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Suresh Amara

Discussion  - 
 
Most of us believe that employee’s leave organizations for money reasons. But if we really assess, we get to see that most employee’s leave organizations because of their managers or supervisors or
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Suresh Amara

Discussion  - 
 
Motivating employees is biggest challenge any employer is facing in today’s competitive environment. Only a motivated employee(s) will be able to perform or show highest level of productivity. There
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Alan Dayley

Success and failure stories  - 
 
What if you had a community that had no titles and no one in charge. How would things get done? How would you ensure needs are met? Gangplank is such a community and people there have learned a lot about real merit-based leadership.
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laurie corzett

Discussion  - 
 
 
Is it time to change our story of business itself?
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laurie corzett

Discussion  - 
 
people of a certain mindset expound on how job creators need to be cared for so we all might enjoy the benefits of employment
you know what curtails new enterprises from outperforming these traditional businesses -- subsidies paid by those who actually pay our taxes and laws/regulations favoring the already wealthy and their corporations
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James O'Sullivan's profile photo
 
Perhaps we just need to expand our definition of job creators to self employed and entrepreneurs. 
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Suresh Amara

Discussion  - 
 
It’s a normal practice that organizations are in look out for good employees. Likewise employees are also on look out for great organizations. What does employees look in organizations? Or simply, what makes an Organization as “Employer of Choice”?
It’s a normal practice that organizations are in look out for good employees. Organizations look for qualifications, skills, experience, expertise, attitude and fitment of prospective employee to the job position and culture ...
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James O'Sullivan
owner

Discussion  - 
 
I love this post by community members +Gideon Rosenblatt. The following is my comment on the op:

"I totally think of an organization as a type of life. As you point out, they are complex adaptive systems. i.e. they are more than a sum of their parts. That said, they are far from human. As we've spoke about before, I believe that l size is an important factor as to how human an organization can be. Technology can enable us to give a small group of people a very large megaphone. If we are able to keep that size small, the organization will more likely be able to retain it's humanity. It was pointed out to me recently that when we get to unrestrained growth, the nearest analogy is that of a cancer. All types of organisms have an optimal size for their environment, but we also have a diversity of organism types too. I see that a company, based on it's environment, has an optimal size. That size might change as it evolves, but not rapidly (though individual parts might change rapidly internally). Companies are getting smaller and hence more human. Perhaps it'll eventually collapse down to the single digits one day. Perhaps as tech improves and companies get smaller, they become more intelligent (though not quite sentient)."

"One final edit, we seem to be slowly shifting our language away from the industrial age mechanism model to an organism model. Machines are soulless things. We can't keep on applying the rigidity of the machine over a living system."

I'd love to know the community's thoughts on this topic. 
 
Are Organizations Alive?
Is the evolution of technology transforming organizations into a new form of life? And if so, what role will humans play?

With each passing year, organizations act more and more like living entities thanks to the evolution of technology. In this brand new piece, I ask some provocative questions that have been gnawing at me for some time now. This article represents a shift in the focus of my writing.  But if you read it, you will see that it ultimately still ties back to the need to build businesses and other organizations in ways that stand for something more than just the quest for profit. In this sense, this piece just raises the stakes for doing that. 

This is a hypothesis, and so I am very interested in feedback on the ideas outlined here. No one knows the future. 

#artificialintelligence   #life   #organization  

cc: +Jeff Sayre, +Gregory Esau, +Leland LeCuyer, +John Kellden+Mark Traphagen, +Drew Sowersby, +Georgina Lester+Otto Hunt, +Jeff Jockisch, +David Amerland, +RobotEnomics, +Susanne Ramharter, +Mark Bruce, +Thomas Morffew, +Thomas Vander Wal, +Jessica Obermayer       
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Gerardine Rudolphy's profile photoGideon Rosenblatt's profile photo
4 comments
 
Thanks for the comment, +Gerardine Rudolphy. I just purchased a copy of that paper, thanks to your pointer.

The problem with working with these newly emerging systems, is that they exhibit some attributes that are vaguely familiar because of their human elements. But they are much more than that and so they also exhibit attributes that require a different lens to understand them. That is the journey I'm now setting out on. 

Here's some of the abstract on that article by the way. Thanks again for the pointer: 

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Purpose – Anthropomorphism is the attribution of human characteristics to gods, plants, animals or inanimate objects (the wind, rocks, etc.). This paper sets out to disprove the association of anthropomorphic characteristics with individual organizations.

Design/methodology/approach – This paper discusses anthropomorphism in organization theory because many scholars argue that organizations are human or like human beings. Some examples of “An organization called Harry” in organization literature are presented.

Findings – Three causes of anthropomorphism can be traced. The negative, rather than any positive, consequences of anthropomorphism in organization literature are discussed.
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James O'Sullivan
owner

Discussion  - 
 
Everyday we tell each other, and reinforce, the stories of our current reality and weave a tapestry of a greater narrative. I believe we should be telling new stories of the future of work and weaving our own tapestry. What stories are you hearing or telling on this subject?
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Ben Roberts's profile photoJames O'Sullivan's profile photo
7 comments
 
You're so very welcome!
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laurie corzett

Discussion  - 
 
"We use the term "maker movement" for a reason. A movement implies a shared view that is motivating people to participate and collaborate. Overall, participants in the maker movement share a vision of nothing less than changing the world, "freeing the worker" from the rote and unempowered work of corporations and into doing something fulfilling and creative that may well transcend the profit motive."
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James O'Sullivan
owner

Discussion  - 
 
I believe that traditional organizations are a combination of fragility and robustness. The fragility is the key to their demise though. As our technology improves, fragility increases from this external stressor. To take a metaphor from the book Antifragile, I see technology acceleration as a Sword of Damocles for many businesses.

