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Indorf Donald

2016 - Share your skills sessions  - 
 


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'Hearthstone Heroes @[113763815361227:274:World of Warcraft]
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.blizzard.wtcg.hearthstone

Device:Android

Carriers:All

info
DECEPTIVELY SIMPLE. INSANELY FUN.
Pick up your cards and throw down the gauntlet! In Hearthstone, you play the hero in a fast-paced, whimsical card game of cunning strategy. In minutes, you’ll be unleashing powerful cards to sling spells, summon minions, and seize control of an ever-shifting battlefield. Whether it’s your first card game or you’re an experienced pro, the depth and charm of Hearthstone will draw you in.

JUMP RIGHT IN: Fun introductory missions bring you into the world of Hearthstone’s intuitive gameplay.

BUILD YOUR DECK: With hundreds of additional cards to win and craft - your collection grows with you.
HONE YOUR SKILLS: Play in practice matches against computer-controlled heroes of the Warcraft universe. Thrall, Uther, Gul’dan - they’re all here!

COLLECTION TRAVELS WITH YOU: Your card collection is linked to your Battle.net account - enabling you to switch your play between tablet and desktop with ease.

AND FIGHT FOR GLORY: When you’re ready, step into the Arena and duel other players for the chance to win awesome prizes!'Ảnh của Game mobile.
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Game mobile
27 Tháng 6 2015 ·
Hearthstone Heroes World of Warcraft
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details
Device:Android
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Niall O'Connor

2016 - final body of work  - 
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Liam Steeples

2016 - A dialogue with a stranger  - 
 
Task 4

Sorry this is late but this is my photo of a stranger when doing a project that revealed around busses and people who get on them the idea was to capture people unaware like a fly on a wall, this woman saw me with my photographic kit and started talking after a conversation and i explained what i was doing in photography she asked me to take a photo which i did, even though i don't have a name or contact information to even forward her this portrait.
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Anna Mooney

2016 - final body of work  - 
 
"Of Flesh and Bone"


This body of work is a study of human form. It offers an opportunity to see the body through means of abstract obscurity and isolation. This series of images focus on the smaller details of contours, curves, lines and textures; the little things that go unnoticed or that are lost in translation when they feature as part of a whole form.
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Emily Curtin

2016 - final body of work  - 
 
Skin Deep

I always knew the reason I was taking these images, I just never wanted to admit it. I never wanted to show my own weakness through my work. The problem is, is that I tried to come up with so many other reasons behind this and nothing fitted; I looked into cosmetic surgery, into simply abstract art but I couldn’t make anything work, because nothing else was honest, and in my opinion, the work I create must always be honest.

While creating this piece of work, I explored themes that were mainly abstract in some way. Some work was subtler; others were more out there. I also looked into feminism and body image with this work, but ended up on self-portrait, but with out using myself as the model. I explored a few techniques, including medium and large format film, Lith printing, digital and analogue double exposures and experimented with texture.

In truth, it’s about me; it’s about how I feel restricted in what I can do by how the media is constantly putting me down. It’s about how I never feel good enough due to the images I am constantly seeing all over social media and in magazines. It’s about the rashes and blemishes on my skin making me feel self-conscious and wanting to cover up and yet be a peace and free with my body. It’s about confusion, about never knowing what I am doing or what the right road to follow is, and how every decision I make can lead me down a wrong path.

These are self-portraits without using myself; I used an anonymous model to represent me. They were taken in the studio with the use of one soft box on the model and then one facing the backdrop to really brighten it and to create more of a contrast. The prints have come out looking very cold with a blue tone to them
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Taylor Caterer

2016 - final body of work  - 
 
Unlabeled: Taylor Caterer

Through out this body of work I wanted to explore how our stereotypical minds take over when viewing men without even asking or knowing their sexual orientation. I wanted to explore how we judge a book by its cover through portraiture, leaving you as the viewer to take the time to look at the subjects to see what your personal perception is on their sexual orientation. As in todays society you seem to automatically know if someone is gay, straight or bisexual at first glance.

The main theme that made me create this body of work is “Why are straight men seen as more dominant?” We are men and men are one. Regardless of orientation, there is no weakness and no advantage, so why does society have this viewpoint?

Unlabeled and untitled, this leaves the work to be fully interacted with by the audience for them to make their own interpretations of each image. The images are placed shoulder to shoulder in order to embrace the solidarity of men. I chose to have the images in black and white to create a natural feeling, leaving any colour out that could possibly give away hints to the subjects’ identity of orientation. The lack of colour helps you develop your own thoughts.

