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Al Clark

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"Brutalism, which reflected the bleak worldview of existentialism so pervasive in the 1950s, reveled in its uncouthness and flagrant lack of finesse in much the same way that the Angry Young Men of postwar British literature, drama, and filmmaking flaunted their contempt for anything that hinted at poshness, polish, or privilege. Where Calder sees Brutalism’s confidence and optimism, others perceive a palpable angst and inward-turning defensiveness that make many of these designs seem more like penal institutions or military emplacements than housing estates, arts centers, or schools sponsored by an egalitarian and beneficent welfare state."

Via http://www.artsjournal.com/
Literature that takes a wistful backward glance at the outmoded manners and mores of the previous forty or fifty years has a direct parallel in architecture. Time and again we have seen reawakened interest in the disdained buildings of two generations earlier, a span still within living memory but not quite yet history.
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Al Clark

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Messynessy writes: "I came across this photograph and assumed it must be a film set from a 1960s sci-fi flick. Surely those nuns haven’t just come from a prayer session inside that monstrous building? As it turns out, this picture of architectural doom is indeed of a real Catholic church, located in a small medieval hamlet close to Dusseldorf, Germany. One of Brutalism’s finest, it is the work of Gottfried Böhm, hailed as the “son, grandson, husband, and father of architects.”"
I came across this photograph and assumed it must be a film set from a 1960s sci-fi flick. Surely those nuns haven't just come from a prayer session inside that monstrous building? As it turns out, this picture of architectural doom is indeed of a real Catholic church, located in a small medieval ha
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I made a pilgrimage earlier this year, photographing 37 Yugoslav monuments across 6 countries. This write-up features all of the usual suspects, plus a few lesser-known surprises.

Not everything here could be called 'brutalist,' I should add – but enough of it ought to appeal that I felt this was a relevant place to post it.
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Al Clark

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"‘For us,’ Steffen Ahrends told his son Peter, who was born in Berlin in 1933, ‘the history of architecture started with the Soviet 1917 revolution.’ It wasn’t entirely a joke. For many designers in the Weimar Republic, and for subsequent generations of modernist hardliners, 1917 had made possible a reconstruction of life on collective, egalitarian and, above all, planned lines. That meant a central position for architects, who would have the unprecedented opportunity of designing buildings for an entirely new form of society"

A collection of reviews sadly hidden behind a paywall. 
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Al Clark

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"Simon Thurley, former head of English Heritage, warns 20th-century buildings risk becoming ‘black hole’ in history "
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Al Clark

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"Since its completion in 1972, Robin Hood Gardens estate in east London has garnered much attention, due to its monumental brutalist form and, latterly, its dilapidated condition. Dismayed by the absence of the residents’ views in any coverage of the estate – which is due to be demolished after English Heritage declared that it “fails as a place for humans to live” – London-based photographer Kois Miah and sociologist Nick Thoburn embarked on a project to capture the views of its last inhabitants. “I know the estate generated a lot of negativity,” Miah says, “but it was nothing like its reputation. Of course, it had its problems, but people loved their time there.”
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Al Clark

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"Despite a decade or so of unexpected popularity, at least among architects and planners, Brutalism went out of favor by the mid-’70s. Films such as “A Clockwork Orange” turned Brutalist masterpieces into symbols of future dystopia."
The complicated revival of the simply honest brand of architecture.
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Al Clark

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"Australian trade unions have banned construction workers from demolishing one of Sydney's only brutalist buildings, which failed in its bid for heritage listing earlier this summer."
Australian trade unions have banned workers from demolishing one of Sydney's only brutalist buildings, which failed in its bid for heritage listing
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Al Clark

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"7 beautiful modernist structures that look out of this world. "
7 beautiful modernist structures that look out of this world.
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About this community

This Community is all about Brutalist Architecture and Concrete Structures. The term "Brutalism" derived from the french term "béton brut" which means nothing else than decorative concrete. This architectural style emerged in the early 1950s and had its height in the 60s and 70s. Please no advertising! You will get banned immediately. At *Discussion* you can post photographs of Concrete structures of these style. Please post mainly your own photographs. At *Weblinks* you can post every link that is connected to Brutalist Architecture. At *Events* I post actual events like exhibitions about brutalism.
 
For centuries, churches took the form of ornate temples embellished with sculptures, cornices, tympanums, mosaics, and stained glass — each a measure of the ...
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Photos of Yugoslav monuments known as spomeniks are often shared online, exoticised and wrenched from context. But now, argues Owen Hatherley, it is vital that we make the effort to understand what they truly represent
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Al Clark

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"Photos of Yugoslav monuments known as spomeniks are often shared online, exoticised and wrenched from context. But now, argues Owen Hatherley, it is vital that we make the effort to understand what they truly represent"
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Al Clark

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"Architecture critic for The New York Times, Nicolai Ouroussoff, said described Nakagin as “gorgeous architecture; like all great buildings, it is the crystallization of a far-reaching cultural ideal. Its existence also stands as a powerful reminder of paths not taken, of the possibility of worlds shaped by different sets of values.”"
The Nagakin Capsule Tower is one of the most important buildings in postwar architectural history in Japan, once praised as the 'future of housing', a rare remaining example of the Japanese Metabolism movement and the world's first examples of capsule architecture built for permanent and practical u
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Al Clark

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Brutalist sandcastles. Not as odd as it sounds.

h/t +Bas Bleu
“I always had an affinity for architecture which I attribute to growing up in a neighborhood and town that was consta...
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Hey guys?

Guys?

Guys!

Did you know that there's a tumblr about waffle slabs?
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Al Clark

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"Grey concrete flats, generic office blocks, a grimly rising skyscraper … photographer Sandra Jordan loves them all"
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OK man
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Al Clark

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Al Clark

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"Readers may use their own backgrounds and interests to frame the 80 underground sites surveyed here, but the differing storytelling styles allow a few rich stories to shine through."

Not too off-topic I trust.
Readers may use their own backgrounds and interests to frame the 80 underground sites surveyed here, but the differing storytelling styles allow a few rich stories to shine through.
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Thomas Reisser
owner

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10 of the most imposing concrete creations
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