Post has shared content

Post has attachment
Here's a blog post that I wrote to demonstrate how you can use the icons that appear on the Google Docs "Share" button to quickly check the current Sharing levels of that Doc.

Post has attachment
These tutorials from Richard Byrne could be very helpful in social studies, world languages, and English classes.

Question... our AP World Languages courses need to do verbal recordings and they are using Chromebooks probably for the first time. Does anyone have any suggestions or ideas of apps that can be used easily by students to record and then download the files?
Thank you for any suggestions or help.

Are there any speech to text features on Google Classroom for answering questions? We use the speech to text feature on Google Docs, but I can't find the same options for Classroom. I would appreciate any advice! :)

Post has shared content
Family Engagement Strategy for sharing information with parents and/or guardians through the use of Google Classroom, Google Calendar, and Google Sites

Post has shared content
Resource for Social Studies teachers looking for original sources!! Looks good and great focus on Hamilton

Post has shared content
Good resource for teachers... free aspects to it.

Post has shared content
Great photo for science classes at all levels
A Fleeting Double Eclipse of the Sun
Image Credit & Copyright: Simon Tang
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap170828.html

Last week, for a fraction of a second, the Sun was eclipsed twice. One week ago today, many people in North America were treated to a standard, single, partial solar eclipse. Fewer people, all congregated along a narrow path, experienced the eerie daytime darkness of a total solar eclipse. A dedicated few with fast enough camera equipment, however, were able to capture a double eclipse -- a simultaneous partial eclipse of the Sun by both the Moon and the International Space Station (ISS). The Earth-orbiting ISS crossed the Sun in less than a second, but to keep the ISS from appearing blurry, exposure times must be less than 1/1000th of a second. The featured image composite captured the ISS multiple times in succession as it zipped across the face of the Sun. The picture was taken in a specific color emitted by hydrogen which highlights the Sun's chromosphere, a layer hotter and higher up than the usually photographed photosphere.
Photo

Post has attachment
Wait while more posts are being loaded