I took inspiration from Lorna Simpson, her black and white images are accompanied by sub headings which are demining to her subject matter. Her work is strong towards feminism and she portrays this well in a number of her works. I wanted to use Simpsons strong opinions/determination to influence my personal determination to show equality within homosexuality and heterosexuality. I also took inspiration from the presentation of her body of work and used it to showcase my work in a strong and bold frame. This represents my thick-skinned views on this topic.
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Lauren Woods

2016 - final body of work  - 
 
Lauren Woods

'Dream of Us'

Dream of Us is a personal body of work. It explores my personal relationship with sleep and my significant other. I struggle with sleeping and watching him sleep is my calming mechanism.
For me, it was important to portray our story, but also to share such an intimate and rarely seen act using the lens. Furthermore, explore the vulnerability and trust in the portraits themselves.
This work plays with the themes of intimacy and relationships whilst taking an in depth look at sleep and how it interacts with familiarity and proximity between two people. There is a massive amount of trust present in the photos. This is important and key to the project, due to the sensitive and vulnerable nature of the subjects portrayed.

I have used the space in todays showing to show how I would exhibit, however, I also have a digital book I'd love some feedback on!!

http://laurenwoods.co.uk/P0.html
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Laura Dakin

2016 - final body of work  - 
 
Laura Dakin
What Is Normal?

Each day we are faced with the idea of what something or someone should look like to be considered attractive, whether it is our body shape, latest clothing trends or what hair should be on our bodies. However, what we don’t think about is our genitals.

Around the age of 10, we get a special class at school on Sex Education in which we learn about what our genitals are and how they work. I then came to realise that we never got told how our genitals should look, or how they could look.

Due to wanting a better understanding of genitals, and sex, some of us have often turned to watching pornography. We are then faced with even more ideals of how a part of us should typically look. Women in pornography are often cleanly shaven and quite petite with very small labia’s. While men are also often shaven, they do appear to have penises larger than the average penis. This specific image of genitals has been strongly implanted in our minds that it has made it difficult to settle for anything less. We then begin to believe that anything other than what we see in pornography is not considered “normal” or “healthy”.

In addition to this, when we come across the subject genitals, it appears that we only seem to think of sex rather than another organ or a part of our body. Our genitals become uncomfortable to talk about and a subject of dismay because the act of sex is sometimes reflected upon as dirty. From time to time we are often shamed for participating in an activity that is looked upon as only suitable for private pleasure in an intimate relationship with a significant other. However, sex is a healthy experience, meanwhile our genitals are also an organ like any other that have a specific look, function and purpose like our heart or our stomach.

“What Is Normal?" is a body of work that I have created to break those boundaries of what we consider to be normal when it comes to our genitalia. My project shows the diversity throughout both, penises and vaginas, in which display their own individual beauty. With this body of work I aim to display genitalia in it’s original and natural form that is often disguised. The body of work hopes to question whether or not what we thought we knew was just another manipulation that we commonly face with society’s pressures. In this project I am also aiming to move away from the taboo situation with genitalia by photographing them as though I would photograph a person’s portrait.


NOTICE
There is an extra image included in this upload that won't be included in my project submission for this module. I have included it in this post because it is still a work in progress and hope to continue this in the future.
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Mariana Galvao

2016 - final body of work  - 
 
'My grandmothers fair well to youth' is a project based around my closest family member who has gone through a lot in life. I wanted to show this by picturing her body up close and intimate. I mainly focused on death, life and age..Remembering history and how our bodies take part in this. It also started to affect me while getting to this as noticing that my grandmother has been in this earth for 81 years and how now she feels about herself, reflects me in how I don't want to feel when im older, that beauty is beneath it all. It all will be gone soon, so photographing her also made me cope with the fact she's leaving in no time. A very personal project involving fear of death and anxiety of aging and skin.

Title of images:

‘Hands of Land’
‘Blur of Deaf’
‘Mouth of History’
‘Nails of Trunks’
‘Eyes of Sunrise’


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Christina Doyle

2016 - final body of work  - 
 
5th time lucky?

(Sorry the book isn't in the correct order, tried so many times to reorder it, but it doesn't like me)

'5th time lucky?' is a ongoing collection of photographs taken over a period of time documenting a man batteling cancer. The man in the photograph is my Dad. I was able to personaly connect to the photographs I was creating. We found out early in October that my Dad had cancer and I found that documenting the process helped me come to terms with it. This is my Dads fith battle, which inspired the name of the project '5th time lucky?'

'5th time lucky?' was first inspired by artists like George Saxon, who gave a visiting lecture earlier in the project. I started to document my Dads treatment, as part of picturing the body itself, instead of using it a therapeutic photography. However once I started to see the photos, they became a project in themselves as I felt close to it. This has helped both me and my Dad deal with the fact we had to go through treatment again and the possibility that it might not work. The photographs asthetics were more like a ‘fly on the wall’, as I didn’t want them to be staged, but show what life is like each day. I did however take photographs of my Dad being aware, where he stood by old, rusty, decayed surroundings to symbolize the idea of death and age.

