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Paul O'Neill
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Upcoming Professional Learning  - 
 
Kinesthetic Classroom Workshop - Michael Kuczala - October 22-23 at ASIJ .

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Dana Melvin

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Some Companies Are Banning Email and Getting More Done http://flip.it/YB.Rj
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Paul O'Neill
owner

Upcoming Professional Learning  - 
 
Designing Spaces For Learning - One course from Masters program. Facilitated by Ewan McIntosh. Starting in July 2016
A guide for new and currently enrolled students to the courses and subjects offered by Charles Sturt University
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Ed Ladd
 
Would be a great course as we begin thinking about campus master plan in the future.
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Tracey Reed

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This insightful post resonated with me given the significant turnover of faculty our community is experiencing. Some great fodder for helping each other through transitions whether we are new, staying or departing.
It’s not yet Christmas . . . and already I’m thinking about June. There is a reason for that. Where I live people come and go . . . a lot. That’s the part that they don’t p…
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Dana Melvin's profile photo
 
Haha! Those metrics are on point. Thanks for this. Lots of good reality checks embedded no matter what your mindset.
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Dana Melvin

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Lift off. Rocking the metaphor!
The remarks of Donovan Livingston, Ed.M.'16, student speaker at HGSE's 2016 Convocation exercises.
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I found his poem so inspiring as an educator..."Together, we can inspire galaxies of greatness For generations to come."
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Vera Adams

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The Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Ministry has decided to make computer programming a compulsory subject at primary schools in fiscal 2020, followed by middle schools in fiscal 2021 and high schools in fiscal 2022.
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Paul O'Neill
owner

Upcoming Professional Learning  - 
 
Free Webinar - NGSS Science Using Phenomena to Engage Students.
June 7 - these are usually recorded so if you register you can access the archive rather than attending the live webinar.

https://www.rubicon.com/offerings/professional-development/events/spark-ngss-using-phenomena-engage-students/?utm_source=link_more%20info&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2016_Spring_pandasJL
OFFERINGS > PD > Webinars Spark: NGSS-Using Phenomena to Engage Students Join us for a live Spark webinar as we sit down with TJ...
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Naoko Machidori

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"Confidence" is not just feeling, but rather processed calculation.
"Our brain uses statistics to calculate confidence, making decisions"
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Megan Ortwein

Professional Learning Reflections  - 
 
I had the privilege of attending NCTM’s annual Math Conference this year, my first math conference ever. I was overwhelmed by the energy the presenters brought to their presentations and the collaboration amongst math teachers from around the world. Each educator there was highly motivated to learn new ways in how to enrich our classrooms to make each student learn to love math.
 
A hot icon and keynote speaker, Dan Meyers gave a wonderful presentation called “Strong Strategies for Student Engagement”. The biggest thing that I took away from this presentation was that 1.) Dan Meyers is my new math hero because he is extremely passionate about making math more rewarding for students by coming up with exciting and interesting strategies, but most importantly 2.)  How math textbooks can be daunting to students and how we can simply tweak the problems to create more intriguing questions. This can help spark student interest thus leading to more student engagement. Often textbooks ask questions that lend no creativity for students to explore, which, in turn lowers the levels of interest. If we can take a textbook problem and take away the instructions, delete numbers or some given information, then you can ask students questions that the textbook wouldn’t have originally allowed. By asking more general questions about the new problem, each student may interpret the questions differently motivating them to find a way to get an answer to the general questions. When students come up with their own answers they are confident in the work they have done because they used their own creativity. Having them discuss with classmates about their own interpretations starts a rich discussion on a very general picture. Then by giving them the actual textbook question, they’re already intrigued in finding the answer.
 
I’m hoping to try problems like this out in the future. I think it will take time to get comfortable with this type of approach but I believe it will target a larger range of students.
 
Here is Dan Meyer’s blog post with his talk embedded. Please have a look if you’re interested:
http://blog.mrmeyer.com/2016/nctm16-beyond-relevance-real-world-stronger-strategies-for-student-engagement/
My talk from the 2016 NCTM Annual Meeting is online. I won’t claim that this is a good talk in absolute terms or that this talk will be good for your interests. I only know that, given my int…
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Paul O'Neill
owner

Upcoming Professional Learning  - 
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Paul O'Neill
owner

Upcoming Professional Learning  - 
 
EARCOS weekend workshops for 2016-17 
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Dana Melvin

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An interesting unraveling of some of the pitfalls of personalized learning. This line has some zing I can relate to: “The most compelling classrooms are ones in which learning goals are shared, and knowledge is fostered through social interactions.”
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Dana Melvin's profile photoMarc L'Heureux's profile photo
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“Students need to be guided down the path of their learning. Teachers should remain central to the activity of imparting knowledge to students.” Great teaching is still needed whether personalized or not.
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Jeff Leppard

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"It is literally neurobiologically impossible to build memories, engage complex thoughts, or make meaningful decisions without emotion. . . and evolution would not support wasting energy and oxygen thinking about things that don’t matter to us. Put succinctly, we only think about things we care about." Engagement 101
Understanding how deeply connected emotions are to learning can help reframe the conversation around what works in schools.
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Thanks for sharing Jeff. One of the integral parts of Social Thinking is teaching about emotions an helping students build an emotional vocabulary that students can then connect their budding social observations to.
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Carrie Bennett

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Some design thinking and a lot of patience:)
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Paul O'Neill
owner

Upcoming Professional Learning  - 
 
Here are some Knowledge Source Institute workshops for summer and for next school year.
George Couros; MAxine Driscoll; Carol Ann Tomlinson
http://www.ksipd.com/#!workshops/wje6m
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Min Wu

Professional Learning Reflections  - 
 
Attended the 15th Annual Chinese Articulation Workshop in Singapore American School, April 2016. A two- day workshop. A lot of information and new ideas were shared in the two days. Just as the old Chinese saying goes: “A single conversation across the table with a wise man/woman worth a month’s study of books.”
In those two days I attended a lot of activities include classroom observations, keynote and breakout sessions for participants to collaboratively delve into research on student-centered teaching practices, to exchange ideas, to develop a growth mindset around teaching pedagogy, and to share resources.

