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Joshua Fisher
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General Discussion  - 
 
Via +David Wees.
I was stunned by a recent report from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation on teachers' discouraged views of professional development and had to learn more.
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Joshua Fisher
owner

Research  - 
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Joshua Fisher's profile photoFred Peck's profile photo
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Also this:
Cole, M., and E. Subbotsky. 1993. The fate of stages past: Reflections on the heterogeneity of thinking from the perspective of cultural-historical psychology.

http://lchc.ucsd.edu/People/MCole/Scweizerische.pdf
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Joshua Fisher
owner

General Discussion  - 
 
 
Day 113: Popcorn
Fawn Nguyen and Julie Reulbach are two of the most amazing math teachers that I have ever met.  They are passionate, creative, funny, kind and clever.  They never fail to inspire and motivate me to develop better and more interesting lessons. Mostly, that i...
Fawn Nguyen and Julie Reulbach are two of the most amazing math teachers that I have ever met.  They are passionate, creative, funny, kind and clever.  They never fail to inspire and motivate me to develop better and more int...
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Joshua Fisher
owner

Algebra  - 
 
We all have our methods of helping students gain an understanding of this: Let's start simple as most of us do in the classroom.  In years past, I (and many others) have helped students explore thi...
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Zaida Berrios's profile photoAndrew Hyland's profile photo
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Joshua Fisher
owner

General Discussion  - 
 
Semmelweis. Project Follow Through. Links. Nice piece.
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I was getting a big head start on the reading for #howpeoplelearn (http://goo.gl/lUT5k5) when I came across a section that likely bugged me the first time I read it as well.

It features a very popular magic trick—a rhetorical sleight-of-hand—that is extremely popular but not, in my opinion, well thought out, since it sets up a false dichotomy.

It goes like this: (1) when you talk about facts and knowledge, mention textbooks and tests and explanations or questions out of context, (2) give a nod to how important facts and knowledge are, then (3) when you mention understanding, change the subject to human beings and their thinking:

Textbooks are filled with facts that students are expected to memorize, and most tests assess students' abilities to remember the facts.  When studying about veins and arteries, for example, students may be expected to remember that arteries are thicker than veins, more elastic, and carry blood from the heart; veins carry blood back to the heart . . .

[example of a multiple-choice test question]

The new science of learning does not deny that facts are important for thinking and problem solving.  Research on expertise in areas such as chess, history, science, and mathematics demonstrate that experts' abilities to think and solve problems depend strongly on a rich body of knowledge about subject matter (e.g., Chase and Simon, 1973; Chi et al., 1981; deGroot, 1965). However, the research also shows clearly that "usable knowledge" is not the same as a mere list of disconnected facts.  Experts' knowledge is connected and organized around important concepts (e.g., Newton's second law of motion); it is "conditionalized" to specify the contexts in which it is applicable; it supports understanding and transfer (to other contexts) rather than only the ability to remember.

See how it's done? When they talk about those "mere facts" there isn't a person in sight. At best, human beings are the implicit objects of textbook and assessment content. Then, when they talk about understanding, it is as though we are looking "on the other hand." But that's only because they left human beings (and some context) out of the story in the first part and brought them back in for the second.

Anyway, there's me again playing my facts-and-knowledge broken record.  : )
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About this community

Welcome to the Mathematics Education (K-12) Community on Google+! This is a forum for all stakeholders--teachers, students, mathematicians, researchers, and laypersons. The only requirement is that you have an interest in mathematics education.

Joshua Fisher
owner

Common Core  - 
 
"+Achieve is looking for units to support Common Core instruction in both ELA/Literacy and Math. If you have a unit that you’ve created, on your own or collaboratively with your district, consider submitting it for review by Achieve’s EQuIP (Educators Evaluating the Quality of Instructional Products [http://www.achieve.org/equip]) peer reviewers. There will be an award of $1,500 for units rated exemplary within the following areas:

 - Addition and Subtraction (1st-2nd)
 - Fractions (3rd-5th)
 - Ratio and Proportion (6th-7th)
 - Geometry (8th)
 - Speaking and Listening (2nd-5th)
 - Supports for English Learners (2nd-5th)
 - Topical Reading and Writing (4th-8th)

All Exemplar units will be made freely available for download and use by educators across the country. If you are interested, review the submission details (http://goo.gl/cRnKQl) and then register and submit your materials online (http://lessons.achieve.org/). There will be two review cycles through which prizes will be awarded; the first deadline for submitting units is March 20, 2015 and the second is June 3, 2015."
The objectives are two-fold: Increase the supply of high quality lessons and units aligned to the. CCSS that are available to elementary, middle, and high school teachers as soon as possible; and; Build the capacity of educators to evaluate and improve the quality of instructional materials for ...
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Joshua Fisher
owner

Research  - 
 
Via +Raymond Johnson. I have never heard of these before. Is this a new thing?
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Raymond Johnson's profile photoJoshua Fisher's profile photo
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Wowza.
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Joshua Fisher
owner

Technology  - 
 
“We tend to think millennials are really savvy in this area. But that’s not what we are seeing,” researcher says.
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I question whether tech "saavyness" is something you can measure with this kind of test. I looked at a few of the questions and they could easily be irrelevant to how people actually work with technology. There are always multiple ways to get things accomplished on a computer, many of which were not the intended use of the software developers. 
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Joshua Fisher
owner

Number & Operation  - 
 
From +Chris Hunter:
I'm picking "TNIFHS" back up. At the end of Part 1, I promised Part 2 would answer "What are the big ideas in elementary school mathematics that students will need for high school?" Instead, I talk...
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Joshua Fisher
owner

Geometry  - 
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Kate Nowak's profile photoManuel Alzurutt's profile photoTim Murphy's profile photo
 
Thanks Joshua!
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Joshua Fisher
owner

Common Core  - 
This blog post provides student videos to help convince teachers as to why depth of knowledge (DOK) is critical to implement in mathematics classrooms
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Joshua Fisher's profile photoLilliana Vendra's profile photoDr. Steven Edgar's profile photoManuel Alzurutt's profile photo
 
The videos here are amazing.

Same situation where I work, and my analysis there shows that students are okay at "Find the . . .," "What is/are the . . ."--type identification questions and have an unnecessarily confused reaction to problems that don't fit this mold.

I notice in the video how quickly students start writing just anything after the question has been asked.
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Melanie Thomas

Number & Operation  - 
 
A lot of math practice, having fun and playing a game.
http://wp.me/p4RzWA-bh
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Joshua Fisher
owner

General Discussion  - 
 
Couple of interesting quotations:

If teachers know correct mathematics, the substance of the MPS [Mathematical Practice Standards] would be a natural side effect of this knowledge.

Let us bring closure to this discussion. TSM [Textbook School Mathematics] comes from school textbooks, so why not just concentrate on getting rid of TSM by writing better textbooks? Two reasons: (1) The vicious circle syndrome: Staff writers in major publishers are themselves products of TSM. (2)  The bottom-line mentality: In order to maximize the sales of their books, publishers do not publish anything teachers (products of TSM) don’t feel comfortable reading.
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TopperLearning

General Discussion  - 
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