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To be a parent is to LOVE UNCONDITIONALLY!! I never knew that feeling until my daughter entered my life. If not for her LIFE FOR ME WOULD BE LESS MEANINGFUL. I LOVE YOU B.O.U.~B.O.U.!!
( Being Of Union~Being Of Uniqueness )

~DAD
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3/22/15
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Now I need you more than ever... said every child to their dad.

My son always wants to be with me, nothing wrong with that. But when he doesn't want mommy around and says that to her it's wrong. How do I go about fixing this issue? It got to the point where she cried and I had to get on to him about saying things like that. So I ask my fellow Dads out there, what steps do I need to take to resolve this? Any help is appreciated.

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Go ahead and enjoy that glass of whiskey 

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A simple but powerful truth.

I'm a stay at home dad.

“Oh it must be so easy, at home all day, watching telly, eating biscuits and drinking brews whenever you want. Just a bit of tidying up in the afternoon and your day is done. Easy life.”

There isn’t a mum or housewife who hasn’t heard a variant of the above, and there isn’t a stay at home parent who hasn’t steamed through their ears and momentarily forgotten their vow of non violence as in their mind they see a swift knee to the solar plexus (or lower) of the, usually, male distributor of domestic knowledge.

But is it any different for a stay at home dad? Well, the short answer is YES. We men are different. Where the multitasking, multifunctioning mum just does, we men initially struggle. We are predisposed to order, we love lists (read any Chris Evans book if you don’t believe me), just doing takes effort (and normally a list) and a lot of time.

Through this blog, I am to let the inner workings of a stay at home dad be unleashed on the outside world. How do we deal with the every day existence of little people, the lack of adult contact and most importantly, finding enough paper to write lists.

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How to help kids deal with traumatic events

Dr. Rob Dindinger - Child & Family Psychology
1. Filter Information
2. Offer Support
3. Understand kids deal with worry
4. Talk to kids
5. Keep lines of communication open.
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