The work was exhibited as a photobook. The fact you have to phyiscally hold the book in your hands shows the intamacy and how delecate the subject is. I chose to make a small book, because I felt this made it more personal almost like a family album. The book also includes text which were sourced from a letter written by his doctor. I chose small sections of the letter which gradulaly tell the story along with the photographs, this helped give context to the images.

I wanted the project to be easily accessible to all ages and audiences, making a photobook makes the artwork easier to acesss. I decided to capture the photographs using my DSLR because this was then easier to create the book. It also allowed me to take a number of shots, which I wouldn’t be able to achieve with film.

'5th time lucky?' Is aimed to touch the hearts of those who are and are not affected by cancer. It explores the themes of life, death and uncertain futures.

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Hollie Ocallaghan's profile photoChristina Doyle's profile photo
2 comments
 
Thank you so much +Hollie Ocallaghan 
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About this community

#picbod (Picturing the body) is an open class run for level 1 photography students at Coventry University as part of the BA (Hons) Photography. The classes structured to address complex aesthetic, creative and technical issues along with the visual messages, associated with the photographic encounter with the body. We do this through formal lectures, practical and thematic tasks, the cumulative resolution of which, becomes developed lens based submissions. An essential part of this will be non-paying attendees (you) joining in with us, submitting your work, asking questions and contributing answers. For our attending degree students the class plays a crucial role in both their thematic and practical development. It’s purpose then is to inspire, challenge and maybe even provoke them into producing a number of considered and cogent (outward facing) photographic responses.

Caroline Molloy
moderator

Discussion  - 
This picture of father holding his sick son has fiercely divided opinion on social media.
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Hollie Ocallaghan's profile photoCaroline Molloy's profile photo
2 comments
 
Very good points raised
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Liam Steeples

2016 - final body of work  - 
 
Fight For Every Heartbeat

Working for charities I come across shocking facts and figures from charities one being from Cancer Research UK that 2.5 million people live in the UK with cancer right now and is rising, but when I started working for British Heart Foundation the facts I found out shocked me, with 12 babies being born every day with a heart defect to finding out heart disease can effect anyone at anytime not just those who live an unhealthy life style, it’s already the UK’s biggest killer and estimated by 2020 to be the worlds biggest killer and with a damaged heart you loose a percentage of your heart and it with it over working for that percentage that is dead it can lead to heart failure where your heart shuts down.

I feel a lot of people belief that only the unhealthy people suffer from this so Fight For Every Heart Beat is an impact poster I created in the style of British Heart Foundation posters to try draw viewers and make them realize that this is a matter that need to be attended too and the urgency to get a cure out to the people who are being born with, going through it, or been through it.

Fight For Every Heart Beat features a photograph of heart that stands out to draw viewers in and view the image, with an elegant layout and well placed text the image has a very balanced look and not over powering, text with nice size draws your eyes in, more important information in the text have been highlight red to make the viewer reads the text and with statistic and Facts leave the piece of work yet have these figures play on the viewers mind, convince them to go make a change, help bring an end to heart disease and make them feel like they’re actually mending broken hearts.
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Milo Lethorn

2016 - final body of work  - 
 
'Ideogram2016'

Attempting to pass comment on the landscape of human form and the representation of such in the modern day, 'Ideogram2016' contains within itself a duality; whilst recognising the controversy surrounding supposed sexual liberty there exists an aggressive social censorship for just that. The title of the work stems from an intended satirical element, the placement of emoji, and the role of such as a worldwide ideogrammatic language for the modern day.

The six images that make up the series have a distinct purpose in their adherence to Roland Barthes' theory of the studium, a feedline-like background wash, and the punctum, a visual punchline that sparks attention from the viewer (Barthes 1980). Settled in a hazy, grain clad background is the female form, a consistent studium with no intention to command the attention of the viewer. The punctum then, the supposed intellectual worth of each image, is seemingly slapped upon the work in the guise of a corresponding emoji. With this in mind, 'Ideogram2016' could very well be considered a feminist body of work; despite the apparent reduction of the female form to background haze, it is just that which serves to highlight this abstract state that, through censorship, somewhat exists in reality.

