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MEMS Oscillator Market by Packaging Type Surface-Mount Device Package - 2022 | MarketsandMarkets

MEMS Oscillator Market categorizes global market by Packaging Type (Surface-Mount Device Package and Chip-Scale Package), Band (MHz and kHz), General Circuitry (SPMO, TCMO, VCMO, FSMO, DCMO, and SSMO), Application, and Geography."

According to the forecast provided by MarketsandMarkets, the overall MEMS oscillator market was valued at USD 79.2 Million in 2016 and is expected to reach USD 802.8 Million by 2022, at a CAGR of 46.08% between 2017 and 2022.

The growth of this market is driven by the rapid growth of electronic wearables, Internet of Things, and mobile infrastructure.

Along with this, the rising need for electronic device miniaturization, improved performance, and increased functionality entails a growing demand for MEMS oscillators owing to their inherent advantages such as small size, high reliability, and low power consumption.

Get More Information@
http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/mems-oscillator-market-225020975.html

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If you need better resolution with an Arduino for analog input, try one of these.   12bit resolution, I2C.

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The Auto-Flora Project

Over the past few days I have been working on a small Arduino-based project that I have tentatively referred to as the Auto-Flora Project. The concept of the project is simple, outdoor plants should be able to water themselves as needed to help alleviate the adverse effects of accidental neglect and human error. After its second day of successful testing, it appears as though the project is working as intended.


How it works 

The Auto-Flora Project makes use of a water solenoid valve, a moisture sensor, and an ATTiny85 micro-controller. The ATTiny85 checks the moisture sensor every ten minutes and keeps a running average of the soil's electrical resistance. If it the soil is determined to have a high electrical resistance, it is assumed to be dry as the presence of moisture will lower the resistance.

After an hour, the running average of the resistance is compared to specific thresholds that I have set by running various moisture/resistance tests. If the resistance is found to be within a threshold that is considered dry, the ATTiny85 opens the valve inside of the water solenoid for a few seconds. The amount of time that the valve is opened is negatively correlated to the moisture in the soil to ensure the soil stays moist.

The LEDs on the outside of the box signify the status of the program running on the microcontroller. The green LED simply represents that five volts are present at the VCC pin of the ATTiny85. The yellow LED is set to blink at different rates in order to provide feedback of the measured soil moisture. Rapid blinking of the yellow LED means that the plants will receive water on the next water cycle. 


Conclusion

The project seems to be a success so far and deserves full project documentation which I plan to provide on my blog. I have plans to design and order PCBs made for this project and I may market them depending on interest. 

What a great time to be a plant. 
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2015-07-04
3 Photos - View album

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I have been working with lpc2129 microcontroller. It says we can use VPB divider to decide the PCLK. But I am not able to determine the crystal oscillator frequency. It says its in the range of 1 MHz to 30 MHz. How do I find the correct crystal frequency of lpc2129 microcontroller?

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So I recently purchased one of the Resistive touch TFT displays that work with the Raspberry Pi/B/2.   I was psyched to get it because I would finally be able to have a self contained unit and not have to find the elusive HDMI port and keyboard.    Realizing that its small and would be somewhat limited, I was ok with that because I was looking at it for some very specific tasks that involved a camera.     The installation was relatively easy, and it worked right out of the box.   I do have to commend them for that.   It came with a DVD (God help you if you don't have a DVD drive!) and that included an image which was easily installed onto a microSD (4GB) using the included software.   Instructions were easy to follow even for a beginner.

It worked beautifully, although I must say it was a bit unnerving at first when it flickered considerably upon every screen update.   But you get used to it and it actually tends to smooth out after a while.

The first set of issues came into play when I looked at the connector.   The connector was an extended dual inline edge connector that partially fits over the GPIO connector.   The issue being that it does not really leave any room for any additional connections to be used.   It covers the first 25-30 pins where most all of the signals that amount to anything reside.   And especially in my case where I needed I2C and SPI, it covered those channels.

