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"West does remarkably well as a writer, making a complicated world seem simple. He uses pictures and diagrams to explain the facts, with a leisurely text to put the facts into their proper setting, and no equations. There are many digressions, expressing personal opinions and telling stories that give a commonsense meaning to scientific conclusions. The text and the pictures could probably be understood and enjoyed by a bright ten-year-old or by a not-so-bright grandparent."

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How many of these books are on your book self?

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Attending an interesting virtual conference where Mauro Copelli gave a presentation of how speech graphic can be used as a diagnostic tool. Here is one of his groups research papers on the subject.

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In the modern world there is an increasing number of countries which have elections but no democracies. They pretend to be a democracy, but they are not. Fascism comes along today not with torches, flags and public violence, but rather quiet as a thief and disguised as a democracy, accompanied by propaganda which is so powerful that it creates a distorted reality.

Via +Michael Chui​​​​​
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There are images that come to mind when we imagine a democracy’s end. Democracies fall in coups and revolutions, burn in fires and riots, collapse amid war and plague. When they die, they die screaming.

Not anymore, argue Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt in their new book, _How Democracies Die._ In most modern cases, “democracies erode slowly, in barely visible steps.” They rot from the inside, poisoned by leaders who “subvert the very process that brought them to power.” They are hollowed out, the trappings of democracy present long after the soul of the system is snuffed out.
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"Human social networks are overwhelmingly homophilous: individuals tend to befriend others who are similar to them in terms of a range of physical attributes (e.g., age, gender). Do similarities among friends reflect deeper similarities in how we perceive, interpret, and respond to the world? To test whether friendship, and more generally, social network proximity, is associated with increased similarity of real-time mental responding, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to scan subjects’ brains during free viewing of naturalistic movies. Here we show evidence for neural homophily: neural responses when viewing audiovisual movies are exceptionally similar among friends, and that similarity decreases with increasing distance in a real-world social network. These results suggest that we are exceptionally similar to our friends in how we perceive and respond to the world around us, which has implications for interpersonal influence and attraction."

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After Steven Pinker​ has explained us where regular and irregular verbs come from in his book "Words and Rules", here are the origins of the two words for tea explained in a nice map.The rule is simple: tea if by sea, chai if by land (which means "Chai Tea" is redundant like "Sahara Desert")

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Does the MIW (Many Interacting Worlds) theory make sense? :-/
The Many Interacting Worlds hypothesis, the or MIW hypothesizes that a plethora of universes have always existed side by side, and that they subtly influence the ones near them to differ from themselves. The bizarre effects of quantum mechanics that we observe and are confused by, such as quantum tunneling and the double slit experiment, are really caused by the interactions between these universes.

The hypothesis says the probabilistic nature we ascribe to certain events is really uncertainty caused by our not knowing which universe we are in, and that if we knew where we were physics would again be deterministic. The authors of the study say as little as two existent universes would be enough to assure quantum effects take place. They show they can account for basic quantum phenomena using their ideas.

What makes this model different from the others?

First, it “contains nothing that corresponds to the mysterious quantum wave function,” except when the number of modeled universes is infinite. When the model contains only one universe, it simplifies to a classical, Newtonian system.

Another key difference is that the proposed words in this hypothesis interact with one another. Because of this, scientists could devise an experiment to show if the predicted interaction was taking place; supporting or disproving the hypothesis. Since science typically holds falsifiability to be a gold standard, this is a great leap forward for quantum theory.

via +David Fuchs

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Obama administration: let's find a cure for cancer
Trump administration: let's find a McDonald's because we might get poisoned and watch Fox News all day
excellent article from my colleague, Sui Huang.
Why is cancer treatment a double-edged sword?

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"In his Foundation series, Asimov posited the concept of “psychohistory”, which, within this fictional world, used complex equations to predict the overall shape of future human history."

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This is an important paradigm shift. This ads an ability or capacity for "The Machine" to learn from its own experience and makes the machine accountable to itself.
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