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These are Litt'l Bites Tomatoes. I call this a tomato bush, or tree. It's been producing for months and just when I thought it showed signs of slowing down and petering out (it is a determinate) and I had plans to use the pot, it began flowering in earnest. I've had to tie and stake it. For the size of the pot there are too many plants but that's me -- I tend to go overboard.
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2015-08-22
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A trellis with some Persian Cukes starting to climb and another trellis (in the rectangular white pot) with newly planted Tom Thumb mini peas.
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2015-08-22
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I prefer growing edibles but was curious to try Garden Party Miniature Rose seeds. I'd never started roses from seed before. Indeed they were mini (about 1/4" in bud)!They were a blend of pink shades which looked really cute when tight in the bud. When in full bloom they were splayed with petals which were slightly fragrant and bloomed and died within a day or two!
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2015-08-22
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My particular set up consists of  4 four FT T5 full spectrum lights, 2 two FT T5 full spectrum and 6 four FT T8 full spectrum lights affixed to some metal racking (ugly, utilitarian, gunmetal grey, but it works!).

Placement of the light above the plant is important, so your choice of shelving should be adjustable to accommodate your plants as they grow. T5 lights are cool so will not burn the tops of your plants when in close proximity. They should be no further than 6 inches away from your plant. T8 lights are a bit warmer but I still use the 6 inch maximum distance. The closer they are to the top of the plants, the more the plants will benefit from the light energy. Too far away and the plants become leggy and the light is rendered virtually useless.

My lights are on a timer and are run for 13 hours a day. I’ve seen recommendations of as much as 18 hours but this amount of time has worked consistently well for the variety of items I’ve grown.

I purchased trays from Lee Valley which are sold for use with growing tables. They are ideally sized for this particular shelving. My grow area is located off to the side of my laundry area in the basement. If I had my way, it would take up the entire basement, but I tend to go overboard -- don’t be tempted to do so --  start out small with something manageable and go from there. 

Your grow light garden will be so easy to maintain. There are no weeds to pull, but if you see some old or rotting vegetation, remove it right away so as to not attract pests (which in my experience have been minimal and limited to little pesky little fleas which follow you in from outside when the door is open). 

Keep your plants well hydrated, fertilize (I use fertilizer for cucumber, peppers, strawberries tomatoes only, not herbs or greens) on schedule, use a fan for air circulation and don’t over crowd your plants. 

Get some grow light and have some indoor garden fun. I absolutely love it!

+Karen Ashcroft thanks for starting this group. I have a LOT to learn since I'm among those who used grow lights strictly for seed starting. Here in the north I know I'll find the entire grow light garden process will cheer me during the long winter. Are there any supplies, general items I should purchase? I usually only discover I need something when it's too late! 
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