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Aaron Sturgill

Make Stuff!  - 
 
Looking for examples of group creation of a core setting element.

Why: Looking back at a Walking Dead-style Dread scenario I wrote, I described the GM as asking the players where their characters are based, whether it's mobile or stationary, etc. But: this is Dread! That should obviously be its own semi-codified questionnaire.

How (spitballing): I know that in many PBtA games, it has become common practice for players to draw something on the map as a part of character creation or introduction. That could definitely be a part of this, but I'm specifically concerned with distributing a number of questions to the players in a way that gives them agency in the creation of the setting. E.g., players should be able to choose from several questions that interest them: perhaps dealing each player three questions on index cards, each player chooses one and passes two to the left? I dunno.

What are some examples you can recall of mecahnically-simple games that include group creation of core setting elements?
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James Etheridge's profile photoAlexander Williams's profile photo
5 comments
 
"Include?" For Microscope (http://www.lamemage.com/microscope/) and Kingdom (http://www.lamemage.com/kingdom/), mechanically simple group creation of core setting elements are the game.

You don't need questionnaires. You don't need index cards. You just need the players to be able to make decisions in the game and about the world that they know and trust will be integrated by the other people at the table.
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Games with a preset "cast"
These are games like Lady Blackbird and Love in the Time of Seiđ where the game itself comes with a limited number of preset characters to pick from. Can anyone think of any of these games that came out earlier than 2009 (Lady Blackbird, Montsegur 1244)?
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Nick Wedig's profile photoGeorge Locke's profile photo
20 comments
 
+Nick Wedig yes. A vast catalog of one-shot larps with preset characters can be found, e.g. in the InterCon community. I happen to like nordic freeform, which typically uses preset characters (see alexandria.dk and jeepen.org).
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catty _big

Story Games  - 
 
 
I read this book a few weeks ago, and it occurred to me that it and others like it could provide inspiration to folks' sessions of WTHI. Trollope tends to write about posh rural folks, which is a rarefied milieu to many, with kitchen ranges and rose-covered cottages; however, the storylines are anything but rosy, with messy and complicated lives just as in any setting. The plot's quite complex, so I won't attempt to rehearse it here; suffice to say, if you're interested in games about families it's definitely worth a read.
Joanna Trollope has written several highly-acclaimed contemporary novels: The Choir, A Village Affair, A Passionate Man, The Rectors Wife, The Men and the Girls, A Spanish Lover, The Best of Friends, Next of Kin, Other Peoples Children, Marrying the Mistress and Girl from the South. Other Peoples Children has been shown on BBC television as a major drama serial. Under the name of Caroline Harvey she writes romantic historical novels. She has also...
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Howdy fine people
I'll run my first Psi*Run in several hours and I've got a question for you.
What if a Runner chose 'Delay the Chasers' or 'Remember something' as his goal?
What if the goal die infringes upon the chase or reveal dices?
Should I simply remove goal as a risk before the roll?
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Joseph Le May (UserClone)'s profile photoVolsung 2d6plusCool's profile photo
2 comments
 
The game was great. I realised 'goal' should be used as a pacing mechanic.
The more the runners achieved their goal, the quicker they could change places/scenes. ;)
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David Rothfeder

Make Stuff!  - 
 
 
So I've decided to start what's potentially a large rpg design project (yeah, right before game chef. I r smrt). In any case, I think this idea will either be really cool or really awful. It's called Warboys (yeah, named after Nux and friends) and it's basically about young people living under the expectations of emotionless violence. I took some ideas from some other projects I've worked on. This is a pretty rough sketch of the game so far, but I think it does a pretty decent job of laying out where the teeth will be. Let me know what you think.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B511-yaR3CdxTW52c0VCaHNmLU0
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Tengu Zame

Make Stuff!  - 
 
Hi guys,
Days ago I wrote this little game, inspired by the reading of Jeff Vandermeer's Annihilation . I haven't tested it yet, but I first would like to hear/read your impressions about it.
https://docs.google.com/document/d/14OxcCG_-mrznlfsIkHGJ4iJEPA7UyKXRm-sxyLMBQk8/edit?usp=sharing
Drive
It creepsIT CREEPS A game of mysteries and interrogatories What you need to play: A table and two chairs Some players (at least 2, no more than 5) Two complete decks of French playing cards Twelve 6-sided dice. Introduction Everything is going to collapse, they told you. Our world, as we know it, is on ...
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Lorenzo Gatti's profile photoTengu Zame's profile photo
2 comments
 
+Lorenzo Gatti thanks for your suggestions! Many of them seem very interesting, I'll try to implement some of them as soon as possible.
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Jason Cordova

Story Games  - 
 
Lots of story game talk in this episode of The Gauntlet Podcast. Check it out!
 
