Thing #5 - so now I can see why you would share and why you would not. I wonder if the resources we currently have could ever manage the open access of the amount of data created by the hour? Interesting ideas for the now and later!!!

Thing #4 - Wow this is just amazing what is out there that has been shared. Can anyone tell me more about the incentives to share your data. I am just at the beginning of my learning - maybe it's cudos for the Uni/organisation, maybe it's linked to research funding, maybe it's related to citation metrics? Any thoughts to share are much appreciated.

Thing #1 how can we could help people understand the complexity of formats of data so more people can access and reuse research data.

What am amazing journey 23 things will be!

I am thinking we may be able to offer opportunities for anyone to attend "Learning Spaces" to highlight/demo/deconstruct the use of research data of many kinds. Possibly including secondary school classes. The CSIRO Data Access Portal is just the beginning of discovery of such rich data for anyone.

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Google Plus is shutting down. What should be done with this community?

Deadline for submission for papers and lightning talks for IDCC extended to 2 July 2018

The deadline for papers and lightning talks for the 14th International Digital Curation Conference has been extended till 2 July. This conference will take place 4-7 February 2019 in Melbourne, Australia. The theme of the conference is: Collaborations and Partnerships: addressing the big digital challenges together. Please go to http://www.dcc.ac.uk/events/idcc19/submissions for details of the submission process.
Other submission deadlines:
- Demos and workshop submissions close on 31st July 2018
- Poster submissions close on 30th September 2018

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Data sharing in PLOS ONE: An analysis of Data Availability Statements
Lisa M. Federer , Christopher W. Belter, Douglas J. Joubert,Alicia Livinski, Ya-Ling Lu, Lissa N. Snyders, Holly Thompson
Published: May 2, 2018 https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0194768

tl;dr
Advances are slow but opportunities exist for improvement by all parties. Some mildly amusing curation fails - though none so embarrassing as when the University of Examples accidentally published to RDA. ;-)

Hi All,

I'm working on a project that requires some documented use cases for using a research data management planning tool. I'm curious to see if any one has any shareable documents that they have already prepared. Happy to share any findings that I have that you might be interested in.

Thanks,

Katie

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The Call for submissions IDCC February 2019 Melbourne is now open.

The 14th International Digital Curation Conference will take place on 4-7 February 2019 in Melbourne. The theme is ‘Collaborations and Partnerships: addressing the big digital challenges together’. This is the largest international large conference in the area of data management and curation and will take place for the first time in the Southern Hemisphere, organised in partnership with the University of Melbourne.

For full call information and details of how to submit, please go to http://www.dcc.ac.uk/events/idcc19/submissions
Paper submissions and lightning talks close on 18th June 2018.
Demos and workshop submissions close on 31st July 2018
Poster submissions close on 30th September 2018

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A nice endorsement of Open Science: https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/may/07/wikipedia-the-most-cited-authors-revealed-to-be-three-australian-scientists

"Finlayson said the popularity of the paper emphasised the importance of open science, which is the concept that data and findings should be openly and freely available so that others can use and benefit from them. Wikipedia operates on a similar concept, and credible citations are crucial to the encyclopaedia’s reliability.

“The journal we originally published the paper in is free and open access, and we chose the journal for that reason,” he said. “People noticed and said, ‘Hey, we have an updated climate map, we’ll use that’, and then it spread.”

At the time, open access journals were rare.

“I have always been a supporter of open science,” Finlayson said. “Research is no good to anyone locked in a cupboard, or published in a journal you have to pay a lot of money to access.”"
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