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Ladies, if you didn’t already love Whoopi Goldberg (and really, what’s not to love?) you are going to ADORE her after you learn more about the new cannabis product line she is launching with award-winning edibles maker Maya Elisabeth! Their collaboration is called Whoopi & Maya, a San Francisco based medical marijuana company that will focus on producing competitively priced, high quality cannabis-infused salves, balms and edibles designed to relieve menstrual pain and...
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http://www.hopegrown.org/blog/whoopi-maya-launching-line-of-medical-cannabis-products-menstrual-pain-relief

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1/12/16
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A former ICU nurse explains how she became a medical marijuana proponent after seeing its miraculous effects on her own patients...

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http://www.hopegrown.org/blog/understanding-your-body-relationship-with-cannabis

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We are excited to bring you our ongoing educational series on the health benefits of medical marijuana. Enjoy and have a fabulous weekend!

The cannabis, or marijuana, plant has a number of chemical compounds, eighty-five and counting, that are secreted by its flowers. These compounds, known as cannabinoids, have shown to be powerfully effective on symptoms of chronic conditions...
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http://www.hopegrown.org/blog/understanding-medical-marijuana

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High blood pressure or hypertension is a condition in which the force of a person’s blood against their artery walls is higher than normal and therefore likely to lead to a host of other problems. Although high blood pressure that occurs without symptoms often goes unnoticed, the body can only compensate for unhealthy blood pressure for a limited amount of time. Left uncontrolled, high blood pressure can lead to heart attack, stroke, heart failure, vision loss, and poor kidney functioning, all without much warning.

The general research pipeline for investigating a new area of medicine tends to flow from test tube, to rodents, and lastly to humans. Genetically modified rodents are expensive to create and time-consuming to maintain, so preliminary assays are usually first performed on the cells in question outside normal living conditions (such as in a test tube or Petri dish). In this area, cannabinoids have been established as consistent vasodilators, meaning that they cause blood vessels (such as arteries and veins) to expand, thereby decreasing blood pressure. To understand this effect, imagine the force of water spraying from a garden hose. As the size of the opening narrows, the jet of water shoots further. Just like the garden hose, often the cause of high blood pressure is the buildup of clotting molecules and fat inside of arteries, which decreases the area for blood to flow through and therefore increases blood pressure.

Unfortunately, while this vasodillation effect has been observed in numerous cell preparations, the community is still debating the cause. Anandamide, which is one of the body’s natural cannabinoids, is the most popular target molecule for research. Since anandamide is naturally produced by the body and has also been shown to influence blood pressure, the general consensus is that releasing ananamide is one of the ways in which the body regulates blood pressure. However, some research groups believe that anandamide has special receptors on blood vessel walls. Others believe that the vasodillation effects are mediated by CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Still others claim the pathway is through anandamide bonding with vanilloid receptors. This is currently the reigning view and appears most likely.

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http://cornerstonecollective.com/can-cannabis-lower-blood-pressure/

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At Cornerstone, we talk frequently about dosing, not just because it’s important to members, but also because it’s important to us. The end goal is for every patient to experience the maximum benefit of medical cannabis. Although it seems tempting to think that more medicine always means more healing, that’s just not the reality of how cannabinoids are processed in the body. In truth the body’s response is much more complex. Exhibit A: This is a graph that illustrates anti-inflammatory properties of cannabidiol (CBD) at various doses...

“Synergy” is one of those phrases that boomed in 90’s corporate culture and then almost as abruptly passed out of usage.  The concept, however, stayed relevant because it has real merit; synergy is the idea that two things working together could be more effective than both working separately. Likewise, CBD is known to be the main source of the anti-inflammatory properties of cannabis. Yet as seen in this study, CBD alone is not necessarily the most effective at treating pain or inflammation. This means that somehow other cannabinoids or chemicals in the 202 extract are changing the way that CBD is being processed by the body. On the one hand, this is frustrating, because we’re still running tests on organic combinations that cannot easily be standardized. It’s impossible to know with these kinds of tests what effects are coming from where. On the other hand, this is also a reason for hope, because it means that the interactions between cannabinoids are worth studying and may offer insight into how to create better medicines for the future.

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http://cornerstonecollective.com/whole-plant-cbd-more-effective-than-pure-cbd/

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CNN’s chief medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta is back with even more revelations in medical marijuana with his latest television special, “Weed 3: The Marijuana Revolution.”

After scratching the surface of medical cannabis and examining the lives of families who need it, Gupta will now give viewers an insider’s look at the politics behind medical marijuana research.

