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Working with seitan and other plant proteins is part of SNC's certificate level program. Once you get the hang of it, there are so many possibilities - in texture, flavor and application! This is one a student made a while back - seitan made from scratch, then steeped in spices and braised in a delicious liquid of beer, lime juice, agave, water and tamari. The result was amazing!
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Are you interested in knowing more about Intuitive Cooking? Take a look at this introductory video http://vimeo.com/74793414 and visit our website www.naturalcookery.com

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What's your brunch inspiration today? What's in my cupboard this morning? Loving the infinite possibilities presented by the Language of Intuitive Cooking...Hmmm blueberry buckwheat pancakes might be in order in this house...
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Pressed/wilted salads are a wonderful addition to many meal compositions... they provide crunch, freshness and great colours to a plate. This one is a lovely accompaniment for any number of mains, and using the SNC method for a pressed/wilted salad it's easy to whip up many creative varieties of this type of dish in just a few minutes. For those of you who aren't following recipe sketches yet, here's an approximate recipe for you (but feel free to play, taste, get creative and change as you like!):

1/2 cup thinly shredded purple cabbage
1/3 cup thinly sliced cucumber
1/3 cup thinly julienned celery
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
1/2-1 tsp sea salt
few squeezes lime juice
1/8 cup raw pumpkin seeds

1) Get your veggies ready, and layer them one on top of the other

2) Sprinkle the salt over top, and gently work it in so it gets all over the vegetables (do this until you start to see pockets of water forming, but don’t overwork)

3) Press the salad together gently with both hands, until vegetables start to wilt

4) Squeeze lime juice over top of salad and toss lightly

5) Put into serving bowl and garnish with pumpkin seeds.
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Had a great online class last night with Sandy McDonnell. Her first recipe sketch for butternut soup was well done and her knife skills practice spot on! This system works!
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2014-11-05
4 Photos - View album

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You can't underestimate the importance of good, sharp knives in your kitchen - they are safer, and support beautiful food cuts. Learning how to sharpen knives properly is a part of the SNC certificate program - a skill you will use for the rest of your cooking life. This is a neat infographic from localroot.com on sharpening tips, and ways to store your knives to keep them sharp.

What works for you in keeping your knives nice and sharp?
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Braising is one of my favorite methods to use with tempeh...it infuses flavor and transforms this bland plant protein into something spectacular! At SNC we learn the method of braising, which can then be applied to any form of plant protein, vegetable or bean. Once you know the method, the possibilities are endless! This is the power of the language of natural cookery. The recipe sketch for this tempeh, which was served on a bed of greens and sprouts with roasted beets goes like this: 

 Braised Tempeh: 
 Salt: Tamari
 Oil: Toasted Sesame
 Herb/Spice: Chipotle
 Strong Cooking Liquid: Lime Juice, Agave, Beer
 Mild Cooking Liquid: Water

 For those who are not familiar with the language of natural cookery, but want to make the dish, here's how you do it:

 1) Cut the tempeh into thin triangles, and seal (sauté) them in oil on both sides
 2) In the meantime make up your braising liquid by combining the salt, oil, h/s and cooking liquids in the following ratios: 1 part liquid salt: 1/2 part lime juice: 1/2 part agave: 1 part beer: 1 part water: chipotle to taste (you'll have to think about how much liquid you want to end up with to figure out the starting amount of salt; for 1 cake of tempeh it's probably about 1/8 cup)
 3) When the tempeh has finished sealing, add the braising liquid that you have made, and after about 1/2 of it has been absorbed, flip the tempeh and cook the other side (*note, you should be using a pan that's big enough to fit all the tempeh in one layer - i.e. there should be no overlapping). 
 4) Serve hot!

 *The tempeh has a strong flavor, so it's nice served on a salad. If you have questions, or other serving suggestions, please share them here!
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A few photos from the recent studio session in Ashland, Oregon for Certificate Students - Levels one and two. We had a blast (and the food was pretty good too)! :)
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2014-10-29
4 Photos - View album
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