The series makes no attempt at changing the world; only to sit back, have a chat and poke fun at it for a while.
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Anna Tasker

2016 - final body of work  - 
 
‘Near’

My body of work explores the relationships and intimacies between my nearest and dearest, allowing the viewer a glimpse into my personal life. Subjects include my parents, siblings and boyfriend. There is also an element of collaboration and self-portraiture. Many of the shots are deliberately closely cropped to portray intimacy. Almost like an invasion of privacy. The intention being that the viewer should not simply capture a glimpse of the subjects’ appearance, but that they should gain knowledge and insight into the quality of the relationships portrayed. I decided to present the work in black and white as the characteristic features of the body such as blemishes, creases and birthmarks become more accentuated in monochrome. This is particularly true of the skin tones, celebrating the contrast between them. Other images highlight similarity, for example the distinctive and quirky bone structure of Father and Daughter’s hands and feet.
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Charlotte Bamford

2016 - final body of work  - 
 
This body of work "Many Faces" focuses on the differing facial expressions of my friends in conversation with each other. I have always been told that you can tell a lot about how a person is feeling through their face and as I continued to photograph my friends I noticed this more and more. I think there is a certain amount of vulnerability in a persons face as it tells you more about their thoughts and feelings than body language in any other form. Often people's faces involuntarily show their reaction to something even if they don't intend to show it.
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Paulina Cetnarska

2016 - final body of work  - 
 
'Antibodies' is a project that explores on my phobia and fear of being in non sterile places. Wanted to show the presence of bacteria on our body and that even we cannot see it and feel it it is there.
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Shannon Dillon

2016 - final body of work  - 
 
‘Small changes’
Shannon Dillon

This body of work depicts a visual representation of how people want to redesign their body. The small road workers create a symbol of the subconscious and faulty thinking in the sense that the subject wants to change her body. The emphasis being around ‘workers’ due to the figures reworking the body. I have toned the image using sepia toner not only to show what I have learnt during the course of this module but also because the sepia effect is often used to make a photograph look old, therefore the fact that the image has this effect suggests that this topic around being insecure about your body has been happening for years.
I aim to present the images 8x6 inches in a black frame on the wall at eye height. I feel that the size of the image will make the viewer look closer at the image and focus on the details, whilst preserving its clarity.


please excuse the quality, I couldn't work out how to scan the images on my printer so took photographs.
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Megan Bradley

2016 - final body of work  - 
 
'Not a Victim'
My body of work expores the fear many women have of post mastectomy bodies, wondering how they can feel feminine again after a feature that makes them inherently female has been taken away. In the central images I demonstrate that finding feminine beauty in yourself is still possible, even if I myself find comprehending that this could be a reality for me in the future difficult to accept.
I used the themes explored in Picturing the Body to explore how my mother has seamlessly integrated her post operation body into her lifestyle, the prosthesis boxes blending in well on her dressing table as puts them on in the morning.
The series is set in my mother’s bedroom where morning light through the window frames her body as she dresses, this is not only to accentuate her beauty to us as we view her but also to highlight what she sees as she looks into the dressing table mirror.
I incorporated self-portraiture into my series to help work through my fear of history repeating itself with me. Watching my mother get so sick for so long was difficult as a child, and although seeing her positivity in the present over what happened to her is a great comfort to me, I still cannot help but reflect on how she has viewed herself in the past and worry that I wont be able to reach the same place of acceptance of the permanent changes my body may someday undergo in order to save my life.
The name of my work comes from what my mother has constantly reminded me of while we have undergone this collaboration together, she never wanted to be painted as a victim of cancer because she doesn’t see herself as one.
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Abby McLean

2016 - final body of work  - 
 
‘I’m just a child of nature’

This body of work represents my adoration towards nature. Growing up in the countryside, nature has always been a huge part of my life; I never fully appreciated it when I was younger. Since moving to Coventry going back home was something I appreciated much more than I thought, I missed having the countryside on my doorstep to go out walking and to be able to clear my head. Collaborating the theme of nature and my body was significant to me, I have grown to love my figure so immersing myself with nature connects these two together.

The three final images at the end stem from the idea of looking back at my childhood, looking back at old photographs my mum and dad took and venturing back to those places. Portraying an older, more mature me displaying my body in an artistic way.
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Georgia Hutchins

2016 - final body of work  - 
 
'Naked'

My body of work explores John Berger's definition of 'nude' and 'naked', ('to be naked is to be oneself. To be nude is to be seen as naked by others and yet not recognized for oneself'.) and how women's bodies are viewed in art and society.

The word ‘naked’, parallels natural vulnerability in seeing yourself for who you are as a person as well as physically. I have also used Jacques Lacan notion of The Mirror Phase to explore how women look at their own bodies when naked and influences society has on the way women critique themselves.

Adopting a similar concept as Jenny Saville’s Closed Contact, my work rejects the view of sexually objectifying women’s bodies in society, creating a broarder sense of what is considered beautiful.
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