Hey guys! Please don't forget the summer reading...you will have some time when school starts but the more you can read and post now the better- author Clive Thompson is raring to go...really wants to do a Google Hangout with us soon

Clive Thompson Article Response: 
I thought it was interesting how in today's society we write more than previous generations. Having all this social media such as Facebook, blogs and emails makes us try to connect with the world through an audience. The funny thing is that these viewers make us write better - usually. For example, right now I am writing on a discussion page on our TOK G+ community, and yes I am double checking my grammar and punctuation!  Just the fact that someone might read my comment makes me want to impress them or at least not offend them in a way. Even though we write more for an audience, doesn't mean that the content is quality. 

Clive Thompson Article Response:
Although I agree with the majority of the article, the part which spoke to me the most was the bit about the children performing better when they were forced to perform. I feel I can relate to this statement, for I have often stated that I learn quite a bit through tutoring my peers. It is something about having to put to the information in your own words, as well as having enough confidence to tell the person you are helping which really helps me remember the information I teach. Furthermore, in this situation, one needs to find a way to communicate the information in rather simple terms, in order to ensure the person one is helping is not just hearing new words and terms they do not even know. Although this thought has been in my mind, I have never read it written so concisely and well before.

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Clive Thompson wrote me regarding his article here: 
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Please read this new Wired Magazine article by Clive Thompson (he is willing to chat with us on Twitter) and write a reflective comment. What did you find most intriguing? What sorts of things are applicable to our studies of the Nature of Knowledge? What questions would you ask? (respond by Oct. 11)
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