Hey, it's a new episode of The Gauntlet Podcast! This one marks my return to the show after taking a few weeks off. +Steve Mains and I are joined by +David LaFreniere from the Discern Realities podcast to talk about a lot of really cool games (and thanks to +Richard Rogers for the nice edit this week).

Here are the time codes:

Playlist
Gauntlet NJ update (01:07)
The Final Girl by +Bret Gillan (01:53)
Witch: The Road to Lindisfarne by +Kevin Barthaud and Ric Lacy (02:56)
Space Alert (09:56)
Cheat Your Own Adventure by Shane Mclean (15:16)
A Branch of May by +Meguey Baker (23:19)
To Serve Her Wintry Hunger by +Stephen Dewey (25:33)
Fall of Magic by +Ross Cowman (28:52)

Community Feedback
Temple Island story by +Tor Droplets (36:18)
https://plus.google.com/117582566260906817417/posts/1qRD4L54ePf

Links:
Stephen Dewey's Patreon
https://www.patreon.com/stephendewey?ty=h
iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-gauntlet-podcast/id951113347?mt=2 RSS: http://gauntletpodcast.libsyn.com/rss
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Derek A. Kamal

Pandering!  - 
 
Hi, all.

So this is super rough, and obviously it's a heavily lawyered IP, but the idea is a collaborative poem game about Tom Bombadil. Because he's the man.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1xZGNljkglejU3iMml58fuYMeV6JSM0lhKbwXOOYuLt0/edit?usp=sharing

Is this worth fleshing out more? Is there potential?
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Nick Wedig's profile photo
 
It's a start for a game. There are a few other story games that work sort of similarly, composing a story one sentence at a time.

I think with this setup, you'll wind up with meandering stories that lack overall structure. But that might be thematically appropriate, given the nature of Tom Bombadil. On the other hand, you might consider adding a structuring mechanic of some sort to the game.
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What recently released (or soon to be released) games are exciting you right now?
(Bonus points if someone else wrote them)
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Simon Brake's profile photoFraser Simons's profile photo
9 comments
 
Unknown armies and Noirlandia looks pretty cool to me, currently. 
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Patrick O'Leary

Stuff to Watch  - 
 
How to hack Dread and make a cool custom blood-splattered block tower in the process.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=95fwVYOE5QY
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Tim Jensen's profile photo
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About this community

This is currently a test beta of a Story Games G+ RPG -slash- Role-Playing Community. Just trying to figure stuff out. Not a replacement (yet) for the www.story-games.com forums!
In Your Heart

Stephen Morffew

Pandering!  - 
 
Being relatively new to story games, I feel like I'm forever playing catch up with the fantastic games that the hobby has produced. Case in point: I've only just got around to playing #Kagematsu . I had a great time playing it, and was inspired enough to write my first impressions/review in this blog post. Check it out!
Kagematsu is a roleplaying game by Danielle Lewon, based on a design by S.R. Knipe. The simplest, most obvious summary of the game would be to called it a romance game, but there are aspects to it …
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catty _big

Story Games  - 
 
 
Getting excited about Origins? I can't be there, sadly, but I know that for many of you this is one of the highlights of the gaming calendar, so if you're going, have fun, and roll some dice for me!
Last call for Early Bird pricing! Beginning June 1st, the cost for a badge will change to onsite pricing ($65). Make sure to register now to save money! To see badges and pricing visit the registration page. Pre-purchasing of events, ribbons and generics will close tomorrow.
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David Rothfeder

Make Stuff!  - 
 
 
GAME CHEF 2016



Game Chef is an annual analog game design competition. First held in 2002, it’s led to the creation of hundreds of envelope-pushing first drafts and a number of finished games that are now well-known in the story gaming community. Game Chef gives participants 1 theme, 4 ingredients, and 9 days in which to create an analog / tabletop game.

The competition runs simultaneously in six languages this year. Entries are peer reviewed, with finalists submitted to the global coordinators. A winner is chosen in each language, with one emerging as the year’s world champion.

Game Chef is for you, regardless of whether you’ve ever thought of yourself as a game designer. We aim to make the competition as accessible and welcoming as possible.