The keynote speaker Dr.Roy Lyster, illustrated how counterbalanced instruction serves to shift learners’ attention between language and content in ways that increase depth of processing. First, a proactive approach to counterbalanced instruction will be presented, as an instructional sequence comprised of noticing and awareness activities in conjunction with opportunities for guided and autonomous practice. Second, a reactive approach to counterbalanced instruction will be elaborated to highlight the potential of corrective feedback for supporting second language learning in contexts of contextualized practice. the research illustrate not only the feasibility of such interventions but also their positive effects on students’ second language development.

My favorite workshop was presented by Wendy Nagai, Primary Chinese teacher from Chinese International School in Hong Kong. She presented the products of their kids’ learning. They have been using readers’ and writers’ workshop strategies for 3 years, which made a big success. They collected students works, edited and published, celebrating the learning together. The language proficiency of their kids is amazing. Which gave me a deep impression.
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Kathleen Nickle

Professional Learning Reflections  - 
 
What is the right balance between reading books and reading digitally? How do we prepare our students for the shifts in literacy that our culture is going through?

I recently attended a conference called ReThinking Literacy in Singapore. Sessions focused on training students in media literacy and training strategic digital readers. In a world where more and more content is assessed online, traditional paper reading skills are no less important, but we can’t assume that students will transfer their paper-based reading and writing skills to the digital arena.

“Our task is to kaleidoscope the lesson and origami the content.” – Kristin Ziemke

One of the keynote presenters, Kristin Ziemke is an elementary teacher in a Chicago public school. She gave incredibly practical advice for implementing technology in the classroom to train students for literacy in a digital culture.

She explained the shifts in literacy from yesterday to today. Whereas in the past content was text-dependent and our writing centered around a 5 paragraph essay, students today sort through text, images and video to build knowledge and their ideas are synthesized through microwriting (texts, tweets, etc.)

She also talked about modeling for students how to “View to Learn.” When showing a video in class, walk students through these steps:
- View with a wide awake mind
- Think about what’s happening in the clip
- Annotate your thinking
- Pause the video so you can turn and talk with a partner
- “Reread” the video by watching it again

Have you seen a student take an hour choosing fonts for their keynote? When asking students to produce digital content, use a pyramid to remind them how to focus their time. The base of the pyramid, a vast proportion of their time, should be spent on building content. The next level is the creation of content, then less time on polishing content (fonts, pictures) before the final top of the period, presenting content.

Sharing and commenting on peers’ work online is a great learning resource. How can we train students to write great comments? What does a great comment look and sound like? See attached photo for Kristin’s suggestions for training kids in the building blocks of digital discussions.

I also attended many sessions by Lotta Larsen, Kansas State University, on Kindles in the classroom. At the conference, I presented on my action research study this year using immersive reading on the Kindle Fire tablet with English Language Learners and Learning Support students (tinyurl.com/rethinkingkindles). Not only does immersive reading regulate their speed, it increased comprehension and motivation to read. Please let me know if you’d like to hear more about using Kindles in the classroom or discuss shifts in digital literacy!

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I recently read Kristin Ziemke's book, Amplify. It was a great read - let me know if you'd like to read it! I'm happy to pass it along. I'd love to talk to you more about her session as well!
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Sarah Bernhardt

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"Imagine Educating a Generation of Solutionaries" - this article poses some guiding questions for schooling that reminded me quite a bit of our strategic objectives: "What issues in the world most concern you? What do you love to do? What skills and talents do you have that you could bring to bear on these issues?" Love the word "solutionaries" as well. :)
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I like their practical steps for teachers:
• model solution thinking and action
• connect traditional subject categories to relevant global issues
• discover each student’s interests and passions
• pay attention to each students’ talents, as well as their challenges
• personalize the curriculum to meet each student’s needs and aspirations
• let students know they matter.
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Roy Tomlinson

Professional Learning Reflections  - 
 
Attended the NCTM conference in San Francisco, April 2016.  A full-on 3 day packed schedule.  I have to say, Jo Boaler’s speech was epic.  Her research on the brain growth caused by effort and failure is astounding and should make anyone who teaches mathematics take notice.  I look forward to reading her book Mathematical Mindsets.  Her work with Middle School kids and having conversations was so fun to watch!  Also spent Friday evening at #Shadowcon16 , where 6 amazing rockstars of the math world (including Dan Meyer) gave 10 minute talks with “calls to action”.  My favorite was Kaneka Turner, whose talk on “Being Invited” was fantastic.  She talked about how we often exclude kids from math classes and these exclusions can have long term effects.  Her call to action was to “invite someone who wasn’t presently invited”.  Good stuff.  Have you ever felt “uninvited”?  We all have, I think.  Aside from the numerous workshops, vendor visits, and networking, I had a chance to meet our two new math teachers for next year, Misael and +Tricia.  Very excited they are on board for next year.  
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4 comments
 
Great to know. Her book is our summer PD read in the ES!
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