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IMPORTANT NOTE: Please read this post first if you are new to the community.

This G+ community started as an on-line support site for a workshop I did at the 2016 Calgary City Teachers Convention. I'm now using it to support teachers (and others) who are interested in Telling Stories with Scratch.

If my plans work out this should become quite a "full" site. To avoid just having a jumble of posts I plan on monitoring the site closely and modifying it as necessary.

To make navigation as easy as possible, categories will be moved up or down the Navigation bar to reflect what ever happens to be the current focus of the community. They will also be numbered from 1 to 9 to reflect how "in focus" they currently are. Categories with a lower number indicating a more relevant category than I will also number them. I will also try to develop a scheme to sequence posts in some kind of logical sequence. At present they follow the usual convention, namely the more recent the post the higher up they appear on the page.
I'm numbering my posts so that , posts will be numbered to provide a suggested reading order.

Categories and posts will be archived or deleted when they become obsolete.

I want to be able to assist my Grade 7 students to use Scratch to create project work in both ELA and Social Studies. For example, one of my English assignments requires students to show the development of tension in a novel they have read and I think Scratch would be a good medium for this.

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A Resource set for Work Beyond Google CS First Activities

Check Out https://www.cs-first.com/beyond-cs-first

What would you like to get out of this session? Please outline your "get outs" as comments

Post 2 08-03-2016 - Digital Story Telling
Digital storytelling resembles video storytelling. Both use top down design and bottom up production. This work fair will look at how these aspects of computational thinking can be used to:

1. Develop conceptual outlines, story boards and draft and final scripts
2. Use Scratch to produce the products

The focus will be on the story telling process. Scratch expertise not required. Sample projects will be provided. Post workshop follow-up will be encouraged.



Post 1 08/03/2016 - 2016 CS4HS Session Description for:
Teaching Thinking through Story Telling, Simulating and Gaming with Scratch

Two independent one-day sessions focusing on using Scratch to teach computational thinking.

Day one will focus on linking computational thinking approaches with formal story-telling and scripting techniques to author stories in Scratch.

Day two will focus on linking computational thinking approaches with the scientific method to create simple simulations and games in Scratch.

Post 4 08-15-2016: Revised Story Telling with Scratch Work Fair Outline

0. Do Pre-session Survey at https://goo.gl/forms/yPKnJDguEb.

1. An overview of the Work Fair’s Goals and Activities

2. A round table of participant introductions and desired “get outs”

3. Scaffolding Your Teaching: Introduction to Google’s CS First Storytelling resource (https://www.cs-first.com/)
Using CS First to introduce digital story telling techniques and "stealth" computational thinking skills
A Walk Thru of CS First’s intents, resources, structure and utility

4. Exploring the Resource:
Signing up to our Google CS First Club
High Seas Introduction

5. Using CS First approach to script a simple sequential story in Scratch.

6. Beyond Google CS First

Concurrent:
A “parsing” of the Workshop description as a start point for building a glossary of terms

First Key Concept – Digital Storytelling as autonomous, multi-media story telling

Second Key Concept – Computational Thinking as an application of Computing Science problem solving approaches to the wider community

Third Key Concept - Using Computational Thinking approaches to develop a Story Authoring approach

Post 3 08-04-2016 - Original Story Telling with Scratch Work Fair Outline

1. An overview of the Work Fair’s Goals and Activities
2. A round table of participant introductions and desired “get outs”
3. A “parsing” of the Workshop description as a start point for building a glossary of terms
4. First Key Concept – Digital Storytelling as autonomous, multi-media story telling
5. Second Key Concept – Computational Thinking as an application of Computing Science problem solving approaches to the wider community
6. Using Computational Thinking approaches to develop a Story Authoring approach
7. Introduction to Google’s CS First Storytelling resource
8. A Walk Thru of CS First’s intents, resources, structure and utility
9. Using CS First materials to script a simple sequential story in Scratch

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Post 1 in this category - Scratch Resources

I'll be using this category to post resources that support the educational use of Scratch. Given that we looked at Google's CS First Club portal during the workshop I've posted that resource first.

1. Google's CS First Club Portal.
This is a program designed to give students exposure to computer science (CS) education through after-school, in-school, and summer programs. It provides interested teachers and/or community volunteers with the materials they will need to run a "club". The materials:

- are completely free and available online
- are targeted at students in grades 4th-8th (ages 9-14)
- can be tailored to fit your schedule and needs
- involve block-based coding using Scratch and are themed to attract students with varied interests

There is an overview of the resource at https://www.cs-first.com/overview.

There are eight "themes" that one can use in a club. You can explore the themes at https://www.cs-first.com/create

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Post 2 in this category - Core Scratch Resources

Scratch is a visual programming environment from MIT that uses Lego block-like icons to create programs or "scripts" by snapping the various command icons together. This is an excellent computing environment for upper elementary and junior high students and for senior high students with little or no programming background.

There are two flavours of Scratch currently in use: Scratch 1.4 and Scratch 2.0. Scratch 2.0 is in the process of supplanting the earlier version of Scratch but as there is a great deal of “legacy” resource available for Scratch 1.4 it is still a valuable teaching tool.

Information, downloads, samples, tutorials available from the following sites.

Resources from MIT (Scratch’s Home)

- Scratch Portal at http://scratch.mit.edu/
- Scratch Help for new Scratchers at http://scratch.mit.edu/help/
- Scratch Wiki at http://wiki.scratch.mit.edu/wiki/Main_Page
- Scratch 2014 Hour of Code at http://scratch.mit.edu/hoc2014/
- Scratch 1.4 download site at http://scratch.mit.edu/scratch_1.4/
- Scratch 2.0 offline editor download site at http://scratch.mit.edu/scratch2download/

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