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When it comes to a disagreeable court ruling, learn to make your strongest argument while remaining respectful to the judge.
An an attorney and an officer of the court, you sometimes have competing duties: to represent your clients zealously and to maintain respect for the court. When it comes to a disagreeable court rul...
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Larry Bodine

General Discussion  - 
 
9 Qualities of Successful Female Attorneys | The National Trial Lawyers http://ow.ly/LXNx8
By Lyndsay Markley I’m frequently asked to speak about women in law and specifically the issue that only a small percentage of female attorneys are given management and shareholder status, despite ...
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Mitch Jackson
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Opening Statement  - 
 
5 Ways to Maximize Persuasion During Opening Statements - Part 1

http://www.a2lc.com/blog/5-ways-to-maximize-persuasion-during-opening-statements-part-1
Part one of a multi-part series designed to improve opening statements by litigator Ryan H. Flax of A2L Consulting.
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Mitch Jackson
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Evidence Related  - 
 
“Did Your Jurors Ever See 'The Smoking Gun'?”
by Elliott Wilcox

If you try enough cases, you'll eventually get your hands on “It.”  

“It” is that amazing piece of evidence that makes or breaks your case. 

“It” takes on many different forms:

The “Are you lying then or are you lying now?” prior inconsistent statement

The “I did it, and I'd do it again!” confession

The video of the “disabled” plaintiff easily lifting 50 lb. bags of mulch or participating in semi-professional wrestling matches

The “smoking gun” email that proves the defendant knew about the potential danger and decided to cover it up rather than recall the product
“It” is that piece of evidence that you can't wait to show to the jury.  You won't have “It” in every case, but when you do, it's a wonderful feeling.  You know that as soon as you show “It” to the jury, the case will be won.

But hold on just a second.  There's something important you should know before you show “It” to the jury. 

No matter how damning that prior inconsistent statement may be, it's worthless if the jury can't hear it.  Even if your video completely contradicts the plaintiff's claims, it's worthless if the jury can't see it.  

Some jurors are too embarrassed to admit they can't hear the recording, can't read your exhibit, or can't see your video.  You need to be assured that they see and hear “It.”  Here's how to do it:

My, what big ears you have!1. How to guarantee that the jury hears every word of your recorded statement.  As you start playing the audio recording, cup your hand over your ear and make eye contact with each and every juror.  Non-verbally, you're asking them if they can hear the statement.  If they can hear it, they'll nod their heads in agreement or give you a “thumbs-up” sign.  If they can't hear, they'll give you a non-verbal clue to raise the volume (or maybe even tell you, “Turn it up, I can't hear!”) 

Here's an added benefit: Making eye contact with each juror forces you to “check in” with them, so you can evaluate how things are going.

2. How to guarantee that the jury sees your video.  Get to the courtroom early and set up your video display.  Turn on your video, then climb into the jury box.  Sit in every seat in the jury box so you can see what your jurors will see.  Do you need to crane your neck to see the video?  When you move to the end of each row, does it become difficult to see the video screen?  Is the screen too close?  Too far?  Make any adjustments now, before the jury gets here, so you can be assured that they'll see your evidence.

Once you start playing the video for the jury, you'll want to repeat the step outlined above to ensure that they can hear the recording.  While you're making eye contact with each juror, track their sightline.  Can they actually see the video?  Are they actually looking at it?  If not, make any necessary adjustments so they can view your evidence.

3. How to guarantee that the jury reads your exhibit.  If you're presenting written exhibits to the jury (such as posters of the jury instructions or blow-ups of contract highlights) you want to make sure the jury actually reads your exhibit.  To make sure they have enough time to read it, quietly read through the entire exhibit to yourself twice.  You're already familiar with the exhibit, so you're going to read through it faster than your jurors will.  After your second read-through, take a moment to make eye contact with every juror.  Look at their eye movement.  If they're looking at you, they're ready for you to proceed.  But if you see they're still reading, don't say anything yet.  Wait until everyone has finished reading before you or your witness say anything about the exhibit.

If you've done your homework, you already know how to make “It” admissible.  You also know when you should publish “It” for maximum persuasive effect.  Now just follow these simple tips, and you'll guarantee that jurors will see and hear your most important evidence.

