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Nicole Hill

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Hello my name is Nicole and I'm a self published author with a small publishing company. I'm looking forward to connecting with you guys!
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Steve Turnbull's profile photo
3 comments
 
Ah, gotcha :-)
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This is quite a good video on how to create good video. Might be able to apply it to writing
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-YLGUn4Hzs
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It goes without saying that a book in which all scenes are interesting is generally going to be better than a book where some scenes are boring due laziness.
Therefore, I must pose a question, as I am struggling with a scene.
There is an interview of sorts. An admissions interview that my main character must do well in in order to be admitted into a school of his choice.
I've described in detail the process that led up to the interview, and I've been told that it was entertaining and talented writing, but...
I can't think of any way to make an interview scene interesting. It would be possible to infuse it with the tension that comes with the uncertainty of whether my character is doing well, but then the questions asked must be difficult for him to answer without being unfair.
I could describe the interview process without delving into the scene itself, but that would contradict the effort of describing the process up to that point.
So tell me, if you were writing an interview scene, how would you make it interesting? I would appreciate anything from a comprehensive analysis of an interesting interview scene to a self-written example. Anything that helps.
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Mark David's profile photoLingering Meme (Jio)'s profile photo
14 comments
 
+Salome Jones
I think the University interviews are so good because the Masters only have a few minutes to spend on each student, so the questions are just quickfire. It's somehow interesting to hear all these questions about things that don't exist in our world and how Patrick writes out Kvothes thought process to solve them.
Also, we have the tension of Kvothes general state of poverty and the fact that most people, if not all of them, have tuition set at twenty or so talents, more than Kvothe could dream of getting in time.
On top of this is the part at the end where Kvothe convinces them to give him two talents as tuition. His impressive feats stretch far, but this is one of the most impressive things he does in the first book.

While I can say that with certainty, comparing myself to Patrick Rothfuss only leads to telling myself that whatever I've written isn't good enough until I'm burned out.
But yes, maybe I can learn from a few of the things he did with Kvothe. If ever there was an entertaining interview scene, that was it.
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Kevin Reed

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Was wondering how many here still use the Writers Market book for finding markets, or do you use other sources?
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Samantha Dunaway Bryant's profile photo
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I have a few questions:
Is there a wrong way to start writing a book? If so, what is it? What are some right ways to start writing a book?
What's the best method for world-building?
What should I do if I'm not sure what to use for a book's plot?
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Arielle Mabitazan's profile photo
13 comments
 
1) there is no right way/ wrong way to start a book as long as, and I repeat, as long as the start of your book is somehow connected to the plot to your middle. For example, if you start of by just a few lines of describing a scenery then cut it of there. I have no qualms with that. But I would expect that by the next few chapters the main characters would somehow relate to that scenery. Another example is getting a phrase from another source like the bible or any philosophy book, but the thing about that is you have to stick with that phrase the whole series which in some cases is a bit annoying unless you really believe in it.

2) if you're writing a book about world building then start off from what you see from the news then compare it from what you see from outside your house.

3)hmm, take a break? Walk. Or read some other resources. Find your inspiration again. 
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Ok, I have a question. So in the middle of a sencteve if you say I have the contraction is I've. Why is the I capitalized?
And the conrtraction for it is is it's. Do you capitalize the I in It's or leave it lower case?
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Can I vent a little bit about CreateSpace?

Backstory: I moved my paperbacks to KDP a few weeks ago, after tossing the idea back and forth for a while to begin with. A little over a week ago, I tried to lower the price of one of my paperbacks to coincide with a Kindle Countdown Deal, only the price on the Amazon page never changed, even though the lower price was showing live on my KDP dashboard. I submitted the price change about 3 times within a week, and nothing, including again today.

So now, that and the fact that KDP still has no projected date (that I can tell) for expanded distribution, led me to decide to move my paperbacks, or at least a couple of them, back to CreateSpace until KDP works out its kinks and/or forces us to move all books. Then I ran into an error, stating that the ISBN was already in use, and therefore would not let me save it back onto CS.

Granted, after some thought, I'm not sure if this is because I'm still waiting for the option for the paperback "edit details/content/pricing" to become available again so that I can Unpublish the paperback from KDP, at which time perhaps the ISBN would no longer be "in use"?? Meanwhile, my countdown deal is now, of course, ended, so the price change is pointless now anyway.

