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UNBOXING A QUANTUM COMPUTER!

I strongly recommend to seeing this viral video on quantum computing. One million people saw this video with in a day.

//The coldest place in the known universe is on Earth! It's quantum computing company D-Wave's HQ, and they actually let Linus in!//

#Quantum #QuantumResearch #QuantumComputing #QuantumComputer # LinusTechTips

http://www.quantumcomputingtechnologyaustralia.com/2017/07/07/unboxing-a-quantum-computer/


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This could be used to magnetize the rubidium atom and it's 37 protons to attach to each other so that a structure could be formed to a size that wuold be far greater than ever made before. Just an idea as its possible to do it. As the rubidium are electrically charged therfore they would be structured in a hexagonal shape to any size.

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Precise quantum cloning opens up important experimental possibilities as well as having applications in ultra- secure long distance quantum networks.

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FOM workgroup leader Lieven Vandersypen and his colleagues within the QuTech research centre and the Kavli Institute for Nanosciences ( Delft University of Technology) have succeeded for the first time in enabling two non- neighbouring quantum bits in the form of electron spins in semiconductors to communicate with each other.

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Researchers at the University of Oxford have achieved a quantum logic gate with record-breaking 99,9 % precision, reaching the benchmark required theoretically to build a quantum computer.
Achieving a logic gate with 99,9 % precision is another important milestone on the road to developing a quantum computer. A quantum logic gate on its own does not constitute a quantum computer, but you can, t build the computer without them.

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A team of researchers, led by University of Maryland Physics Professor Christopher Monroe, has introduced the first fully programmable and reconfigurable quantum computer module.
The new device, dubbed a module because of its potential to connect with copies of itself, takes advantage of the unique properties offered by trapped ions to run any algorithm of five qubits -- thr fundamental unit of information in a quantum computer.

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The humble household light bulb – once a simple source of illumination – could soon be transformed into the backbone of a revolutionary new wireless communications network based on visible light. Harald Haas explains how this “LiFi” system works and how it could shape our increasingly data-driven world

Over the past year the world’s computers, mobile phones and other devices generated an estimated 12 zettabytes (1021 bytes) of information. By 2020 this data deluge is predicted to increase to 44 zettabytes – nearly as many bits as there are stars in the universe. There will also be a corresponding increase in the amount of data transmitted over communications networks, from 1 to 2.3 zettabytes. The total mobile traffic including smartphones will be 30 exabytes (1018 bytes). A vast amount of this increase will come from previously uncommunicative devices such as home appliances, cars, wearable electronics and street furniture as they become part of the so-called “Internet of Things”, transmitting some 335 petabytes (1015 bytes) of status information, maintenance data and video to their owners and users for services such as augmented reality.
In some fields, this data-intensive future is already here. A wind turbine, for example, creates 10 terabytes of data per day for operational and maintenance purposes and to ensure optimum performance. But by 2020 there could be as many as 80 billion data-generating devices all trying to communicate with us and with each other − often across large distances, and usually without a wired connection.
So far, the resources required to achieve this wireless connectivity have been taken almost entirely from the radio frequency (RF) part of the electromagnetic spectrum (up to 300 GHz). However, the anticipated exponential increase in data volumes during the next decade will make it increasingly hard to accomplish this with RF alone. The RF spectrum “map” of the US is already very crowded (figure 1), with large chunks of frequency space allocated to services such as satellite communication, military and defence, aeronautical communication, terrestrial wireless communication and broadcast. In many cases, the same frequency band is used for multiple services. So how are we going to accommodate perhaps 70 billion additional communication devices?

http://live.iop-pp01.agh.sleek.net/physicsworld/reader/#!edition/editions_Aug-2016/article/page-14798

http://live.iop-pp01.agh.sleek.net/2016/07/21/a-light-connected-world/pugpig_index.html


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A new Type of Quantum Bit

In approaches using conventional semiconductor materials, scientists typically created qubits in the form of individual electrons. However , this caused dephesing, and the information carriers were difficult to program and read. Now, researchers from the University of Basel, Ruhr University Bochum, and the Universite de Lyon have overcome this problem by using holes - instead of electrons - to create qubits.

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