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collapsable boat
3 Photos - View album

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Oreo wrapped in brownie topped with a chocolate chip cookie - genius. Thank you Lisa.

And the pecan stuff was good too, thanks Mark.
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Need to turn a small piece at the Maker Space, here's and Idea:

http://www.instructables.com/id/Drill-Press-Lathe/

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Here is a good video for anyone who uses the bench grinder.  I probably would not be posting this had I had not been sitting in the classroom at shop and heard a shotgun go off.  It wasn't a shotgun, it was the grinding wheel exploding.  The student did not ring test the new wheel and it flew apart when it got up to speed.  He was ok, minor scratches, but his safety glasses where demolished.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NDtL4gisZYo

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Tonight we looked at the back of the Avid chasis and seeing the XLR connectors labeled LTC.  This is linear time code (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linear_timecode).  Each video frame gets it's own time stamp.  Time code can be written in the video frame or an audio channel running along side video channel.  Think of a piece of VHS tape.  Most of the tape is used by the video signal that is placed in discontinuous chunks by striping it at an angle by a spinning head, at the bottom edge the audio channels are placed in a linear fashion by a static head (stack).  This is basically a straight audio signal, like on a audio cassette tape.  

Time information for each video frame is recorded on the audio channel.  Since this is basically an AM signal it is prone to noise or crosstalk.  An XLR connection is used where one pin is ground, the signal is send on a second pin and the signal is inverted and sent on the third pin.  The receiving piece of equipment inverts the signal on the third pin adds it to the signal on the second pin thus canceling any noise picked up along the length of the wire, such as sixty cycle hum.    The two wire protocol is commonly used for microphones, since the signal generated by the mic is very small.

I would expect the timecode signal, being an audio signal in this case to be 1 volt peak, which in and of itself should give a pretty good signal to noise ratio.  But the timecode and black burst signals are often distributed and daisy chained to dozens of pieces of equipment, each connection a good place to introduce more noise and the signal is attenuated 6db  so it would make sense to use a noise canceling technique (I am guessing).

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Dear Make Lehigh Valley,

    Thank you for a great open hack night. Having access to the right tools for the job makes it easier and a pleasing experience.
It was good meeting everyone last night.

    A special thanks to Dr. Jim Green for getting me started, Jeff Minton and Tom for assisting me through the night.

    Below are the two pieces of aluminum I cut, and the 3 aluminum pieces I drilled. This is picture is of a test fit, and it looks like my daughters we be assembling this module today and inserting it into our cloud chamber.

Grace and Peace,
Bob Floyd
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Check out the latest progress on Frank's Filament Extruder. 

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Our friend Kyle is looking to fund a coding sprint for his amazing RTL-SDR software. Check it out, send a few bucks his way and get a say in what features get added to the software.

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/a-month-of-rtl-sdr 
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