_____________

Elliott Wilcox publishes Trial Tips Newsletter. Sign up today for your free subscription and a copy of his special reports: “How to Successfully Make & Meet Objections” and “The Ten Critical Mistakes Trial Lawyers Make (and how to avoid them)” at www.TrialTheater.com
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The "Perfect Cross Examination" is possible with the will to win, exhaustive preparation, and impeccable execution. #criminaljustice   #criminallaw   #criminaldefense  
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Mitch Jackson
owner

General Discussion  - 
 
Use this approach in trial: How to Make PowerPoint Trial Timelines Feel More Like a Long Document 

http://www.a2lc.com/blog/how-to-make-powerpoint-trial-timelines-feel-more-like-a-long-document
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This is a fantastic resource +Mitch Jackson  that I plan to begin utilizing in my practice :)
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Mitch Jackson
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General Discussion  - 
 
Often times how we communicate has a great deal more to do with body language than what we say. This is especially true in jury trials. You may find this video useful when preparing for your next case: 

Body language and gender from a dancer's perspective via Natalia Khosla | TEDxYale  https://youtu.be/ZBg5QvcZQP8
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Mitch Jackson
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General Discussion  - 
 
“The Judge Spoke... But Did You Get a Ruling?”
by Elliott Wilcox

Judges are just like everyone else: They hate to be told, “You’re wrong.” In fact, some judges are so afraid of having their rulings overturned by the appellate courts that they’ve decided to take an easy way out: They’ve stopped making rulings!  After all, if there isn't a ruling, there’s nothing for the appellate court to overturn, right?  Here's a typical scenario:

Attorney #1: What happened at the executive council meeting?
Witness: Well, I heard that...

Attorney #2: Objection! Hearsay!

Attorney #1: It's not hearsay, your Honor, because [reason].

Judge: Move it along, counselor.

Attorney #1: Ok. Let's talk about [different subject]...

Situations like this arise every day in courtrooms around the country. Using a combination of body language, tone, and other non-verbal behaviors, judges subtly encourage lawyers to rephrase questions or move on to new topics. When you're caught up in the heat of battle, it feels like the judge has issued a ruling, so you rephrase your question or move onto another topic. In reality, no ruling has been issued, because the judge hasn't ordered you or your opponent to do anything. A common term for describing this type of action is called a "non-ruling."

The most effective "non-ruling" judges you'll encounter are often the friendliest judges you'll encounter in your practice. These judges succeed at "non-ruling" by drawing upon your inner desire to be a consummate professional, while also creating a congenial courtroom attitude. By encouraging both litigators to just "go along and get along," they can avoid issuing stern rulings (and also avoid a reversal from the appellate bench). Usually, "non-rulings" will be disguised as kindly suggestions, such as, "Why don't you go ahead and rephrase your question, ok?" Since you don't want to stir up the pot, you're usually inclined to go along with the judge's suggestion.

Here are some other common methods judges use to issue "non-rulings":

"Move it along, counselor."
"Please rephrase your question."
"Ask a different question."
"Go ahead."

Silence, combined with a scowl of the face or a nod of the head.
From a day-to-day practice point of view, "non-rulings" probably aren't that big a deal for experienced trial lawyers, because it's easy to rephrase your questions and work around them. However, here are two reasons why you should be wary when a judge issues "non-ruling."

First, if you're a neophyte lawyer, you're probably a little nervous in the courtroom. When the judge tells you to "move it along," you're likely to overreact, skipping past evidence that should be admissible.

The second (and more insidious) problem with "non-rulings" is the effect they have on your appellate record. "Non-rulings" leave the losing party without an appellate remedy. In the event of a non-ruling, the appellate court will always uphold the lower court decision. Why? Because the judge didn't order either party to do anything. Instead of issuing an order, he simply left the matter in your hands and your opponent's hands. If you decided not to ask the question or not to admit the evidence, that's your fault, not the judge's fault, and the appellate court can't help you.

So what do you do? How can you fix the situation? Well, it depends. First, you should decide if you really need the judge to rule. Sometimes, a non-ruling is all you need. If you're the one who's been objected to, you can simply rephrase your question and seek another way to introduce your evidence. If you're the one objecting, you've put your opponent on notice not to go down that road, and that may be enough to keep him from revisiting the issue.