“Weed 3″ will focus on the efforts of the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), whose researcher Dr. Sue Sisley will finally begin a study on marijuana’s effect on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, only after a series of bureaucratic setbacks.

Dr. Gupta, a vocal supporter of the legalization of medical marijuana, asks Obama in the documentary if he supports the goals of a historic Senate bill introduced in March that seeks to make several major changes in federal law, including drastically reducing the federal government's ability to crack down on state-legal medical marijuana programs, encouraging more research into the plant and reclassifying marijuana as a less dangerous drug.

"You know, I think I'd have to take a look at the details," Obama began in response, "but I'm on record as saying that not only do I think carefully prescribed medical use of marijuana may in fact be appropriate and we should follow the science as opposed to ideology on this issue, but I'm also on record as saying that the more we treat some of these issues related to drug abuse from a public health model and not just from an incarceration model, the better off we're going to be."


https://video.search.yahoo.com/video/play;_ylt=A2KIo.CLGzlV41kAEfAsnIlQ;_ylu=X3oDMTByZ2N0cmxpBHNlYwNzcgRzbGsDdmlkBHZ0aWQDBGdwb3MDMg--?p=medical+marijuana+sanjay+gupta+documentary&vid=6c420fad7fa3b347e3b5f0fee57dc3b0&l=41%3A58&turl=http%3A%2F%2Fts4.mm.bing.net%2Fth%3Fid%3DVR.6879751983039%26pid%3D15.1&rurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DpOQSnbqdRFY&tit=CNN+-+WEED+3+-+A+Marijuana+Revolution+-+A+Dr+Sanjay+Gupta+Documentary&c=1&sigr=11b0oj8nb&sigt=125tab0oe&sigi=11mahd8oj&age=1429578959&fr2=p%3As%2Cv%3Av&fr=yhs-mozilla-002&hsimp=yhs-002&hspart=mozilla&tt=b

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The purpose of the CMCR, according to its website, “is to coordinate rigorous scientific studies to assess the safety and efficacy of cannabis and cannabis compounds for treating medical conditions. The funding of the CMCR is the result of SB-847, passed by the State Legislature and signed into law by Governor Gray Davis.” For those who don’t know, Gray Davis was the governor of California (from 1999-2003) when the CMCR began. Let that sink in. While we’re reminiscing, let’s remember that the citizens of California overwhelming passed Proposition 215 way back in 1996. Nearly 20 years ago, we told our “powers that be” how we feel about medical cannabis, and still, to this very day, they are denying the rights of patients.

At the helm of the CMCR is neuropsychiatrist, Igor Grant, M.D., Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. Dr. Grant, along with a team of scientists from throughout the UC system, conducted a series of human trials to determine the efficacy of cannabis in treatment of pain, specifically neuropathic pain associated with conditions such as AIDS, cancer, Multiple Sclerosis and diabetes. The sample materials (aka the cannabis) were supplied by the University of Mississippi, the sole federally sanctioned cannabis farm in the United States. To participants, the samples all appeared to be the same, however, some test subjects were given placebos. Basically, they were given hemp to smoke, which we all know does not result in a “high.” Its appearance and flavor though, is close enough to fool unsuspecting subjects.

Not surprisingly, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) spent an inordinate amount of time second-guessing Dr. Grant, his methods and his materials. Inane questioning abounded, but quickly subsided. Funding envy, perhaps?

Once the bureaucratic hurdles had been cleared, the good doctor was able to conduct his work. He admits that he went into the experiment expecting mixed results. Quite to the contrary though, “Every single study showed benefit,” said Dr. Grant. He went on to say, “The convergence of evidence makes me convinced there is a medical benefit here, and there may be a niche for cannabis. It is intellectually dishonest to say it has no value whatsoever, because it's just not true.” Furthermore, his study found that cannabis’ current federal classification and the political controversy that surrounds it are “obstacles to medical progress.”

On the subject of the classification of cannabis, Dr. Grant has this to say, “It's completely incongruous that it's sitting in Schedule 1 with useless, dangerous drugs."  According to Grant, there is more than enough evidence to justify rescheduling cannabis, and he is in good company, regarding that opinion. The American Academy of Pediatrics has called for rescheduling, and U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy has publicly acknowledged that cannabis is helpful in treating certain conditions.

In addition to the plethora of scientific proof provided by Dr. Igor Grant, we can all put our collective heads together, use common sense and acknowledge that cannabis is not a harmful “drug,” but rather an invaluable source of healing.

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http://ireadculture.com/article-5332-san-diego-ca-is-a-beachside-epicenter-for-medical-cannabis-research.html?utm_content=buffer7a7bd&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer
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