The Basics

Design and submit a playable draft of an analog (non-video) game between June 4th and 12th, inspired by the theme and ingredients listed below. Historically most Game Chef games have been tabletop roleplaying games or live action games, but innovative designers like you are constantly breaking down and re-envisioning the divisions between different types of games (board games, card games, roleplaying games, live action games, etc.) Feel free to push the boundaries of what counts as a roleplaying game, an analog game, or a game.

Each participant will review four games that others submit, and this peer-review process will determine finalists. A winner for each language that Game Chef runs in will be declared, though the real victory is completing a game in the first place.

This year, Game Chef runs simultaneously in the following language communities: Brazilian Portuguese, English, French, Italian, Polish, and Spanish.



2016 Theme

This year’s theme is: Technology


Pervasive and transformative, technology has always played a role in the evolution and transformation of humanity, ranging from the beneficial to the catastrophic. For this year's game chef, we invite you to explore, question and discuss the impact of technology on games and on human society. How can you represent technological change in a game? What about the social and anthropological repercussions? What present has technology led us to, and what future is it building?

We also invite you to explore the role of current and future technologies in game design: how can they complement, expand and transform analog gaming? How can new tools enrich classic game practices, and what entirely new doors do they open? When a smartphone is as common as a six-sided die, and gamers meet over videochat and apps as often as they meet over maps and miniatures, what makes a game analog? Your game may use whatever props or technology you deem necessary. However, we don't require reviewers or judges to actually playtest the games in order to judge them. They can judge your work on its creativity and playability alone. If your game requires a piece of technology, the more common that technology is, the more likely reviewers are to actually playtest your game
Game Chef has a storied legacy of fostering forward-looking, innovative game design. This year, we invite you once again to push boundaries, blaze new trails, and show us the technological future of analog gaming.


2016 Ingredients

This year’s four ingredients are: alarm, dance, sketch, and sunlight.

Incorporate 2-3 of the ingredients into your design. Try to incorporate the ingredients as centrally as you can, as part of the premise or the rules or however else makes sense to you. A passing reference is okay if that’s all you can come up with, but we suggest really drawing strongly on the ingredients. Like the theme, you’re free to interpret these ingredients in whatever way you want.

For example, the 2004 ingredients were ice, island, dawn, assault, which ended up inspiring games like The Mountain Witch (climbing icy Mount Fuji to assault the witch’s fortress), The Dance and the Dawn (try to find your true love at an island social gathering, hoping that — when dawn breaks — you don’t end up with the one that has a heart of ice), and Polaris (arctic elves struggle against themselves and a demonic assault, with the dawn finally coming for the first time in hundreds of years).



Game Format

There are a few guidelines for game format. Each guideline exists to make sure your game is accessible (especially to the peers who get randomly selected to review your game).

Strive to make your game formatting as accessible as possible. Make an effort to ensure that your game is accessible to those who are blind (and using a screen-reading device), deaf, or color-blind. The easiest (but not the only) way to ensure that your entry is accessible is to submit it in one of the following formats: a plain text file, a tagged PDF, a Google Drive file (or hyperlinked set of files), or an RTF (Rich-Text Format) document. Avoid using cluttered backgrounds or anything low-contrast. If you want to submit your game as a video file, you should also provide captions and a transcript. If you want to submit your game as an audio file, provide a transcript. Doing extravagant things with your submission is fine, but the responsibility lies with you to make sure that it remains accessible to readers.

Submissions should be under 4,000 words. If you create extras for your game, like playbooks, quickstart sheets, or other handouts, these extras count toward the word limit. Participants MAY choose to create extras that push their word count above 4,000, but judges and peer reviewers are not required to read any materials beyond the 4,000 word limit. There is no minimum number of words for games, as long as the text is long enough to be comprehensible.

Your submission doesn’t need to be a single file, but it does need to be a single link. In order to make sure your game is easy to share with reviewers, we require that you provide us with a single link for your entire game. This can be a download link to a zipped folder, a Google document that links out to additional materials, a YouTube video link, or something else--as long as you provide reviewers a single link to your game, it counts. Make sure that access to your submission does not require proprietary softwar



Rule on Previous Work

You may draw on concepts you have thought about or worked on before the contest, but everything you submit must be new work, not existing material. Plagiarism or self-plagiarism will disqualify your game.



Rule on Intellectual Property

It is ultimately the designer’s responsibility to deal with all rights-related issues. Including excerpts from public domain or open source content is fine, as long as you cite them. Drawing inspiration from other games is also fine, but give credit and put it in your own words.