But let's say that you really need a ruling. What do you do then? If you need the judge to rule, you probably shouldn't tell him what to do. After all, nobody likes to be told what to do, especially judges. Instead, consider asking the judge for a ruling. Obviously, you'll need to be polite when asking the judge for a ruling. Here are a few examples of how to ask:

The polite request: "Your Honor, before I continue, could I ask you to rule on the objection?" 

The clarification: "Judge, can I clarify your ruling? You're ruling that the entire conversation is hearsay, right?"

The inferential nudge: "So you're sustaining my objection, your Honor?"
Most of the time, non-rulings won't cause any permanent damage to your case. However, when you need the court to issue a ruling, you really need the court to issue a ruling. In those situations, make sure you've got your ears perked up to listen for any "non-rulings," and then be prepared to correct the situation before your case goes to the appellate level.
____________

 Elliott Wilcox publishes Trial Tips Newsletter. Sign up today for your free subscription and a copy of his special reports: “How to Successfully Make & Meet Objections” and “The Ten Critical Mistakes Trial Lawyers Make (and how to avoid them)” at www.TrialTheater.com
Trial lawyers, discover how to persuade jurors and win your next jury trial. You will learn valuable tips for improving your jury selection, opening statement, direct examination, cross-examination, and closing arguments.
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About this community

Welcome to our Trial Lawyer Tips Google Plus Community! _______________ This community is for all lawyers interested in trial advocacy. It's also for anyone else interested in litigation and trials (you don't have to be a lawyer to be part of our community. _______________ Below is the link to our community. Please bookmark and share it with other trial lawyers who are interested in sharing good trial tips and raising the bar when it comes to the art of court and jury trials TrialLawyerTips.com _______________ Important! Please, NO SOLICITATION, SELF PROMOTION OR ADVERTISING. If your post isn't regarding a trial tip (article, video, podcast, link...) then it will be removed :-) Questions or comments? Contact Mitch Jackson at mitch@jacksonwilson.com or 800.661.7044
 
 
Tips for successfully assessing your adversary’s goals, capabilities, and willingness to fight.
When it comes to litigating a case, your client's objectives are only half the story. If you want to gain an advantage, you'll also need to successfully assess your adversary's goals, capabilities,...
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Mitch Jackson
owner

Opening Statement  - 
 
5 Ways to Maximize Persuasion During Opening Statements - Part 2 (via +A2L Consulting )

http://www.a2lc.com/blog/5-ways-to-maximize-persuasion-during-opening-statements-part-2
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Mitch Jackson
owner

General Discussion  - 
 
The 31st College of Trial Advocacy (Civil) via the Orange County Bar Association (Orange County, CA)

https://www.ocbar.org/Events/EventDetail.aspx?sessionaltcd=COTA2015
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Mitch Jackson
owner

Cross Examination  - 
 
“Cross Examining with Exhibits”
by Elliott Wilcox

Ever watched the cross-examination of a really adverse witness?

A couple of years ago, I watched a trial with one of the most adverse witnesses you could imagine.

During opening statements, the attorney accused the witness of sexually molesting the lawyer's client when she was 8 years old. He also claimed that the witness covered up the death of a young child.  

As you can imagine, the witness wasn't too happy about the allegations.

Now, one day later, the witness is testifying and the attorney is cross-examining him.

The tension in the courtroom is palpable.  There's no love lost between these two, and in fact, no one in the courtroom would be surprised if the witness jumped out of the witness stand and tried to punch his first through the attorney's skull.

He is (as you probably would be if you were in the same situation), a very antagonistic witness.

In a million years, do you think that he'd ever try to help the defense attorney's case?

Yet, in spite of all of the hatred that probably exists between the two of them, the defense attorney acts as if he expects the witness to help him out.

What exactly does he do? 

He sets up some gigantic calendar pages on an easel, and then asks the Court's permission to have the witness step down from the witness stand and fill in some dates on the calendar pages.

First of all, when you think that a witness really hates you, you probably shouldn't ask them to step down from the witness stand...  it makes it too easy for them to take a swing at you!

And, of course, you don't want to put any type of stabbing weapon, like a marker, in their hands.

But even if the witness isn't intent on killing you, it's just risky trial advocacy to ask an opposing witness to step down and write on your exhibits. 

Remember, during cross-examination, YOU are the star of the show.  You get to use the only tool in your arsenal, the leading question, to tell your winning story through your opponent's witnesses.  The leading question is the only tool you have to maintain control during cross-examination.

