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Travellers will discover the true meaning of “Lao PDR” once they experience the laid-back lifestyle that this beautiful country offers; Lao – Please Don’t Rush.

Laos is often overshadowed by its more popular neighbours. But this landlocked territory with unlimited waterways, dense forests, stone megaliths, extensive limestone cave systems, Khmer Hindu temple complexes and arguably the most laid-back people in Southeast Asia has so much to offer that it is rapidly becoming a prime destination for those seeking true off-the-beaten path experiences.


http://www.asiaforexpats.com/destinations-asia/laos/
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Luang Prabang is a UNESCO-protected city located in north central Laos, approximately 300 km north of the capital Vientiane. Formerly known as Muang Sua, then Xieng Dong and later Chiang Thong this city has a long history of occupations, dynasties, kingdoms and war conflicts.


http://www.asiaforexpats.com/holidays/luang-prabang/
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Once Laos’ main party destination, Vang Vieng has shifted its focus from a rowdy backpackers’ hub to an outdoor activities town. The city was originally settled as a staging post between Luang Prabang and Vientiane. Major improvements to the town’s infrastructure were made during the Vietnam War with the construction of a US Air Force base and a airstrip.


http://www.asiaforexpats.com/holidays/vang-vieng/
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Vientiane is the capital and largest city of Laos. It is located on the banks of the Mekong River near the border with Thailand. This laidback city was an important administrative centre of the Kingdom of the Million Elephants (Lan Xang), it became the capital of the French protectorate of Laos and kept its primary status after its independence in 1953 and even after the communist revolution in 1975.


http://www.asiaforexpats.com/holidays/vientiane/
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Nong Khiaw is a small rustic town located in Luang Prabang province, north Laos. Located on the banks of the Ou River and surrounded by stunning limestone mountains, the town offers, amazing landscapes, waterfalls, caves and an authentic glimpse into Laos quiet rural lifestyle. The town’s surroundings offer opportunities for rock-climbing, boat trips, trekking, cycling and caving.


http://www.asiaforexpats.com/holidays/nong-khiaw/
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In the southern region of Champasak Province the Mekong River flows through a riverine archipelago which name is Laotian means “The 4000 Islands”. Si Phan Don is a labyrinth of islets, rocks and sandbars located just above the border with Cambodia. A very laid-back atmosphere and infinity of waterways permeate the area, giving room to activities like swimming, tubing, boat cruises, kayaking and cycling.


http://www.asiaforexpats.com/holidays/si-phan-don/
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Champasak Province has a long history and fine heritage as a former centre of power in the region and a former kingdom ruling part of the remains of Lane Xang. About 30 years ago Champasak Town, the provincial capital was a seat of royalty; something difficult to imagine as nowadays it is a sleepy town, almost too relaxed even for Laos standards. With its colonial mansions, wooden houses, Chinese-style shopfronts and surprisingly good spas a visit to town is a relaxing must-do.


http://www.asiaforexpats.com/holidays/champasak/
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After the destruction of the old Xieng Khouang (nowadays Muang Khoun) during the Second Indochina War, Phonsavanh was built in the late 1970s to replace the dismantled city. The area was one of the most heavily bombed in the country, being Laos the most heavily bombed country in the world. Nowadays the locals use bomb casings and other remains to resourcefully build fences, parts of their houses, fireplaces and tools.
The countryside surrounding Phonsavanh is a beautiful hilly area that during and after the wet season is covered with green grass and pine trees, very different from the rest of Laos. Perhaps what makes Phonsavan popular nowadays in the fascinating Plain of Jars, an area in the centre of Xieng Khuang littered with large ancient stone vessels believed to be ancient funerary urns. The origin of these giant jars is unclear and the mystery has sparkled international debate.


http://www.asiaforexpats.com/holidays/phonsavan/
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