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The Blackness that the Caucasians get by basking in the sun is temporary, for as soon as he or she quits basking, that person starts getting paler. But it is different with the Ethiopian; all Blacklist is inherit from the Sun, that is, how being the sun's original offspring. In other words, he said I would protect our skin is black because, like the sun we Ethiopians have in our reproductive system and Marrow of our bones what called the SUN HEAT GENES, in these Sun Heat Genes become part of the blood and they emanate outward to the skin, and our Sun Heat Genes burn the skin BLACK. The more bEING SUPERIOR in color, because THE SUNS other universes are JET BLACK, and they are superior to all other Universal bodies. Hence, black is not only beautiful but also the best and purest of THE COLORS. The sun is male and Mother Earth is female. The sun gives off either in the form of what is called PROMINENCES. The SUN has antenna called GRANULATION, and Ethiopians'wooly hair looks like that granulation. So I'll woolly have me correctly be called granulation (using an English expression). If one puts a straight strand of hair closer and closer to a fire, that strand of hair will granulate, that is, ball luck because of the potency of the Heat. The Ethiopian carries his and her SUN Within, and we appeared on planet Earth at a time with no other race could survive in the Earth's atmosphere, because just after Creations the atmosphere was too dense and poaching for the weakness of human beings called MANDKIND. Mankind it's all peoples with straight hair by Nature. The Ethiopian became identified with mankind down through evolution.

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-Do you remember this?

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Been spending and volunteering time at the local library due to the influx of people escaping the Hurricane.

This is an experience & practice I will continue for years to come.

However, these last few days have been somewhat lonely.

Where,
oh where,
are my fellow Black Nationalists?

They are conspicuously absent.
With all the various "Blacker Than Thou" cards so many of them carry, are they missing on [or unaware of] the value of a simple "Library Card?"

Libraries contain a fortress of Black Gold.
One needs to search no further for the pathway to Nation building.

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Scipio Africanus Jones was a prominent Arkansas African American defense attorney in the late 19th and early 20th century.  He opposed Arkansas’s Jim Crow laws and successfully argued cases before the United States Supreme Court between 1913 and 1925.  Known for his pro bono work for impoverished African American defendants, Jones became the leading attorney in Arkansas for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

In 1901, Jones argued two important civil rights cases before the Arkansas Supreme Court.  In both cases, Jones objected to the all-white composition of the juries.  In one case the Court overturned a lower court’s conviction.  In the second case the court ruled that there was no discrimination in jury selection.  Despite the mixed outcome Jones quickly emerged as the leading black attorney in Arkansas.  

In 1905, Jones won a court fight that exposed the unfairness of the convict labor system.  Convicts worked for fifty cents a day and were charged for each day they could not work, and their sentences would be extended to cover days lost from work.  As a result of Jones’ victory, the convicts received seventy-five cents a day, regardless of whether they worked or not.

Jones was an active member of the Arkansas Republican Party, leading the “Black and Tan” faction which fought for two decades with the party’s “lily white” faction which attempted to exclude African Americans.  Jones was an elected delegate to the National Republican Conventions of 1908 and 1912.

In 1915, Scipio Africanus Jones was elected to be a special judge for the Little Rock Municipal Court to preside over a court case that involved a black defendant.  This case was the first instance in Little Rock in which an African American presided as a special judge. #BlackHistory
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From Zinn Education Project. On September 13, 1858, 18-year-old John Price was arrested by a federal marshal in Oberlin, Ohio under the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 (Price had escaped from a Kentucky enslaver a few years before.) As soon as Oberlin residents heard of the marshal's actions, a group of them went to Wellington where Price was being held. After peaceful negotiations failed, they stormed the hotel, found Price, and took him to freedom in Canada in what became known as the Oberlin–Wellington Rescue. (It is not known what happened to Price after he arrived in Canada.) Thirty-seven of the abolitionists involved in the rescue were arrested for violating the Fugitive Slave Law. Learn more in the picture book, "The Price of Freedom": http://bit.ly/1EVABzn Learn about some of the abolitionists involved in the action here: http://bit.ly/1f9U2GF #blackhistory
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"You may expel us, gentlemen, but I firmly believe that you will some day repent it. The Black man cannot protect a country, if the country doesn't protect him; and if, tomorrow, a war should arise, I would not raise a musket to defend a country where my manhood is denied. The fashionable way in Georgia, when hard work is to be done, is for the white man to sit at his ease while the Black man does the work; but, sir, I will say this much to the colored men of Georgia, as, if I should be killed in this campaign, I may have no opportunity of telling them at any other time: Never lift a finger nor raise a hand in defense of Georgia, until Georgia acknowledges that you are men and invests you with the rights pertaining to manhood." -- Henry McNeal Turner on 9/3/1868 on being one of 24 African American representatives expelled from the Georgia Legislature. Listen to excerpt of speech read by Danny Glover from Voices of a People's History of the United States and see a link to his full speech: http://bit.ly/14fH9X0 Here are more resources for teaching about the Reconstruction era of the United States: http://bit.ly/1N540Ij #TeachReconstruction #blackhistory
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Rita Dove, the first African American and youngest person to be named US Poet Laureate. She was born in Akron, Ohio August 28th in 1952 and named a Presidential Scholar at one of the top 100 high schools in the country. Dove then attended Miami University in Ohio as a National Merit Scholar. After graduating in 1973 Dove was awarded a Fulbright to study in Germany at the University of Tubingen. She then earned her MFA from the University of Iowa in 1977. Dove published her first poetry collection in 1980 entitled The Yellow House on the Corner. Many of her works have won awards including a Pulitzer Prize for the verse-novel Thomas and Beulah. In 1993 Dove was named US Poet Laureate, and was the first African American and youngest person to hold the position. Then in 1996 Dove won a National Humanities Medal. Photo Credit: Fred Viebahn #womenshistory #blackhistory
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