And control is an essential part of cross-examination.  You don't want to cede control to the witness...  who knows what he might say or do if you put him in the driver's seat!

So, back to our courtroom situation...

What could possibly go wrong by asking an opposing witness to step down and write on your exhibits during cross-examination?

Well, a couple of things.

First, the witness can go berserk and write all over your exhibits.  Not likely, but hey, it could happen. 

Next, even if he's not going to go nuts, you're still giving him the opportunity to become the star of the show and to direct the jury's attention towards matters that he thinks are important.  Rather than putting a simple "X" on the calendar, he can write a more lengthy response, or phrase it in such a way that it doesn't help your case.

Third, by asking the witness to step down from the witness stand, you're asking the jurors to focus their attention on him, rather than you.  Their eyes will be drawn to him because he's moving (which breaks up the visual boredom of a trial), but also because, when you give him a marker and stand him up before the jury, you put him in the role of "The Teacher" -- do you really want them to see your opposing witness in that light?

Why let him have control or the spotlight, even for a moment?  During cross, you want to direct the action and control the tempo. 

What would I have recommended instead?

Well, first of all, I have to say that the idea of using gigantic calendar pages is a great idea, since it (literally) puts everyone in the courtroom on the same page when discussing the timeline in the case.

However, rather than asking him to step down from the witness stand and write on the board, I would recommend maintaining control with a combination of leading questions and body language:

Q: "The last day you saw your granddaughter was June 15th, right?"

A: "Yes."

Then move over to your giant calendar and mark on the June 15th date to indicate the event. 

It's not a major difference, but it prevents the witness from expanding his answers or becoming a "teacher" to the jury.  By maintaining control throughout your cross-examination, YOU will be the star of cross-examination, and will be able to tell your winning story through your opponent's witnesses.

Good luck!

_________

Elliott Wilcox publishes Trial Tips Newsletter. Sign up today for your free subscription and a copy of his special reports: “How to Successfully Make & Meet Objections” and “The Ten Critical Mistakes Trial Lawyers Make (and how to avoid them)” at www.TrialTheater.com

#law   #jurytrial   #trialtips  
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Marc Hurd

General Discussion  - 
 
I always wish, as a trial lawyer, that I could serve on a jury.  This presents one guy's experience.

http://abovethelaw.com/2015/04/beyond-biglaw-lessons-from-jury-duty-part-1/
What did lessons about litigation did Gaston Kroub learn from his recent jury duty?
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Mitch Jackson
owner

General Discussion  - 
 
The CEO in Litigation: Problems, Solutions and Witness Preparation  http://www.a2lc.com/blog/the-ceo-in-litigation-problems-solutions-and-witness-preparation
The very qualities that make the CEO successful may make them a poor witness. Good witness preparation will prevent unfavorable perceptions.
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Great list of cross-examination resources. Thanks +The Law Office of Jerry Jenkins, PA for sharing with the community. Scheduling this link to share on Twitter!
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Mitch Jackson
owner

General Discussion  - 
 
The Most Dangerous Word in Your Courthouse 
by Elliott Wilcox

Do you know what the most dangerous word in your vocabulary is? 

You say it all the time.  It’s the most commonly used word in the English language.  If you listen to any conversation, especially conversations between lawyers, you’ll hear this word more often than any other.   More than any other, this word leads to claims of improper argument and unprofessional conduct.  Which word is it? 

“I.” 

That’s right - “I.”  The shortest word in the dictionary is also the most dangerous.  But what makes it so dangerous?

“I” is dangerous because it leads to statements like “I think…” or “I believe…”  Regardless of whether it’s an argument to the judge, a statement to the press, or an offhand comment during final summation, these seemingly innocuous phrases can have disastrous effects.  The phrase “I believe” can overturn an otherwise valid verdict, or lead to disciplinary referral.

How did “I” become so dangerous?  It has its origins in the English legal system.  They call it the “cab rank” rule.  Keith Evans, former barrister and author of Common Sense Rules of Advocacy for Lawyers, says, “if you are offered a case that is within your field of expertise, then, if the client is willing to pay what you usually charge and your calendar shows you are free to take the case - you don’t have any choice in the matter.  You must accept it.  If you turn it down you can be disciplined, even disbarred!” 

