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Come to Fukuoka.....Lock in Dates Now
Following the recent successful 'Building the Innovation Century' event in Melbourne we (AISP) have agreed to be involved in the next Asia Pacific event of ISPIM to be held in Fukuoka, Japan 2-5 December 2018. See https://www.ispim-connects-fukuoka.com/ - ISPIM CONNECTS FUKUOKA and as one of the opportunities we are going to engage with the local industry in Japan and offer a Seafood Tour. More about this as we move forward.

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More than 20,000 tonnes of plastic waste are dumped in landfill sites in Australia each year yet we continue to use plastic because it’s essential to our daily lives. With this in mind, Angelina invented not one, but six bioplastics to see which would make the most commercially viable plastic. One of the bioplastics that Angelina developed decomposes 300 times faster than conventional plastic.
https://vimeo.com/200738218

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Seafood traceability for fisheries compliance
http://www.fao.org/3/a-i8183e.pdf
Big congratulations to our friend Francisco Blaha!! Francisco is an expert on many things fisheries especially traceability and has worked with FAO and colleagues to deliver Hosch, G. & Blaha, F. 2017. Seafood traceability for fisheries compliance – Country level support for catch documentation schemes. FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Technical Paper No. 619. Rome, Italy.
This document explores ways in which individual countries in seafood supply chains can, in their capacities as coastal, flag, port, processing or end-market states, contribute to maximizing the effectiveness of catch documentation schemes.
The focus is on the traceability of seafood consignments, but the authors also explore other important compliance mechanisms that lie beyond traceability and that support the effective implementation of catch documentation schemes at the country level.
The document explains which traceability mechanisms are built into catch documentation schemes, and which additional support mechanisms must be provided by individual countries along seafood supply chains.
The study finds that traditional fisheries monitoring, inspection and sanctioning mechanisms are of primary importance with regard to flag, coastal and end-market states, whereas effective country-level traceability mechanisms are of particular importance in port and processing states.
The text is segmented into three parts:
The first part – Chapters 1 to 3 – introduces the study and the methodology used, and describes the functioning of catch documentation schemes.
The second part – Chapter 4 – provides findings with regard to country-level support mechanisms for catch documentation schemes for each state type participating in seafood supply chains.
The third part – Chapter 5 – provides conclusions, recommendations and policy guidance on the basis of the findings in the second part.
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