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Climate change is no joke but you can use the fun and interactive games in this book to help people of all ages imagine how to think creatively and constructively about tackling this global challenge. http://www.chelseagreen.com/the-climate-change-playbook

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The first review of my next picture book is in, and it's good!

The book encourages keen observation....an imporatmat habit when trying to understand and navigate complex systems. 

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Christiane Dorion and I will be on for a live streaming hour exploring children as systems thinkers. November 18th. Come join us! 

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How do we educate a generation of circular economy natives?  Come join the discussion today at noon EST -- Disruptive Innovation Festival. We'll be using RedPen to collect suggestions, comments, ideas.    https://www.thinkdif.co/emf-stage/why-we-should-all-be-suspect-of-bullet-points

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Terrific new learning opportunity:
Fritjof Capra will offer "Capra Course", an online course of 12 lectures,  in early 2016. The course is based on his book “The Systems View of Life,” coauthored with Pier Luigi Luisi and published by Cambridge University Press. You can sign up via the link below.  See you there! 

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If you're interested in children's literature that helps children "see and understand systems", check out Sheri Marlin's Literature Connects blog.  http://tinyurl.com/qe38opt

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The Next Generation Science Standards outline a progression of systems-related cross-cutting concepts through grades bands.  These concepts include:  patterns, cause and effect, systems and systems models, stability and change, among others.  For example, here is the standard for  "Systems and systems models" (K-2): "Objects and organisms can be described in terms of their parts. Systems in the natural and designed world have parts that work together."

If you're teaching in a K-2 classroom, check out the "Wind as a Weather System" in the attached teacher/parent guide, created for my new picture book, 'WHEN THE WIND BLOWS". 

I'm eager to hear your thoughts.

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My brother, Marion Brady (he's the education notable) and I have developed a one-year general education course for middle school and up that focuses entirely on systems, CONNECTIONS---INVESTIGATING REALITY Reality. It is available at no cost from www.marionbrady.com. There's also a free American history course that uses the same system-investigation framework.

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The "Becoming Systems Literate" webinar officially launched the PBS Learning Media systems literacy collection.  if you missed it, you can watch the recording here.

My kids are now older, but when they were in grade school, my observation was: a lack of time or tolerance for their unbounded questions. This comment is not a criticism of the teachers, but rather a comment about the institution and culture of school learning.

We have a curriculum to get through and a scheduled time to do it in. More recently, the time allowed is metered by the pace of testing. Of course kids ask questions in class, but they quickly learn that clarifying questions (about material on the test) are ok, while imaginative "what if" questions are not as readily supported.

Unanticipated, imaginative questions can derail a class for a significant amount of time. Perhaps the answer is not part of the curriculum. Perhaps the answer is unknown by the teacher, just generally not known, or ambiguous (best result).

So, I would suggest scheduling free-thinking time (perhaps an after school activity as it was in our house) where the subject is guided, but goes where the curiosity goes. Students could be guided to answer their own questions through "research". This is when "system tools" become most valuable (when the problem becomes non-linear with feedbacks and delays). In that moment, teachers could use system thinking tools to guide the student's discovery.
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