The rule was designed to prevent loathsome clients from finding themselves without representation.  It doesn’t matter whether you think the case is a winner or a loser, you are obligated to take up the cause and represent your client as best you can.  The barrister’s personal feelings are irrelevant.  He is there to argue one side or the other of the dispute, not to express personal opinions.

That view has been passed on to our American system, and codified in many of our professional codes.  For example, the ABA’s Model Rule 3.4 of Professional Conduct states, “A lawyer shall not... ‘state a personal opinion as to the justness of a cause, the credibility of a witness, the culpability of a civil litigant or the guilt or innocence of an accused...’”

That’s the “official” reason why you shouldn’t state a personal belief in your case.  Here’s a more compelling reason why you shouldn’t state your personal opinion in a case: It’s not persuasive.

Candidly, who cares what you think?  It may sound harsh, but, in the courtroom, who cares what you believe?  Unless the jurors personally know you and trust your opinion, why should they believe something you say?  Simply because you said so? 

The only lawyer that the jurors trust in your courtroom is the judge - your opinion doesn’t carry much weight.  Yet many lawyers persist in sharing their personal opinions.  Recently, I’ve heard the phrases “I believe...” and “I think...” on a regular basis.  Here are three recent examples from criminal court:

A defense attorney seeking a more lenient sentence for her client: “I truly believe that this is a case that deserves pre-trial diversion.”

A prosecutor’s comment to the paper regarding the possibility of re-trying a defendant after a mistrial: “I think he is guilty of the charge, and he should be prosecuted.”

An assistant public defender at a motion to suppress: “I believe that my client’s version of events is the more credible one, and therefore the court should adopt my client’s version as the more credible version.”
All of these comments were made by competent, experienced, and professional courtroom advocates.  Yet somehow, they resorted to using one of the weakest argumentative devices available.  It’s the same argument your mom resorted to when she couldn’t think of any other reason why you needed to go to bed: “Because I said so!”  It wasn’t persuasive then, and it’s not persuasive now. 

Think about it for a moment.  Which idea do you prefer - the idea that someone else proposes, or the one that you think of on your own?  Once you reach a conclusion on your own, you take personal pride in the conclusion.  When someone attacks your conclusion you’ll not only actively disagree with them, you’ll cling even closer to your conclusion. 

Jurors and audience members are the same.  They like their ideas better than they like your ideas.  Using “I” or stating your personal opinion shortcuts your persuasive powers.  They aren’t going to believe something just because you say it’s so. 

Avoid the risks of a re-trial or a professional remand by omitting “I” from your vocabulary.  Start by reading through the draft of your next presentation.  Every time you see the word, “I,” strike it from the page.  Can you replace it with the word “you”?  Your jurors, readers, or listeners care more about themselves than they do about you, anyway.  Give them what they want - talk about them.  Approach your argument from their perspective.  When you strike “I” from your courtroom vocabulary, you’ll become one of the most persuasive attorneys in your courthouse. 

(Well, that’s what “I” believe, anyhow...)

-------------------

Elliott Wilcox publishes Trial Tips Newsletter. Sign up today for your free subscription and a copy of his special reports: “How to Successfully Make & Meet Objections” and “The Ten Critical Mistakes Trial Lawyers Make (and how to avoid them)” at www.TrialTheater.com
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Larry Bodine

General Discussion  - 
 
No Facts to Support Damage Cap Law in Missouri | PersonalInjury.com http://ow.ly/KySMG
Ken Vuylsteke, the President of the Missouri Association of Trial Attorneys By Larry Bodine, Editor in Chief, Personalinjury.com. According to Ken Vuylsteke, the President of Missouri Association of Trial Attorneys, there are no facts to support the looming enactment of lawsuit damage caps in his state:
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Mitch Jackson
owner

Evidence Related  - 
 
How to Make Documentary Evidence Come to Life
by Elliott Wilcox

It was a paper-intensive trial, one of those cases where the phrase “Plaintiff's Exhibit #2,598,124” doesn't seem to shock anyone.  Because the stakes were high, it was a well-financed operation, and both parties brought a lot of technology with them. 

