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Singlet fission technology will boost solar efficiency by 30%
It's improving little by little
Via: +CleanTechnica 

#solarpower #environment #solarpanels #renewableenergy  
Scientists were pretty excited when they discovered you could convert light energy directly into electricity by capturing photons in semiconductors, exciting them into “excitons” (bound electron with negative charge and hole with positive), and capturing the resultant current through electrodes. Now a group of four chemists from the University of California, Riverside, has worked out a
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Is it possible to use solar panels to run a compressor to compress air that can efficiently run a generator to produce power. Some what of equivalence to that of lead acid battery backup

Any one who can ponder of this thought can revolutionise power back technology into the most greenest substitute to all energy form


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Infinia solar dish.

Uses concentrated light to heat and power a stirling generator.
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S.L Ong's profile photoariel talli's profile photo
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The European Photovoltaic Industry Association has just published its “Global Market Outlook for Photovoltaics 2014-2018” report. The report includes solar photovoltaic market figures for 2013 and a forecast for the 2014-2018 period. http://bit.ly/TUY5gW
The European Photovoltaic Industry Association has just published its “Global Market Outlook for Photovoltaics 2014-2018” report.
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What is the exact function of the #solar panels? Find out:

http://www.elitesolar.org/
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EcoWatch

Solar  - 
 
 
Solar Energy Gets a Boost: Singlet Fission

Scientists have reviewed chemists' work on "singlet fission," a process in which a single photon generates a pair of excited states. This conversion process has the potential to boost solar cell efficiency by as much as 30 percent.

http://ow.ly/yVMLL
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Alex Zinchenko's profile photoBill Juhasz's profile photoSimon Tyler's profile photo
 
I am not sure I totally understood, but it seems as though this is totally theoretical, ie they have not found any material that actually exhibits this characteristic.  If they could find one that would be good.
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Apple will build a huge #solar #farm on hundred acres in North Carolina http://goo.gl/RHMPdn
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Tenkiv
 
Already posted by another member.  Please check what is already on the community before posting.
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Top 5 Most Famous #Solar Sites in The World. Go Solar Today - http://goo.gl/yrNGX3
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Find the best solar panel installers in your area. http://bit.ly/1k6CMCr
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Qnergy

qnergy bought infinia and are now releasing their own products as well as the solar powered dish.
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Gadget could make rooftop #solar cheaper & more controlled +Gigaom +Ucilia Wang http://hubs.ly/q0FY70
Summary: A Virginia startup is using federal grants to develop a device that will cut solar home installation cost while helping the local utility monitor and even control electricity generation from the roofs of its customers.
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Geostellar's profile photoS.L Ong's profile photoBill Juhasz's profile photoMathieu Belanger-Camden's profile photo
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Why only smaller systems?   The bigger the array, the more likely the electric panel is going to be at capacity and require an upgrade to added solar (very costly).
It removes the need for bringing the wires into the house and often back out and then back in (for cut off switches).
Also eliminates the often needed electric panel upgrades that are very costly.
Makes a consistent environment for firefighters to cut off power, they just pull this along with the meter which they would pull anyway.
Yes in a nicely arranged home where the electric panel is easily accessible and close to the meter, and not at capacity, this would save little in material costs, but probably 4 hours or so for the electrician (not cheap).   In many homes with any number of the problems listed, it would save considerably in hours and materials.   
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While some believe #solar panels can hardly be relied upon as a “feasible source for constant energy” as they are “only useful in limited scenarios”, there are others who believe that #solarpanels can meet the world’s future power needs. There’s clearly a huge debate in this 
regard. What’s your take?

http://www.debate.org/opinions/is-solar-power-capable-of-becoming-the-worlds-future- power-supply
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Enough solar energy hits the Earth to provide for our needs.  The issues are in capturing it and storing it.  For example, during the Winter months, it is unlikely I would be able to capture enough solar energy via my rooftop installation over the course of an overcast ~8 hour day to run my house for the remaining 16 hours of darkness.  However, it is very likely I would be incapable of using all of the energy gathered during a bright 16 hour Summer day, so being able to store that for later would be the key.
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Here's a look at why we believe the solar industry is on an upward trend and will continue to thrive long after the federal tax credit is scheduled to disappear.

http://hub.am/VOJe9g
Admirals Bank is an Equal Housing Lender, Member FDIC and leading national provider of residential solar loans used to purchase home solar systems.
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Does geothermal heating and cooling work in better in tropical or dry climates? How about with Solar? What if you have a pool? Find answers to your geothermal HVAC questions in the National Geographic Great Energy Challenge Blog! http://goo.gl/a8Vq6d
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S.L Ong's profile photoBill Juhasz's profile photoSeth Leitman's profile photo
 
A quote from the linked article, "Unlike ordinary heating and cooling systems, geothermal HVAC systems do not burn fossil fuel to generate heat; they simply transfer heat to and from the earth. Typically, electric power is used only to operate the unit’s fan, compressor, and pump."  

This is very misleading, as a typical geothermal system works just like any other heat pump (air conditioner) except the heat/cold sink is the earth rather than the atmosphere.  There is little question that geothermal saves energy, but it is not an energy production system, so it is not renewable energy.  Essentially, a geothermal system increases the efficiency of a heat pump by having the heat sink at a warmer temperature in winter and cooler in summer, than it would be in an air sourced system.  In some exceptional situations, where there is geothermally heated hot water available (like in parts of Iceland, and some places in the US) then the geothermal system actually supplies the energy, and would legitimately be called a renewable energy source, but this is not the case in most geothermal systems.

The quotes I have seen for geothermal systems have been very high, often 10 times what an air sourced heat pump/air conditioner would cost.

The longevity of the in ground heat exchangers, which generally represent the majority of the cost of the system, is the subject of much debate.  Though it is entirely possible that an undisturbed heat exchanger could last almost indefinitely, often their is ground movement (due to tree roots, water movement, settling, or even seismic activity) that breaks the pipes. 

Another quote, "Standard air-source HVAC systems cost around $3,000 per ton of heating or cooling capacity, during new construction (homes usually use between one and five tons). Geothermal HVAC systems start at about $5,000 per ton, and can go as high as $8,000 or $9,000 per ton."

 I built a house recently and paid about $500 per ton (two 5 ton and one 3 ton unit) including the 90+% gas furnaces.  Even if I include the installation cost for the ducts, registers, etc. (things that would have been required with or without geothermal) the cost was about $1000 per ton.  Perhaps the cost for HVAC has gone up some since my house was built but not enough to reach $3000 per ton.
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Tenkiv
 
Already posted by another member.  Please check what is already on the community before posting.
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Little known impact of #solar #parks’ on plants, soil and climate http://goo.gl/YCjC87
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