Modern stoic ethics and practices
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Are you in #business? Then you should be into #stoicism.
Want to be calm under pressure? Want people to trust you? Want self-mastery?Want the confidence that comes with a solid grounding in ethics? Of course you do. And that means you should be a stoic.For those unfamiliar with stoicism, the word may imply unfeeling, stonefaced or free from emotion. A stoic, however, feels deeply, but is in control of these emotions as they have accepted the limits of their own power and have therefore achieved a degre...
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Greg Milner's profile photoCharles Rathmann's profile photo
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Thanks for the comment, Greg. Indeed, this situation is somewhat paradoxical as noted. You may also want to delve into the writings of Cicero, who stressed that in order to have things like minerals from mines and other commodities important for life, that people need to act in their self interest and be rewarded for generating these goods. Call yourself anti-capitalist if you like, but the stoic position on the role of ethics and virtue in proper commerce is well documented.

Thanks again!
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I read a review of a book about moss and it started a long string of Stoic thoughts. Weird, right?
I've been thinking about moss this evening. Moss covers much of my backyard and I love that it does. I think it's beautiful. I'm happy to now live in Portland, a city weighed down by a green blanket of the stuff. I'm thinking of moss because of a book review I recently read. I may be purchasing the book, Gathering Moss: A Natural and Cultural History of Mosses, out of interest in the subject and respect for the writing as sampled in the...
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Boy, you can tell you've moved to PDX, blogging about moss. :-)  Wait until you slip on it in your driveway and get a pancake size bruise on your butt. That'll take some Stoic resilience to deal with (while you're on the way to Lowe's to get some Moss-be-Gone). I guess that's why people in the northwest are sometimes called "mossbacks." 

Now you need to think of what you'll write about molds, with which I am sure you are becoming way too familiar. 

I miss Portland sometimes. 
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Greg Milner
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The ancient Greeks believed that many aspects of a person’s life were determined by the three mythical women known as Fates. These were three sister goddesses that appeared in Greek and Roman mythology and were believed to have “spun out” a child’s destiny at birth. They determined when life began, when it ended, and everything in between. At the birth of each man they appeared spinning, measuring, and cutting the thread of life. However not everything was inflexible or pre-determined. A man destined to become a great warrior one day could still choose what he wanted to do on any given day. The gods could simply intervene with decisions that could be helpful or harmful. In a sense, they controlled the metaphorical life of every mortal born.
The ancient Greeks believed that many aspects of a person’s life were determined by the three mythical women known as Fates.  These were three sister goddesses that appeared in Greek and Roman mythology and were believed to have “spun out” a child’s desti
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Adam Fullerton
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Any Gotham fans? The last episode they talked about Marcus Aurelius and how stoicism is a life philosophy. Kind of cool what it leads Bruce Wayne to find. I won't spoil it but check it out. 
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It's on Fox Monday nights. If you get hulu, I know it's on there. 
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Adam Fullerton
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A new TED talk on YouTube. I thought it was interesting that a lot of what he describes is stoicism but he never calls it that.
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Greg Milner
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New blog post
My Early Religious Training I was raised High-Church Episcopalian, Catholicism Lite -- all the ritual, none of the guilt. It was an easy introduction to God, morality, spirituality, such as it was, and for adults apparentl...
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Greg Milner
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Greg Milner
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BBC Documentary of the Week
A Brief History of Anger: 13 Mar 15
Fri, 13 Mar 15
Duration:
57 mins 

American satirist Joe Queenan follows up his Brief Histories of Irony and Blame with A Brief History of Anger - spats, tantrums and explosions from the archive. Good anger, bad anger, creative anger, and the occasional childish moment caught on microphone.
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Greg Milner
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From the same folks who brought you The Philosopher's Mail. 
Nowadays, almost all of us wish we could be calmer. It’s one of the distinctive longings of the modern age. Across history, people have tended to seek out adventure and excitement. But most of us have had a bit too much of that now. The desire to be more tranquil and focused is the new, ever more
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Greg Milner
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In episode 9 we interview political scientist Michael Baranowski [38:30]. LInks mentioned in this episode: How to be a Stoic – Massimo Pigliucci's blog [03:27]; Stoicism Today – Painted Porch mentioned on Stoicism Today blog [4:27]; Stoic Camp – University of Wyoming [04:45]; Pathological Giving ...
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Greg Milner
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From 1965, I think. 
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Greg Milner
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New blog post. 
Most people who read The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius either slog through Book 1, or just skip it altogether. After all, who really wants to read "From Fronto, I learned not to throw scrolls at slaves. From Gluteus Maximus,...
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Greg Milner
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I like catching +Gregory B. Sadler lectures when I can and this looks like a good one. 
 
Here's the video of the session last weekend on Stoic Philosophy and Anger -- as usual, an excellent and stimulating discussion #Stoicism #anger  
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No, thank YOU!
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Greg Milner
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+Matthew Van Natta has a new one out. Check it out. They just keep getting better. 
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Fantastic. 
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Greg Milner
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New Painted Porch podcast is out. 
In episode 8 we respond to some recent heavy drama on the forums and blogosphere about whether or not believe in God is necessary for someone to be a Stoic. LInks mentioned in this episode: Good Fortune – Matt's new podcast; Starting Out with Stoicism – Kirsten Johnson's new blog ...
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Greg Milner
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Another podcast from Mr. Matt!
Episode 2 is here. This week I cover how to start the day as a Stoic. I discuss morning meditations derived from Marcus Aurelius and Seneca as well as explain the Stoic exercise called the View from Above. As always, positive reviews on iTunes are needed (because it helps other potential listeners find the podcast) and appreciated (because it's kind of you, and gives me a warm and fuzzy feeling). Shares, retweets and such are, of cour...
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Greg Milner
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Hey! Get your Plotinus on!


Neoplatonism
In Our Time
Thu, 19 Apr 12

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss Neoplatonism, the school of thought founded in the 3rd century AD by the philosopher Plotinus. Born in Egypt, Plotinus was brought up in the Platonic tradition, studying and reinterpreting the works of the Greek thinker Plato. After he moved to Rome Plotinus became the most influential member of a group of thinkers dedicated to Platonic scholarship. The Neoplatonists - a term only coined in the nineteenth century - brought a new religious sensibility to bear on Plato's thought. They outlined a complex cosmology which linked the human with the divine, headed by a mysterious power which they called the One. Neoplatonism shaped early Christian, Jewish and Muslim religious scholarship, and remained a dominant force in European thought until the Renaissance. With:Angie HobbsAssociate Professor of Philosophy and Senior Fellow in the Public Understanding of Philosophy at the University of WarwickPeter AdamsonProfessor of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy at King's College LondonAnne SheppardProfessor of Ancient Philosophy at Royal Holloway, University of LondonProducer: Thomas Morris.
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Greg Milner
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No time like the present to start thinking about it. 
 
How do you want to die? Meet the movement on a mission to make death part of popular conversation
A growing national movement to normalize end-of-life discussions among family and friends has gained traction in recent months. As Medicare considers whether to cover such conversations with physicians, The Conversation Project, a Boston-based non-profit, is highlighting the importance of talking openly about dying. Special Correspondent Lynn Sherr reports.
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Greg Milner
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New Painted Porch episode. 
In episode 7 we have an interview with Erik Wiegardt [43:30] about the Society of Epictetus. Also we discuss the Tablet of Thebes [17:20] and commonplace books [29:45]. LInks mentioned in this episode: Steven Umbrello's blog and podcast Stoically Speaking; Steven Umbrello's article on ...
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