Game Submission

Games are due before midnight UTC-10 on June 12th. To submit, complete the submission form provided by your language coordinator. Your game materials can be presented in any easily-accessed format, provided it’s contained within a single link (e.g., a Google Doc index, a zipped download folder, an online presentation, a website).

In order to do this, you may need to upload your files somewhere (options include: Dropbox, a WordPress media library, or other solutions). Contact an organizer if you need help doing this.

You may submit as part of a team. You may only submit one game total to one of the participant language competitions.



Initial Reviewing

Once games are submitted, each participant will be assigned 4 games to review. We will announce the deadline for you to pick one of the four to recommend for the next round. Your recommendation can be based on whatever criterion you determine to be most important. You may want to consider what each game accomplishes in terms of innovation, clarity, ingredient usage, and current playability. You don’t need to explain or defend your decision – just pick and recommend one of the four games.

As part of reviewing each game, we ask that you write a short critique/appraisal and send it to the game’s author. As Game Chef is a short competition that will inevitably create half-finished products, you don’t need to focus on fine details of language. Instead, share what you liked, what you were confused about, any ideas that you have for improvement or development, and any decisions you hope the designer will rethink. You can either email the designer your feedback or post it to their design thread if they started somewhere you can see. Aim to be helpful and encouraging.



Picking Winners

The games that receive the most nominations will be reviewed by the Community Coordinators for their language. One game from each language will be declared a winner for its language, and an international finalists. The international finalists will be translated into a common tongue and judged by an international cabal. One game from amongst these finalists will be crowned Game Chef Grand Champion. Additional awards and achievements may be awarded at the discretion of the shadowy ranks of past Game Chef Champions.

Winning Game Chef is a funny business. It’s a great honor, but the real focus of the competition is in stirring a great number of people into creative endeavor. We choose a winner in order to create that extra edge and push competitors to do their best work, while acknowledging that the real victory is getting a community to come together and make new stuff.
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As If

Stuff to Watch  - 
 
I was interviewed! Read along as Brie Sheldon asks me "Five Or So Questions" about "DayTrippers" - the surreal science fiction reality-hopping roleplaying game...
 
"A trad game with narrativist elements, the DayTrippers system is optimized for spurious improvisation and high bleed. That's where the surreal stuff comes from: it's a combination of GM ideas, the output of random generators, and the "Psychic Content" contributed by the Players themselves. In play, the game tends to elicit ideas that weren't even considered when the session began, and it incorporates these changes in unpredictable ways. The GM is not playing against you: instead, together you're creating a story that has bizarre twists in it, and weirdness flows freely as narrative control goes back and forth. For all these reasons, a DayTrippers adventure is capable of surprising not only the Players, but the GM as well."
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Arlene Medder's profile photo
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Tony Tucker

Pandering!  - 
 
Tony Tucker originally shared:
 
Mezmerized by the byzantine trail of the Internet Killer. #Noirlandia

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Carl Gerriets

Story Games  - 
 
Are there any storygames designed for PCs to be immortals/gods/earth-shaking-level-wizards/etc?

I'm specifically looking for games that explicitly assume that and provide rule support (of some kind, narrative-focused much better than physics simulation) for awesome powers and the kinds of challenges faced by such folks.
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Tobie Abad's profile photo오승한's profile photo
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catty _big

Story Games  - 
 
In a thread on a web forum talking about the difference between RPGs and storygames (I know, it goes on and on doesn't it?), someone replied to a post I'd made with some (mostly) unexceptionable comments, but chose to open with the following sentence:
NB: In this post I repeatedly use "RPGs" as a shorthand for "trad RPGs".

Sheesh.
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As If's profile photoBenjamin Davis's profile photo
2 comments
 
NB: In this post I repeatedly use "music" to mean "Handel's choral works"
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As If

Story Games  - 
 
Seeking your Review!  I'm reaching out to contact bloggers and 'casters who are interested in reviewing the recently-released "Other Borders" - an alternate setting for +Tom McGrenery's Malandros (a DramaSystem  game).  Note: Because this book is an expansion, reviewers should have some familiarity with both Malandros and DramaSystem.  If you're such a person, drop me a line or post a comment below, and I'll get a PDF to you!
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Francesco Zani

Pandering!  - 
 
What great tools would you suggest for someone just approaching game design, in order to simplify/support the design process?
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Benjamin Davis's profile photoDavid “Sunwalker” Grossoleil's profile photo
5 comments
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Stephen Morffew

Make Stuff!  - 
 
 
I have updated and condensed the rules for my game Hubris Box, about the dramatic rise and tragic fall of flawed protagonists. Check it out! Feedback if you can!
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