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Chandra Reveals the Elementary Nature of Cassiopeia A, Cas A.

A new Chandra image shows the location of several elements produced by the explosion of a massive star. Cassiopeia A is a well-known supernova remnant located about 11,000 light years from Earth. Supernova remnants and the elements they produce are very hot — millions of degrees — and glow strongly in X-ray light. Chandra's sharp X-ray vision allows scientists to determine both the amount and location of these crucial elements objects like Cas A produce.

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A smiling lens.

You can make out two orange eyes and a white button nose. In the case of this “happy face”, the two eyes are the galaxies SDSSCGB 8842.3 and SDSSCGB 8842.4 and the misleading smile lines are actually arcs caused by an effect known as strong gravitational lensing.

Credit: NASA & ESA Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt (geckzilla.org)
A smiling lens.
A smiling lens.
manuelastronomo.wordpress.com

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Two different looks to the Sombrero Galaxy.
Two different looks to the Sombrero Galaxy.
Two different looks to the Sombrero Galaxy.
manuelastronomo.wordpress.com

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A collection of ancient stars.

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has produced this beautiful image of the globular cluster Messier 56 (also known as M 56 or NGC 6779), which is located about 33 000 light years away from the Earth in the constellation of Lyra (The Lyre). The cluster is composed of a large number of stars, tightly bound to each other by gravity.
Credit: NASA & ESA Acknowledgement: Gilles Chapdelaine.
A collection of ancient stars.
A collection of ancient stars.
manuelastronomo.wordpress.com

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Dying star creates fantasy-like sculpture of gas and dust.

Dying star creates fantasy-like sculpture of gas and dust. In this detailed view from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, the so-called Cat's Eye Nebula looks like the penetrating eye of the disembodied sorcerer Sauron from the film adaptation of "Lord of the Rings." The nebula, formally catalogued NGC 6543, is every bit as inscrutable as the J.R.R. Tolkien phantom character. Although the Cat's Eye Nebula was among the first planetary nebula ever to be discovered, it is one of the most complex planetary nebulae ever seen in space. A planetary nebula forms when Sun-like stars gently eject their outer gaseous layers to form bright nebulae with amazing twisted shapes.

Credit: ESA, NASA, HEIC and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA).

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My new blog of astronomy in english.
My new astronomy blog in English. For all those followers that I have that speak the language of Shakespeare.
Most detailed image of the Crab Nebula.
Most detailed image of the Crab Nebula.
manuelastronomo.wordpress.com

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NGC 1672: Barred Spiral Galaxy from Hubble.
Image Credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, NASA, ESA; Processing & Copyright: Domingo Pestana & Raul Villaverde

Many spiral galaxies have bars across their centers. Even our own Milky Way Galaxy is thought to have a modest central bar. Prominently barred spiral galaxy NGC 1672, featured here, was captured in spectacular detail in an image taken by the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. Visible are dark filamentary dust lanes, young clusters of bright blue stars, red emission nebulas of glowing hydrogen gas, a long bright bar of stars across the center, and a bright active nucleus that likely houses a supermassive black hole. Light takes about 60 million years to reach us from NGC 1672, which spans about 75,000 light years across. NGC 1672, which appears toward the constellation of the Dolphinfish (Dorado), is being studied to find out how a spiral bar contributes to star formation in a galaxy's central regions.

For more information follow the links below:
https://eluniversodemanu.blogspot.com/2018/06/ngc-1672-una-galaxia-espiral-barrada.html
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap181009.html
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The Lonely Neutron Star in Supernova Remnant E0102-72.3.

Credit: X-ray (NASA/CXC/ESO/F. Vogt et al.); Optical (ESO/VLT/MUSE & NASA/STScI)

Why is this neutron star off-center? Recently a lone neutron star has been found within the debris left over from an old supernova explosion. The "lonely neutron star" in question is the blue dot at the center of the red nebula near the bottom left of E0102-72.3. In the featured image composite, blue represents X-ray light captured by NASA's Chandra Observatory, while red and green represent optical light captured by ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile and NASA's Hubble Space Telescope in orbit. The displaced position of this neutron star is unexpected since the dense star is thought to be the core of the star that exploded in the supernova and created the outer nebula. It could be that the neutron star in E0102 was pushed away from the nebula's center by the supernova itself, but then it seems odd that the smaller red ring remains centered on the neutron star. Alternatively, the outer nebula could have been expelled during a different scenario -- perhaps even involving another star. Future observations of the nebulas and neutron star appear likely to resolve the situation.

For more information follow the links of my blog in spanish:
https://eluniversodemanu.blogspot.com/2017/03/e0102-723-una-nueva-dimension-una.html
https://eluniversodemanu.blogspot.com/2018/05/los-astronomos-detectan-una-estrella-de.html
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Making Head or Tail of a Galactic Landscape.

• Abell 2142 is a galaxy cluster that is 6 million light years across and contains hundreds of galaxies.
• Chandra data reveal a galaxy group, consisting of a handful of galaxies, that is plummeting into Abell 2142.
• Behind this descending galaxy group is a long tail of X-ray emission made up of million-degree gas.
• This X-ray tail helps astronomers better understand how these giant galactic systems evolve.

Credit X-ray: NASA/CXC/Univ. of Geneva, D. Eckert. Optical: SDSS provided by CDS through Aladin.

More information:
https://eluniversodemanu.blogspot.com/2018/09/hacer-la-cabeza-o-la-cola-de-un-paisaje.html

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M33: Triangulum Galaxy.

Image Credit & Copyright: Christoph Kaltseis, CEDIC

The small, northern constellation Triangulum harbors this magnificent face-on spiral galaxy, M33. Its popular names include the Pinwheel Galaxy or just the Triangulum Galaxy. M33 is over 50,000 light-years in diameter, third largest in the Local Group of galaxies after the Andromeda Galaxy (M31), and our own Milky Way. About 3 million light-years from the Milky Way, M33 is itself thought to be a satellite of the Andromeda Galaxy and astronomers in these two galaxies would likely have spectacular views of each other's grand spiral star systems. As for the view from planet Earth, this sharp image shows off M33's blue star clusters and pinkish star forming regions along the galaxy's loosely wound spiral arms. In fact, the cavernous NGC 604 is the brightest star forming region, seen here at about the 7 o'clock position from the galaxy center. Like M31, M33's population of well-measured variable stars have helped make this nearby spiral a cosmic yardstick for establishing the distance scale of the Universe.

More informatoion on my blog in spanish:
https://eluniversodemanu.blogspot.com/
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