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From the Higgs boson to the big bang (and everything in between) -- listen to Perimeter Director Neil Turok's chat with Mary Ito on CBC Radio Fresh Air.

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LHC and Tevatron scientists announced their first joint result - the world's best value for the mass of the top quark - at the Rencontres de Moriond international physics conference today: http://home.web.cern.ch/about/updates/2014/03/lhc-and-tevatron-scientists-announce-first-joint-result

This graphic shows the four individual top quark mass measurements published by the ATLAS, CDF, CMS and DZero collaborations, together with the most precise measurement obtained in a joint analysis.

For more information about physics opportunities and more at CERN, visit http://jobs.web.cern.ch/.
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Now just need a sixth boson
The Standard Model of particle physics: a beautiful but flawed theory. Supersymmetry could be the solution http://www.quantumdiaries.org/2014/03/14/the-standard-model-a-beautiful-but-flawed-theory/

Now that a Higgs boson has been discovered, many hope the next LHC discovery could be new particles associated with a theory called supersymmetry. Here's the 1st of 3 supersymmetry blogs, about the flaws of the Standard Model (pictured here) and why we'd need a new theory to go beyond it.

Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
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a new blog for dissemination of current theoretical physics

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Forget solid, liquid, and gas: there are in fact more than 500 phases of matter. In a major paper in a recent issue of Science, Perimeter Faculty member Xiao-Gang Wen reveals a modern reclassification of all of them.

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IBM manufactures light-based 'nanophotonic' chips to let the terabytes flow. IBM's taken a large step toward computer chips that use photons instead of electrons by manufacturing the first 90nm silicon-based optical processing modules. It did so using the CMOS nanophotonics technology creating tranceivers capable of 25Gbps transfer speeds. By multiplexing a large number of those streams to a single fibre, "terrabytes of data" per second could flow between distant computer systems," according to IBM. The 90 nanometer light circuits should allow data-hungry servers or supercomputers to scale up rapidly in speed "for the next decade, and at the desired low cost," according to the researchers. It's now primed for commercial development, meaning we could see an end to bottlenecks in systems "a few centimeters or a few kilometers" apart from each other.

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Girl, 7, cured of leukaemia after scientists 'reprogramme' immune cells to destroy the cancer. New therapy creates 'guided missile' T-cells by attaching antibodies to them. Nine of 12 patients in the study, including two children, responded to treatment.
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