Response to Readings for 2/19
In preparation, please read the suggested readings (see post below), and share with your group about:
* What did you find most interesting or surprising in the readings?
* What did you disagree with or have questions about?
Please keep your postings short (just two or three paragraphs).

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I can't really think of a specific object of my childhood, but vividly remember that my childhood was "dangerous". Or at least what many 'modern' parents would consider dangerous.A number of years ago I read an article about why you should your kids play with fire. A brief search yields a link to a review of  Gever Tulley and Julie Spiegler's "Fifty Dangerous Things (You Should Let Your Children Do)". The short list includes pounding nails and breaking glass. Read more about tinkering and developing a healthy sense of curiosity: http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2011/05/let-kids-play-with-fire-and-other-rules-for-good-parenting/238601/

Growing up in the rural sixties of NH we spent a lot of time outside. We lived next to a lumber yard and when operations ceased at 4:00 PM and the workers left we promptly arrived on our bikes. Nothing was locked -- not the office, not the sawing and milling buildings. We used the phones, we turned machines on and off just to hear the whirring sounds. We started trucks because the keys were always left in the ignition. And then -- we left everything as we had found it.

Beyond the lumber yard lay the woods. We walked far, following a winding brook for what seemed like a great distance to small children. We were gone for hours. When dinner time approached someone's mother would head outside and call for us on the "neighborhood telephone": a good loud yell. After dinner we were back outside playing and discovering until the bats came out. We knew it was time to come in when it was still light enough to see, but dark was just around the corner.

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Additional optional activity to which we can all respond:
Marshmallow discussion

Here is one activity to which you can reply:

Syllabus Activity:
Read Seymour Papert’s essay on the “Gears of My Childhood” and write about an object from your childhood that interested and influenced you (and share with your group). For inspiration, you can find more childhood-object stories in Additional Resources (below).

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Session - 1 Video 

What This Week Hold For us:

February 19, 2013: Interest-Based Learning (Session 2)
Panelists: Joi Ito, Mimi Ito
Readings and Reflection:
* Seymour Papert (1980): Mindstorms: Children, Computers, and Powerful Ideas (Foreword: The Gears of My Childhood)
* Joi Ito blog posts: Formal vs Informal Education, Reading the Dictionary, Dubai and Learning about the Unknowable
* Joi Ito (2012). Keynote to Open Educational Resources meeting (video), Hewlett Foundation.
* Mimi Ito et al. (2009): Learning and Living with New Media. MacArthur Foundation.
In preparation, please read the suggested readings (above), and share with your group about:
* What did you find most interesting or surprising in the readings?
* What did you disagree with or have questions about?
Please keep your postings short (just two or three paragraphs).
Activity:
Read Seymour Papert’s essay on the “Gears of My Childhood” and write about an object from your childhood that interested and influenced you (and share with your group). For inspiration, you can find more childhood-object stories in Additional Resources (below).
Also, we encourage you to try out the Marshmallow Challenge, as described in the video [link to come], and discuss your experiences with others in your group. Afterwards, watch the TED talk about the Marshmallow Challenge, to learn about the experiences of others, from kindergarteners to business-school students. (Note that we decided to organize the challenge slightly differently than the one in the TED talk. What do you see as the advantages of each approach?)
Additional Resources:
* Mimi Ito et al. (2013). Connected Learning: An Agenda for Research and Design, MacArthur Foundation.
* MacArthur Foundation (2012): The Essence of Connected Learning (video).
* Wired Magazine (2012). Open university: Joi Ito plans a radical reinvention of MIT's Media Lab.
* Sherry Turkle (2007). Evocative Objects: Things We Think With (Introduction, and selected essays - Cello, Knots, Stars). MIT Press.
* Sherry Turkle (2008). Falling for science: Objects in Mind (Blocks, Steps, Venus Paradis Coloring Set). MIT Press.
* Sayamindu Dasgupta (2010). Kites; Ricarose Roque (2010). Pencils
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