It's been frustrating, to say the least, but to make matters even worse, I made the mistake of posting a question in the CS "Community" asking how to move paperbacks back to CS without having to generate a new ISBN, and nearly every response I've gotten there has been exceptionally rude. Comments like "Hey, Michelle (lipmag) -- in another thread you stated what you were tired of. Know what I'm tired of? Newbies with an attitude, such as Nicolette here."
This coming from Lorem_Ipsum, member since Feb 2015, while I've been a member since Apr 2013??

https://forums.createspace.com/en/community/message/381692#381692

Ok, I'm done ranting now. But if any of you know if this is actually a thing, where you can't use CreateSpace generated ISBN's on CreateSpace itself... Or that CS will be shutting down completely so that all paperbacks will have to go through KDP... Or even when KDP will open up expanded distribution on paperbacks, please feel free to share that info. (Preferably in a way that doesn't make a person with a Masters degree feel like an idiot.)

I should just go with Ingram Spark for paperback and avoid the whole trouble.
A few weeks ago, I went ahead and took the leap to move my paperback books from CreateSpace over to KDP. Since then, I've had issues with my Amazon listing reflecting price changes, and I am also not happy with the limited distribution channel, as KDP does not offer any distribution other than the ...
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Nicole R. Locker's profile photoCynthia B Ainsworthe's profile photo
20 comments
 
+Nicole R. Locker On another thread here in this group, I read that an ISBN from Bowker can be used for the same book at CS and IS. Since CS buys ISBNs from Bowker in lots of 1000, I would think that an ISBN for a book would be valid for any distributor.

CS customer service phone number is 1-866-362-8262. I hope that helps. I haven't had a chance to call them and get the scoop as to if CS will continue.
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My experience with gatekeepers was that they were more interested in a book's marketability than its quality.

Yes, there are some poor quality self-published books that are guilty of the things Gough is claiming, but I know there are self-published writers in this group whose work is vastly different from what she describes, writers who have put in the hard work of learning their craft, and who were locked out of trad publishing despite what Brad Thor says: "If you’re a good writer and have a great book you should be able to get a publishing contract.” And there are others who have rejected trad publishing simply because that business model doesn't make sense for them.

I get the feeling Gough just hasn't had the pleasure of reading the right self-pubbed books.

As a published author, people often ask me why I don't self-publish. "Surely you'd make more money if you got to keep most of the profits rather than the...
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Vanessa MacLellan's profile photoTravis Bird's profile photo
26 comments
 
Snobbery, pure and simple. Who were the 'gatekeepers' who 'published' Shakespeare?
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2 years ago, novellas became popular in the self-publishing sphere, real contenders with novel-length products. 18 months ago, Amazon embraced the shorter form by offering their Kindle Serials program. 6 months ago, James Patterson brought novellas into the main traditional publishing sphere in a big way with his Bookshots.

I predict that shorter fiction will only increase in popularity over the next 18-24 months.

It'd be great for self-publishers if it did. Editors could parse many more new works by unpublished (traditional) authors much faster, for those concerned with getting traditionally published.
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Ryan M. Danks's profile photo
13 comments
 
+Mike Reeves-McMillan, I think the same could be said for novels, or any fiction length, for that matter. I've read some novels that I thought could have been completed in 100,000 less words and been more compelling, and some novels that should have had another 20,000 words to give a proper ending.
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Do you consider writers artists?


My answer:
Yes, writers draw the picture in your imagination. It will change and be improved. Writers will play around until their work is just right. Also, instead of an art museum their work is in a library or bookstore.
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Tzvi Krasner's profile photo
 
Or on a screen. I'm writing like five different series that are all being produced by my own company. One live action, three animated and a manga-anime epic.
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Readers start thinking when thinkers start writing.
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Mike Anyayahan's profile photo
3 comments
 
Thanks +Dave Hannis Yes, it is infinite as there is no limit to what our mind can do. :-)
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In recent days, I've spent a good half of my waking hours writing, and while I've not burned out as of yet, I fear that in a few days, I might lack the drive to even open Word.
In my foresight, I decided that in a long period of writing, it must be important to have breaks interspersed to keep myself "fresh."
Therefore, I ask anybody who's come to similar conclusions when writing for hours: How long do you write before taking a break, and how long might that break be?
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Evelyn Chartres's profile photo
6 comments
 
I write when there is time for as long as I can. Sometimes I will sacrifice sleep or something planned but rarely. Work and a child go a long way to enforcing some restrictions!
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Jon Gritton

General  - 
 
Who said an overly complex plot is a bad thing?
 
