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"In the acrolect of the time and place, this symbol set was preferred."

I don't understand "acrolect".  Is there an acrolect of a time and place or does this just mean the common language?
 
 
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Daniel Price's profile photoIsabel Storey's profile photo
3 comments
 
"William Stewart, in 1965, proposed that the terms acrolect and basilect be the sociolinguistic labels for the upper and lower boundaries respectively of a post-creole speech continuum.[1] In the early 1970s Derek Bickerton popularized these terms (as well as mesolect for intermediate points in the continuum) to refer to the phenomenon of code-switching used by some users of creole languages who also have some fluency in the standard language upon which the contact language is based. University of Chicago linguist Salikoko Mufwene explains the phenomenon of creole languages as "basilectalization" away from a standard, often European, language among a mixed European and non-European population.[2] In certain speech communities, a continuum exists between speakers of a creole language and a related standard language. There are no discrete boundaries between the different varieties and the situation in which such a continuum exists involves considerable social stratification." Wiki
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Writing is like masturbation, an exquisitely pleasurable private activity, compelling because it’s so pleasurable. But as my long-ago psychotherapist said about masturbation, you don’t meet any interesting people that way. Writers want to be read. We want intercourse—connections. In fact, we’re incredibly promiscuous. We want to be read by the whole world. Although some of us would settle for intimacy, for 500 readers, a thousand. But we are promiscuous, because we want strangers to read us. --from my remarks to the Annapolis Chapter, Maryland Writers Association
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Isabel Storey's profile photoVictor Powell's profile photo
2 comments
 
Carrying that analogy over to being paid for it?
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Narayan Liu

General  - 
 
Hi everyone,

I think I know the answer to what I'm about to ask but, I'd rather ask it anyway just to be certain.

I want to quote an ancient Egyptian poem in my book, but since my book is in English and not ancient egyptian, I was wondering if I would run into any problems in regards to creative rights if I were to just copy a close translation.
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Narayan Liu's profile photoStephanie Cain's profile photo
3 comments
 
Unless you find a translation that is in the public domain. I believe that would be before 1923 or thereabouts in the U.S.

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I noticed today that Amazon is offering the first 4 books in one of my series as a bundle, ignoring the last 2 books in that series. I wonder what rationale they're using... No skin off my nose, since the bundle price equals the sum of the books. But since I didn't ask for it... well, you know.

It shows on the page for DEAD BEEF if anyone wants to see what I mean.
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Eduardo Suastegui's profile photo
4 comments
 
Hmm. Yup. Like +Steve Turnbull saw for his, my other series doesn't show the bundling. Might be worth a follow up support query.
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Wilf Nelson

General  - 
 
Need some help.

I have a story I've been writing about humanitarians in the future who work for a company that send people back in time. They go to the worst times in history and offer medical help to civilians, ensure that chance isn't the only reason VIPs get out of dangerous places in time, and protect valuable artefacts either by getting them some place safe or just taking them out of the time so people in the future had the paintings lost on the Titanic, had the scrolls from the library of Alexandria.

I wanted to write a story where scientific advancements and a multi billionaire dollar company did something altruistic. 

I have been severely struggling with the plot. The plot concerns a veteran going back to the Black Death, it is seen as extremely dangerous not only given how much the bubonic plague wiped out a third of the planet's population but also people get dangerous in those situations. The company, called Hent's Altruistic Ventures, agree to his choice of placements but they make him go back with a rookie. The reason is his blackbox was recovered saying he did go into his mission with a rookie and something happened; management won't tell him what for fear of it changing his own reactions.

He agrees knowing there is a very good chance the mission will go badly. It does but he finds out the rookie screws up by letting someone have access to their medication which protects them from the plague, in essence saving someone who should have died. This in turns gives away their cover and well human beings in bad situations around the unknown is never going to go well.

The problem comes from two big issues.

1. the story gets very formulaic just as the work would be. go to a town/village, set up a clinic and treat people with painkillers to they heal or die as time says they would. the concept is interesting but I don't want to just drop anvils from on high for the sake of cheap thrills.
2. the story's ending is enormously depressing. A witch hunt that results in both characters dying of exhaustion, exposure to the elements and likely disease is too depressing for even me to write and I'm the person who wrote a story about a man being arrested persecuted and used as a martyr for a cause against his will.

any ideas? I love the concept but I think i lack the skill to write it
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Wilf Nelson's profile photo
21 comments
 
+Joel Reid in the story the slight conspiracy theory I play with is that Hents steal. They are enormously, hilariously wealthy. Patrick is paid millions and millions for his services largely attributable to danger pay but he is only in his own timeline for a few months at a time. Hents take care of their employees but they obviously don't charge a fee for their services. It doesn't add up.