Well, since I've been brushing up on my soldering techniques I  figured this would not stop me.   So I carefully soldered some extra wires onto the back of the GPIO connector to pull off the signals I needed for VIN, I2C, SPI, and CS0 or CS1.

The real issue came into play when I started looking at the fbtft driver which is used with the display unit.   Not only does it steal the spi0.0 using CS0 for the display communication, but it also goes on to steal the spi0.1 using CS1 for the touch screen.   I didn't continue on to check if it also takes over the I2C, but since there is a plethora of possible addresses that is much more forgiving than SPI.    

So in conclusion, unless you're looking to create custom SPI drivers with a CS0/CS1 multiplex arrangement, using the fbtft LCD/TFT touch screen display is not the way to go if you have any devices that plan on using SPI for communication.

I'm back to the drawing board unless I can find an easy way to create a CS2 or CS3 for some additional SPI channels.

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Slightly off topic, I have been having really good results with the Proto-pasta conductive filament.  They gave me a free sample roll for doing e-NABLE work and I've been reviewing it for them.  Prints really smooth and conducts electricity as advertised.  Interestingly the meter "counts" when measuring, indicating some capacitance - perhaps due to variation in resistivity vertically on each layer?  
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NEW PRODUCTS – Adafruit FONA 808 – Mini Cellular GSM + GPS Breakout / Passive GPS Antenna uFL – 9mm x 9mm 2dBi gain / Passive GPS Antenna uFL – 15mm x 15mm 1 dBi gain

Adafruit FONA 808 - Mini Cellular GSM + GPS Breakouthttps://www.adafruit.com/products/2542

Passive GPS Antenna uFL - 9mm x 9mm -2dBi gainhttps://www.adafruit.com/products/2460

Passive GPS Antenna uFL - 15mm x 15mm 1 dBi gainhttps://www.adafruit.com/products/2461

Adafruit FONA 808 – Mini Cellular GSM + GPS Breakout

Cellular + GPS tracking, all in one? Oh yes! Introducing Adafruit FONA 808 MiniGSM + GPS, an all-in-one cellular phone module with that lets you add location-tracking, voice, text, SMS and data to your project in an adorable little package. (It does not contain a drum machine, tho)

This module measures only 1.75″x1.6″ but packs a surprising amount of technology into it’s little frame. At the heart is a powerfull GSM cellular module (we use the latest SIM808) with integrated GPS. This module can do just about everything.

Tons more information on the product page!

As well as more comprehensive run through as well as downloads on our tutorial!

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Passive GPS Antenna uFL – 9mm x 9mm 2dBi gain

Wow that’s a tiny GPS antenna! This passive antenna is only 9mm x 9mm x 6.5mm in size, with a 50mm long uFL cable. Great for when you want to keep things small.

Comes with a standard uFL connector on the end. Perfect for our FONA 808! Not good for our Ultimate GPS breakouts/shields/hat as those are designed for active antennas.

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Passive GPS Antenna uFL – 15mm x 15mm 1 dBi gain

Wow that’s a tiny GPS antenna! This passive antenna is only 15mm x 15mm x 6.8mm in size, with a 50mm long uFL cable. Great for when you want to keep things small.

Comes with a standard uFL connector on the end. Perfect for our FONA 808! Not good for our Ultimate GPS breakouts/shields/hat as those are designed for active antennas.

Adafruit FONA 808 - Mini Cellular GSM + GPS Breakout - https://www.adafruit.com/products/2542

Passive GPS Antenna uFL - 9mm x 9mm -2dBi gain - https://www.adafruit.com/products/2460

Passive GPS Antenna uFL - 15mm x 15mm 1 dBi gain - https://www.adafruit.com/products/2461

All in stock and shipping now!
#newproducts   #wireless   #antennas   #fona   #gps   #gsm   #ufl  
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2015-05-29
12 Photos - View album
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