"Genre Soup," or, "[Editor], when you said the author of the series you just bought was a model, I didn't think you meant a Markov model."

h/t +Jaym Gates and KC Cole.
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Steve Turnbull's profile photoCynthia B Ainsworthe's profile photo
10 comments
 
+Steve Turnbull You are so correct on that one. Romance readers demand a happy ending. I have no idea how long this 'rule' has been in place. I have killed off characters, but never the two main characters of the plot---to do so would be shooting my romance writing career in the foot.
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Beta readers. Should I enlist the help of beta readers as I write and release a chapter to them right when I finish, or should I finish the entire draft and then send out chapters one by one? (I am on my second draft.)
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Allison Wright's profile photoMark David's profile photo
6 comments
 
You will frustrate them a chapter at a time. Have a close alpha-reader to share your rough drafts with, just for sparring. Then keeping working in it until you can manage the best fourth draft you can - then get a beta-reader to tell you why need a fifth.
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I have been writing for a little while. And I was wondering how do you know when you are done editing something you have wrote? 
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Louis Doggett's profile photo
5 comments
 
+Monica Woodward Many writers have that problem. Some say they let their inner critic come out and play too often. Sometimes you just have to grit your teeth and send it out or show it off as the case might be.
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I am in the process of getting my children's picture book "ABC Questions " into schools. They would be purchasing the books from me. Is there an industry discount I should provide the schools?


Christinecruzbooks.com
"Can I Always Come Back Home?" is a delightful children's book, written by Author Christine Cruz, that will help children cope with separation anxiety.
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Christine Cruz's profile photo
3 comments
 
Thank you both
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Hi Everyone. I have a question-
Does anyone have any experience writing "episodes"? My "little" brother is moving away for a job (for an undetermined amount of time). He and I are close, so this will be hard for us. We both enjoy storys. (Books, tv, movies, etc.) So I was thinking that I might try to write episodes of a story to send to him- But I have no experience with writing something like that. So if anyone has any tips or hints or tricks. Or knows of a blog or webpage that would help me I would greatly appreciate it! Thanks in advance!
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Evelyn Chartres's profile photo
3 comments
 
+JB Hall episodes on television are becoming less and less standalone. Instead they rely on an unifying thread to the story much as you define.

I write the same way, write up standalone chapters and bind them together. Allows me to get to know my characters and watch them grow.
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Irene Grey

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So what writing websites do you guys use? Wattpad is probably the most common, but I always felt like I couldn't get enough reads on that site - like my writing just got lost in the sea of Wattpad-iness. :{P

I currently use a site called Figment, and I love it because it has a great community and you can get soooo many reads (and follows :P). Do any of you guys use it? (If any one does use it or ends up joining, send me the link to your profile and I'll follow you!)
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Mike Corey

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Isn't it great when the tangle of ideas you start with suddenly coalesce into a story you can work with?

It's almost intoxicating.

If it doesn't happen to me I don't have a good story.

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Mark David's profile photoZander Putnel's profile photo
12 comments
 
i definitely know the feeling.
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Chris Mason

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Hi, As I am a fellow author I was just curious to hear what marketing techniques worked for you.
I look forward to hearing from you.
Chris Mason
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Nathan Lowell's profile photo
2 comments
 
The reason for not posting the exact same post on a dozen or more communities is that G+ considers them spam. Once they're placed in the lint trap, it takes a moderator to approve them. Somebody like me has to determine whether or not they'll be allowed in the community. It's a matter of effectiveness rather than a judgement on you.

So some more concrete suggestions...

Fill out your G+ profile. Tell us a story about who you are. Add links to where your books are for sale. Put up a link to your website so we can find out more about you and your work.

Do you have a twitter account? Might put a link to that up as well.

A Facebook profile? Another good choice.

Start collecting email addresses on your website. I like MailChimp.

Some less concrete advice...

Consider what you mean by "worked" and "marketing." For me, marketing is what I did before I decided to get into writing. It's how I decided what I wanted to spend my time and energy writing, where I would publish it, and how I could promote it. I determined what worked with a very naive and simple rubric:
"Did I have fun?"
Yes -> Do more.
No -> Not so much

Later, once I became a full time author, I had to amend that to include "What earns well?" I still have to have fun, but I also have an obligation to the family to focus a bit on the business end.

I found that social media offers the best opportunity for interacting with my audience at a reasonable cost. I found that advertising and chain-promotions can produce sales but is spotty when it comes to return-on-investment. It also takes a lot of effort away from the creation of new works.

Beyond that, some markets are more difficult to crack than others. Markets that are mostly digital offer the best returns. Childrens books, MG, YA - those markets are still mostly paper and depend on an adult finding the book in a bookstore and buying it for a kid. Some people have found success by teaming up with home schoolers if the content seems appropriate.

There are other techniques that non-fiction authors can use that involve creating credible bona fides in a subject matter area. Typically, those involve blogging, speaking, and working to provide proof that you know what you're talking about. They're not any easier than fiction, just different.

JMO. YMMV.
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