The two theories that bounce around the book are either that lots of those priceless artefacts they bring back they actually sell for enormous profit.
Or they just manipulate stocks and bonds in their favour and buy and sell at the appropriate times according to what the timeline would say is most profitable, the back to the future two plan sort of.

I honestly haven't decided but this is a very scientific book in that they aren't going back to a time when we believed in witches and ghouls like we believe in rain and gravity now and go back to out they were real all along. It would be a bit silly in my opinion and the bubonic plague makes a nice enemy. It isn't evil, it is just everywhere, it is the way the world is.
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OK, as usual, I need some schooling. I'm hoping someone can help me decipher why I keep getting mentioned in tweets linking to paper.li (see below for example). Is it just a matter of someone stitching together a much of tweets around a theme, and if my tweet lands in the mush, I get mentioned? For example, I recently tweeted about a review I did +Brooke Johnson's BRASS GIANT, which happens to fit the Steampunk genre, and presto, here I am...

I also landed in a paper.li tweet/link by +Eoghann Irving, so maybe he can school me (us?) a little on this.
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Eduardo Suastegui's profile photoElisabeth Zguta's profile photo
12 comments
 
when someone tags me to their paper I RT because we want to spread the word on various issues and the posts that are all linked to the same type tags It's another way to get the word out about -  #writingtips    #technology  etc.
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Is it possible to write other character's thoughts on something in third person limited, or would that consider to be head-hopping? 
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Sheldon Williams's profile photoDaniel Price's profile photo
5 comments
 
+Sheldon Williams - You should be italicising every character's internal dialogue. Keep it consistent, not just for other characters.
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Brandy Moss

General  - 
 
I have a question for those of you who use smashwords. I can check sales of paperback & kindle on Amazon, and direct sales from Smashwords, but how do I tell if people are buying from the other places smashwords distributes to? Apple? Barnes & Noble? I have no clue if I've ever sold anything through them. If so, I've certainly never received a penny for it.
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Steve Turnbull's profile photoLouis Doggett's profile photoMary S. Sentoza's profile photo
7 comments
 
Just saw this. But Dave seems to have answered it about the way I would of.


They have recorded one sell on iTunes, Kobe and some place else I don't recall hearing about. 
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Puzzle me this...

So with one week to go until my local launch party for Brotherhood of Delinquents, I've decided that the theme of the event will be puzzles. After all, the book is an homage to adventure stories with puzzles and secrets, so a puzzelicious party seems the perfect choice.

Which leaves me puzzling over what kinds of clever conundra to throw at my party guests. And you, my Plus-buddies, seem the perfect audience to help me brainstorm this. Attendees will be teens and up.

What would you do to both perplex and entertain?
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Jefferson Smith's profile photoRoland Boykin's profile photo
16 comments
 
I think as long as the kids have a chance to participate, they will enjoy whatever you come up with. Good luck!
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DL Keur

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You know the maxim, right? Start with something everyone will agree with, then lead them along until, gradually, they come to the conclusion you desire.

But.

It doesn't work on me. Never has. I just don't "bite."

So, knowing that there are a bunch of writers a lot like me upon whom that particular formula utterly fails, I wonder how many of you have tried the opposite, namely, starting with something with which most people take exception, then continuing by riling that resistance to bring them further and further into your book?
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Eduardo Suastegui's profile photoDL Keur's profile photo
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DL Keur
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I find her quite real and I like her for all her issues.
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Hi everyone.  I would like some feedback on a "cover" I've created for a post-apocalyptic story that I finished writing last week.  The story examines the life of Golding's main character Ralph, fifteen years after he is rescued from the island in Lord of the Flies.  So, does this image catch the eye?  Is it too busy? 


