Post has attachment
"Durham’s student union building, once graced by Thelonius Monk, is a brutalist gem in need of renovation, not demolition"

Post has attachment
"By crafting tiny paper replicas of brutalist London buildings, the design studio Zupagrafika encourages a better appreciation for concrete architecture."

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
"Nowadays, the relics from each of Cuba’s architectural periods stand side-by-side in an awkward, colourful mess. Art Deco hotels look out onto 1970s Sovietesque tower blocks. At Miramar, that Russian embassy leers over colonial palaces like some giant concrete monster from the future. Walking around the streets of Havana one gets the feeling that many of these buildings continue to exist simply because no one can afford to pull them down."

Post has attachment
"Brutalism, which reflected the bleak worldview of existentialism so pervasive in the 1950s, reveled in its uncouthness and flagrant lack of finesse in much the same way that the Angry Young Men of postwar British literature, drama, and filmmaking flaunted their contempt for anything that hinted at poshness, polish, or privilege. Where Calder sees Brutalism’s confidence and optimism, others perceive a palpable angst and inward-turning defensiveness that make many of these designs seem more like penal institutions or military emplacements than housing estates, arts centers, or schools sponsored by an egalitarian and beneficent welfare state."

Via http://www.artsjournal.com/

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
Messynessy writes: "I came across this photograph and assumed it must be a film set from a 1960s sci-fi flick. Surely those nuns haven’t just come from a prayer session inside that monstrous building? As it turns out, this picture of architectural doom is indeed of a real Catholic church, located in a small medieval hamlet close to Dusseldorf, Germany. One of Brutalism’s finest, it is the work of Gottfried Böhm, hailed as the “son, grandson, husband, and father of architects.”"

Post has attachment
I made a pilgrimage earlier this year, photographing 37 Yugoslav monuments across 6 countries. This write-up features all of the usual suspects, plus a few lesser-known surprises.

Not everything here could be called 'brutalist,' I should add – but enough of it ought to appeal that I felt this was a relevant place to post it.

Post has shared content
Photos of Yugoslav monuments known as spomeniks are often shared online, exoticised and wrenched from context. But now, argues Owen Hatherley, it is vital that we make the effort to understand what they truly represent

Post has attachment
"Photos of Yugoslav monuments known as spomeniks are often shared online, exoticised and wrenched from context. But now, argues Owen Hatherley, it is vital that we make the effort to understand what they truly represent"
Wait while more posts are being loaded