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United States of America US Capped Bust Half Dollar 1826 silver coin VF

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Hi everyone. just wanted to post a few of my oldest coins I have. I've been a member if this community for a while now and I have to say I caught the "collecting bug" everyone here has. šŸ˜ I find myself looking at every coin I touch. I don't know much and am still learning from everyone here and having fun too. Thank you guys for the great posts and the knowledge behind them.
Those pennies had a nice color to them that's what caught my eye. :)
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8/6/17
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Hey fellows... Just.. To see if you guys ..think this worth keeping..you opinion...!?
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My 1904-O Morgan Silver dollar MS65! History behind the coin, The Morgan dollar was a United States dollar coinminted from 1878 to 1904, and again in 1921. It was the first standard silver dollar minted since production of the previous design, the Seated Liberty dollar, ceased due to the passage of the Coinage Act of 1873, which also ended the free coining of silver. The coin is named after its designer, United States Mint Assistant Engraver George T. Morgan. The obverse depicts a profile portrait representing Liberty, while the reverse depicts an eagle with wings outstretched.The dollar was authorized by the Blandā€“Allison Act. Following the passage of the 1873 act, mining interests lobbied to restore free silver, which would require the Mint to accept all silver presented to it and return it, struck into coin. Instead, the Blandā€“Allison Act was passed, which required the Treasury to purchase between two and four million dollars' worth of silver at market value to be coined into dollars each month. In 1890, the Blandā€“Allison Act was repealed by the Sherman Silver Purchase Act, which required the Treasury to purchase 4,500,000 troy ounces (140,000 kg) of silver each month, but only required further silver dollar production for one year. This act, once again, was repealed in 1893.

In 1898, Congress approved a bill that required all remaining bullion purchased under the Sherman Silver Purchase Act to be coined into silver dollars. When those silver reserves were depleted in 1904, the Mint ceased to strike the Morgan dollar. The Pittman Act, passed in 1918, authorized the melting and recoining of millions of silver dollars. Pursuant to the act, Morgan dollars resumed mintage for one year in 1921. The design was replaced by the Peace dollar later the same year.

In the early 1960s, a large quantity of unissued Morgan dollars was discovered in the Treasury vaults, including issues once thought rare. Individuals began purchasing large quantities of the pieces at face value, and eventually the Treasury ceased exchanging silver certificates for silver coin. Beginning in the 1970s, the Treasury conducted a sale of silver dollars minted at the Carson City Mintthrough the General Services Administration. In 2006, Morgan's reverse design was used on a silver dollar issued to commemorate the old San Francisco Mintbuilding.
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8/14/17
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This goes out to the Marines, and it's veterans. Semper Fidelis
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8/14/17
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Check these out my wife's nephews collection
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8/7/17
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An old large cent piece dated 1848!
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8/9/16
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