Kenneth D. Reimer


Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kenneth.d.reimer
Writeon Short Story Page:
https://writeon.amazon.com/search?headerQuery=kenneth+d+reimer&ref_=ign_h_tn_sr
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Alun M's profile photoKenneth D. Reimer's profile photo
7 comments
 
+Alun M I rather like your idea regarding combining the two motifs into one cover.  The predominate image of a ruined cityscape would reflect the post-apoc setting, and then a second, subtle (perhaps superimposed) element would hint at the Flies connection.  Hm, thanks for this suggestion.   
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Jason Hein

General  - 
 
Alright, one last run (hopefully) on the review process for my cover. Let me know what you all think please and thank you! 
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Bruce Burns's profile photoLouis Doggett's profile photo
6 comments
 
I like it. I can't say how well it fits into the story line but it's got intriguing components.

And nice colors. 
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Does anyone actively participate in Twitter chats? I love them and am always looking for more to join.

And in case you haven't participated in one and would like to (or you are a pro at them) I've created some tips! 
Twitter chats are amazing opportunities for learning and networking. I have some tips for Twitter chats to get you started.
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Eduardo Suastegui's profile photoCody Sisco's profile photoEmma Leya's profile photo
3 comments
 
Porter Anderson runs a twitter chat called #FutureChat. I think it takes place once a week. Lots of informed perspectives on the current and future states of the book publishing business (if you can follow the chat stream).
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I have been writing my story on Wattpad, but I read someones post about Literrater and decided to check it out.  It looks very friendly there and I already have a few followers.  My problem is I have no idea how or if I can transfer my first chapter to Literrater.  I have been trying with no luck.  Any ideas would be appreciated.  Thanks!
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Robert McLemore's profile photo
 
Doesn't wattpad retain usage rights to posted works for six months? I think that's why i haven't used it as a platform.
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Haven't done much here but I thought this could go here:

Speaking about writing--not that anyone was at the moment,

I just saw something on another community that jogged my memory.

Years ago--like five to seven--I was on a writing board on AOL. We tried to do exercises to improve our writing. One was writing from the evil twin's POV.  

Mine was not that the Evil twin came along and did something but that the good twin came along and did something while imitating the evil one. 

Maybe with what I know about writing now I will redo that one. 
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Michael Jones's profile photoLouis Doggett's profile photo
2 comments
 
+Michael Jones One reason I mentioned it. :)
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Scrivener Formatting

Anyone know how to make Scrivener behave like Google Docs in respect to changing to normal format when you hit enter after header text?

Working in Drive files is nice because I only have to hit the button to choose title/heading once, and when I hit enter it switches back to normal formatting so I can type. Scrivener, by default, is not that smart, and I've been searching for the last hour for how to make it work and I can't figure it out.
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Elisabeth Zguta's profile photoRyan M. Danks's profile photosteve miller's profile photo
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+Elisabeth Zguta, I've got that. What I'm trying to do is have it work like Pages or Google Docs, where you don't have to change the preset after hitting return to leave a heading and go into regular typing again. Those programs assume that if you hit return after typing a header, then you probably want to write the text that belongs under the header, and so automatically switches you to the body/normal preset.
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I'm liking the possibilities of how I can use G+ collections to promote my brand(s)--my two series, in my case, though you can get more granular, if you want, with a book, for instance. As far as I can tell, if I make the collection public, posting to it is no different than posting to my public stream... with the added benefit that the collection name appears as a link at the top of the page. A reader can click on it and access related posts, which let's them find what I've posted for that topic a heck of a lot easier than before. 
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Brittany Constable's profile photoMLBanner's profile photo
13 comments
 
Thanks +Karen Conlin. I see that now. Smart on Google's part to automatically include your followers.
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What type of poetry do you like to read?
31 votes  -  votes visible to Public
Romance
0%
Erotic
6%
Humorous
29%
Self-Check
3%
Thoughtful
61%
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Aryan Gupta's profile photoAaron Blakeley's profile photo
7 comments
 
I also like surreal poetry
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Does anyone have a general idea of how long a synopsis should be, and how to write one? 
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Brittany Constable's profile photoSheldon Williams's profile photo
4 comments
 
+Brittany Constable Sweet, okay. Now I know what to do. Thank you. 
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Judy Leslie

General  - 
 
I saw this video and thought I would share it.  I am not pushing this guy's book.  However I thought what he had to say in this interview was helpful about the process of writing.  Hope you take time to watch it.  Thanks.
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Cynthia B Ainsworthe's profile photoElisabeth Zguta's profile photoWord Sherbert's profile photo
2 comments
 
Great advice - follow your intuition instead of chasing elusive results. Thanks for sharing this +Judy Leslie 
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