is not an add-on to the “real” academic work of research and teaching. It is the work."
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Some of the results presented in this are relevant to academic publishing I believe.  This is a technical demonstration of the way that copyright law reduces distribution and access in the used book market.  
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Dom Mitchell

Discussion  - 
 
New issue of Information Services and Use, for #library #informationscience #openaccess #elpub2014 #ape2014
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Ben Mudrak

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Hi everyone! I'm on the planning committee for the next Annual Meeting of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (May 27-29, 2015 in Arlington, VA), and we're looking for proposals to organize sessions for the meeting. This year's focus is connecting the diverse perspectives in scholarly publishing. If you have an idea for a session (it doesn't just have to be a panel of speakers; other formats are welcome), please send it in. Proposals are due this Wednesday, November 19th. 
This is your chance to shape the SSP program as a speaker or session organizer. The Call for Participation is open now through November 19, and we want to hear from you with a proposal for a session you would like to attend, organize, or lead.
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Acharya et al. (2014), "The Rise of the Rest: The Growing Impact of Non-Elite Journals" - from the Google Scholar team.  
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Grist for the Academic Publishing Community mill...   
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Brian Cody

Discussion  - 
 
UC Press is launching a new OA multi-discipline mega-journal.
Image: Neil Christensen Neil Christensen is the director of digital development at the University of California Press (UCP). Prior to working at UCP, Christensen worked in business development and as...
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About this community

This is a closed-invite public group for the academic publishing community. I thought I would start it, invite some folks I know, let them invite folks they know, and just grow from there. At some point we should probably take off the approval requirement. If you'd like to help moderate, just let me know, I certainly don't presume to represent the academic publishing community all on my own! This is to be a respectful place for all views, so whatever side of the industry you're on and and wherever you stand on open access or other issues, I ask that you please refrain from being jerks to one another and I hope it's not necessary to be more specific than that.
 
OK, OK, you can put me on the paper as 1,001st author
Genomics paper with an unusually high number of authors sets researchers buzzing on social media.
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"“The biggest problem was merging the author lists from two collaborations with their own slightly different styles".
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Got lots of grant money? Pay to go to the head of the reviewing line.
150 editors at Nature Publishing Group’s Scientific Reports to resign if the option to jump the publication queue becomes permanent
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Jill O'Neill

Discussion  - 
 
Worthwhile Reading:  Should I Stay or Should I Go? Alternative Infrastructures in Scholarly Publishing? Lead author is Carl Legoze, Univ Michigan
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Peer review and the creation of knowledge. 
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Michael Rowe

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Since this article deals with textbooks, it is slightly off topic for this community. On the other hand, the author makes a dry series of legal maneuvers come alive.
Supap Kirtsaeng is a rebel without a pause, as the copyright fight isn't over yet.
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This looks like an interesting model: you send in your paper before you have collected or looked at the data. The paper is accepted (or not). You get your data, write up your results and someone checks to make sure you did what you said you were going to do. 
July 2014 , Oxford. Challenging traditions in research reporting: New journal Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology. Taylor & Francis, the European Association of Social Psychology and the Society of Australasian Social Psychologists, are launching an innovative new social psychology ...
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Yes, the Center for Open Science has been advocating for this system, called Registered Reports. We're using it for the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology and have worked with +Mark Patterson at eLife to use it for our publications. It's particularly suited to a replication study, because you really want to constrain the analytical degrees of freedom there, but it could also be useful for less exploratory primary research. 
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David Roberts

Discussion  - 
 
 
This paper comes with accompanying blog post:

http://googlescholar.blogspot.com.au/2014/10/rise-of-rest-growing-impact-of-non.html

http://arxiv.org/abs/1410.2217 

Title: Rise of the Rest: The Growing Impact of Non-Elite Journals
Authors: Anurag Acharya, Alex Verstak, Helder Suzuki, Sean Henderson, Mikhail Iakhiaev, Cliff Chiung Yu Lin, Namit Shetty

Abstract: In this paper, we examine the evolution of the impact of non-elite journals. We attempt to answer two questions. First, what fraction of the top-cited articles are published in non-elite journals and how has this changed over time. Second, what fraction of the total citations are to non-elite journals and how has this changed over time. 
We studied citations to articles published in 1995-2013. We computed the 10 most-cited journals and the 1000 most-cited articles each year for all 261 subject categories in Scholar Metrics. We marked the 10 most-cited journals in a category as the elite journals for the category and the rest as non-elite. 
There are two conclusions from our study. First, the fraction of top-cited articles published in non-elite journals increased steadily over 1995-2013. While the elite journals still publish a substantial fraction of high-impact articles, many more authors of well-regarded papers in diverse research fields are choosing other venues. 
The number of top-1000 papers published in non-elite journals for the representative subject category went from 149 in 1995 to 245 in 2013, a growth of 64%. Looking at broad research areas, 4 out of 9 areas saw at least one-third of the top-cited articles published in non-elite journals in 2013. For 6 out of 9 areas, the fraction of top-cited papers published in non-elite journals for the representative subject category grew by 45% or more. 
Second, now that finding and reading relevant articles in non-elite journals is about as easy as finding and reading articles in elite journals, researchers are increasingly building on and citing work published everywhere. Considering citations to all articles, the percentage of citations to articles in non-elite journals went from 27% in 1995 to 47% in 2013. Six out of nine broad areas had at least 50% of citations going to articles published in non-elite journals in 2013.

#arXiv   #publishing  
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