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"""Texas Instruments proved it to be possible to embed FeRAM cells using two additional masking steps[citation needed] during conventional CMOS semiconductor manufacture. Flash typically requires nine masks. [...] Texas Instruments have incorporated an amount of FRAM memory into its MSP430 microcontrollers in its new FRAM series.[9]"""

I was wondering what could possibly have motivated Texas Instruments to put magnetic memory into its MSP430 series[1]. Lower cost makes perfect sense.

[1] http://www.ti.com/mcu/docs/mcuproductcontentnp.tsp?familyId=1751&sectionId=95&tabId=2840&family=mcu

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Also found in the comments of Jeri's video, along with part 2 "Basic Circuits" :  MAGNETIC CORES - PART II - BASIC CIRCUITS

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I happened across a 2005 PhD thesis by  +Alexandra Joshi-Imre, here's a multi-line quote from the abstract: """
Nanomagnets that exhibit only two stable states of magnetization can represent digital bits. Magnetic random access memories store binary information in such nanomagnets, and currently, fabrication of dense arrays of nanomagnets is also under development for application in hard disk drives. The latter faces the challenge of avoiding magnetic dipole interactions between the individual elements in the arrays, which limits data storage density. On the contrary, these interactions are utilized in the magnetic quantum-dot cellular automata (MQCA) system, which is a network of closely-spaced, dipole-coupled, single-domain nanomagnets designed for digital computation.
"""
In short, cellular automata can be Turing complete[1], so exploit the coupling to produce magnetic logic.
This lines up with the approach given in the Bennion, Crane, Nitzan book I originally purchased. Coupling would be perfect for the purely magnetic computer systems they describe.
This thesis has 30 citations, [2] mostly from the same group at Notre Dame.
While I haven't dug into any of the citations yet, Notre Dame looks they're researching how current semiconductor technologies can be applied to nanomagnetic computers.

[1] as is Conway's Game of Life http://www.igblan.free-online.co.uk/igblan/ca/
[2] http://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=9296146427143599592&as_sdt=205&sciodt=0,1&hl=en

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They used to wire the bits up BY HAND?

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Another fun link found in the comments of Jeri's video, this freely available 1960 book hosted on archive.org describes magnetic amplifiers. The introductory section of this book is a very clear and readable introduction to magnetism and electricity.

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I found this article mentioned in the comments of Jeri Ellsworth's recent video. I hadn't heard of the Landauer Limit before.

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+Jeri Ellsworth made a video that gives an introduction to digital magnetic logic. If you want to understand how a ferrite core can act as a logic gate, this is a good introduction.

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As she says at the beginning, Jeri Ellsworth based her video on this book.
Now it's on my Amazon wish list.

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I spent an hour or so discussing this book with my friend +Scott Kelley and he gave me a much better idea of how the authors structured their magnetic logic. Next steps include figuring out how they produced a magnetic clock source, and seeing how the authors physically structured their three-ring logic.

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