One of the gizmos the plaintiffs brought with them to help present their evidence was a computer projector and a visual display program like Sanction or Trial Director.  If you try document-intensive cases, you know the importance of using these programs to help jurors focus on the important elements of your evidence.  Unfortunately, despite all the benefits these programs offer, if you don't use them correctly, they'll actually detract from the persuasiveness of your case.  As I was watching the plaintiff's attorney present his evidence, I saw a few mistakes that negatively impacted his case.  Here are the mistakes I observed and tips to help improve your presentation the next time you're exhibiting documentary evidence:

1. Don't expect jurors to read the entire page when it's displayed on a computer screen.  This case was tried in our courthouse's ceremonial courtroom.  The ceremonial courtroom uses 42" flatscreens to display images to the gallery, and smaller LCD displays to present images to the jurors.  It’s a nice system, but if you don’t zoom in to particular parts of the page, it’s impossible to read an entire page of a document.  When you try to view the entire page on those monitors, it looks like this image to the right.  Yes, you can see it, but you can't actually read it.  Even with a hi-def screen, it’s impossible to focus on the entire page.  The only time you should show the jury the entire page of a document is when you're trying to give the jurors an overview of the document they're about to see.  Let them see what the document looks like, but don’t expect them to be able to read it.

The solution?  Zoom in.  Focus on one part of the document, and give your jurors a chance to digest that portion before moving on to the next section.  Probably a good recommendation would be to show the jurors just one paragraph at a time.  (A fiction writer’s paragraph -- not a lawyer’s paragraph that goes on for 40 lines.)  Look at this example to the right.  It's not enough to just highlight the important portion -- you need to blow it up if you want the jurors to see it.  By blowing up the paragraph you want them to focus on, they can actually read the portion that matters to you.  Make it easy for your jury to absorb the information, and they'll be more likely to remember it.

2.  Don't compete with your visual aids.  Visual images are usually far more compelling than aural testimony, so your jurors' attention is usually going to be drawn towards your TV screen, not towards you or your witness.  When you’re no longer referring to the on-screen document and you want the jury to focus on your witness, switch your display screen to a blank screen so the jurors aren't distracted.  (If you have the option, switch to a black screen rather than white, because the white screen is harsher on the eyes.)

3.  Don't shine bright lights in your jurors' eyes.  Turn off any distracting lights. The lawyer wasn’t using an overhead image viewer to display any images, since all of his documents had been scanned into Sanction.  But for some reason, he'd turned the overhead projector on, so the projector light was shining brightly.  Every time he moved between the jurors and the bright light, they would go from darkness to bright lights shining in their eyes.  (Ouch!)  That can be distracting.  Be mindful of the projector lights and overhead display lights, so you don't subject your jurors to a similar experience.

4.  Don't publish private information.  This last tip won't necessarily make your presentations better, but it might make your clients (or their clients) happier.  As I mentioned earlier, this was a document intensive trial.  The plaintiff's lawyer was publishing LOTS of documents to the jury using the projection monitors.  That meant that everyone in the courtroom could see the information.  Some of the documents he published contained private information that wasn't essential to the case.  For example, one of his documents published the names, addresses, dates of birth, and social security numbers for 5 different individuals who weren't involved in the case.  Hopefully, there wasn't an identity thief in the courtroom that day, because that's all the information he'd need to destroy their lives.  Unless it's essential to your case, consider blacking out social security numbers and other private information from your documents before publishing them to the jury.  (Just make sure you clear it with opposing counsel in advance, and also explain to the jury why the information is blacked out.)

Your ability to persuasively present documentary evidence is essential to the success of your case.  Follow these quick and simple tips, and you'll make it easy for jurors to focus on your documents and remember the essential details of your case.

____________
Elliott Wilcox publishes Trial Tips Newsletter. Sign up today for your free subscription and a copy of his special reports: “How to Successfully Make & Meet Objections” and “The Ten Critical Mistakes Trial Lawyers Make (and how to avoid them)” at www.TrialTheater.com
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Mitch Jackson
owner

Opening Statement  - 
 
Free A2L Consulting Webinar: 5 Ways to Maximize Persuasion During Opening Statements

http://communications.a2lc.com/5-ways-to-maximize-persuasion-during-opening-statements
If you can win the battle of opening statements, you'll likely win your trial. Up to eighty-percent of jurors will make up their minds about your case during opening statements. In this webinar you'll learn the top-five ways to maximize persuasiveness during opening statements. From how to tell compelling stories to visually supporting your key arguments, this one-hour will reveal the best secrets from courtroom persuasion experts. Ryan H. Flax, ...
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