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Each kid at our divorce seminar gets a set of awesome coupons!  Included in the set will be 1.   Kids Night out coupon, 2. Kids Pass (where they can spend time with mom or dad) 3.  I need a hug coupon.  Visit us at kidsfirstparentssecond.org for more info!
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Guest: Australian Author, Karla Lee

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Keeping involved with your child may mean calling your ex and letting them know the house rules!  If you and your ex can stay on the same page you may reduce the risk of having your children manipulating one parent over the other! #mattsossi   #divorceattorneysanantoniotexas
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SPLIT: a film about #divorce for kids Nominated for “BEST DOCUMENTARY” at 2014 Taiwan International Children’s Film Festival #divorce  http://www.splitfilm.org
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For more articles like this....visit our San Antonio Family Law Community! www.sossilaw.com

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Think less about "forgiving" and more about "focusing" on the needs of your kids after your divorce.  Think Kids First, Parent's Second. www.sossilaw.com
Should you? Perhaps the more appropriate question might be, "Can you?" Yet each divorce is different. I have seen pain inflicted by one spouse upon the other during divorce and well beyond it for years after the divorce has concluded. 

If during your divorce your spouse created a definite and intentional pattern of alienating your children from you and there was almost nothing you could do about it because you couldn't prove it. If as a result of the anger and resentment of your ex-spouse you lose the lifetime you could have had with your children, how does a wronged spouse go about forgiving for that? 

How can you forget or forgive your ex-spouse when every day your children are not a part of your life and you have missed the entire lifetime of your children? It is an emptiness and a void for many people that can never be filled and that remains with a parent every day. 

Clearly there may be a burden lifted when a person can let the weight of the past go. But is it that simple? I'm not sure it is as simple as reflection, writing down some things on a piece of paper and burning them in a ritualistic manner. 

Is forgiveness an act or could it possibly be the change in a belief or re-routing your belief system? 

Or is forgiveness possibly within a power greater than ourselves? If one were to accept what happened factually and learn to live with the fact that the divorce and your ex-spouse's actions happened. Yet it is understandable not to be able to forgive your ex-spouse for the loss of your lifetime with your children. Perhaps acceptance on a thoughtful level coupled with an offer on one's own religious level that you offer to a "Greater Power" whether to forgive or to judge the ex-spouse is sometimes the best that can be expected.

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