A few of the questions about this, I currently have are as follows:

How can we construct organizations that get stronger with the stress of technology acceleration?

What examples of this have people seen in the wild?
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Ben Roberts's profile photo
9 comments
 
As part of the Mycelium Story conversation I mentioned above, we also created this pad where we started our own musings on the subject: https://hackpad.com/Initial-thoughts-on-Mycelium-as-a-Metaphor-Wlm2UMjCRei
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"If we are lending money that ostensibly we don't have to kids who have no hope of making it back in order to train them for jobs that clearly don't exist, I might suggest that we've gone around the bend a little bit," -- +Mike Rowe 

Building better places to work also means redefining what "valuable work" means. And what "desirable jobs" might be.
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About this community

We're currently standing at a crossroads. The 20th century ways of doing business are failing us due to the rapid pace of innovation. Companies are dying out quicker only to be replaced by others. We need to look for better ways to work and use that knowledge to build better places to work. Agile software development, Cynefin, Lean and systems thinking have all started moving us in a good direction and are things that can be built on. My hope is that we can bring together people from disparate fields to discuss better ways of working. Fields such as technology, evolution, psychology, education and neuroscience to name but a few. By combining our insights and looking at our own failures and successes, we can hopefully move forwards. Image via http://www.flickr.com/photos/qstreetdc/8017082/

Mike Pearce
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
I often struggle to find content on #FutureWork (or, whatever you call it). Does anyone have any decent links to blogs, feeds, twitter accounts etc that you follow that provides regular content?

I spend time trawling Psychology sites, or HR sites (sometimes that's hard work!), but am never truly satisfied. I find it hard to believe that the future of work is such a small community on the web, it's more likely that I just cannot find it!

Either that, or we are at the tipping point and it's our job to push it over!
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Alan Dayley's profile photoMike Pearce's profile photo
2 comments
 
Damnit, another project!
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Paul Simbeck-Hampson

Success and failure stories  - 
 
 
A Peek Inside Alibaba's Corporate Culture

Insights: "Alibaba team has snowballed from the original 18 founding members to a giant of 24,000, some of the cultural elements from its earlier start-up days have been carefully retained.
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First and foremost among those is transparency.
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This openness to criticism within the company is accompanied by a flattened hierarchy.
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A third characteristic of the corporate culture is a sense of family unity."

#culture #transparency #hierarchy #family
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#Leadership is not about control. Image via +Ted Rubin on #Instagram

Leadership is about inspiring...
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Wanja Krah's profile photo
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Suresh Amara

Discussion  - 
 
What is employee survey? How to design a employee survey?
In today’s context of highly competitive environment, Organizations are always in the mode of adopting various practices for high employee satisfaction and retention. Organizations tend to collect feedback from employees in m...
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Mike Pearce
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
I write about a study which reports the findings that surface acting in meetings makes the meeting to be perceived as less valuable. Surface acting also causes the actor to report higher feelings of burnout or emotional stress.
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Adam Scislowicz's profile photoMike Pearce's profile photo
3 comments
 
Mike Pearce: Indeed, Ideally one would not 'act' at all. But I think it is situationally pruident (practical) due to the vast variety of expectations different sub-cultures have, and some are not yet and may never be tolerant of other cultures and so may be strongly offended or become reactive if one simply doesn't act at all when in their company.
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laurie corzett

Discussion  - 
 
 
Change the Conversation to Change the Change

The question driving many technology transformations is:
 'What can we do to make people do the right thing?'

Changing the question to one that focuses on realising potential can reveal radically different insights into how to achieve goals.  For example, the answers and engagement are very different when you ask instead:
"what do our people need to better deliver on our goals?"

#leadership   #change   #transformation  
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Hey workplace champions!

Here's my recent post on workplace #excellence and #innovation  

Living ecosystems will be converging over the coming months to celebrate joyful workplaces and the triumph of the human spirit

This will be a very fun and exciting ride

You are more than welcomed to join in this exhilarating experience!

Johann
 
http://www.nothingbutexcellence.net/?p=1244
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laurie corzett

Discussion  - 
 
"Goodnight, who co-founded the North Carolina-based business analytics software giant and has kept it privately held and debt-free, believes employees are the company's greatest asset. He not only treats them well with a competitive salary and benefits package and has designed a work campus that fosters a work-life balance, he empowers them "to do the job they were hired to do." And again, says Goodnight, it's because treating employees well just makes good business sense. The proof is in the turnover pudding: SAS has the lowest voluntary turnover rate of any company in the tech sector -- a mere 3 percent a year with the industry average at times reaching a whopping 22 percent. Employee turnover is a killer for companies because of the high expense associated with the recruitment, hiring and screening, and training of replacement workers.

While some of SAS's campus perks -- like day care, subsidized food, and on-site health care -- are certainly lures, what really keeps SAS's employees there, said Goodnight, is that the work is challenging and interesting. They don't get bored; they feel engaged. And yes, they feel empowered."

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/01/29/worlds-best-company_n_4655292.html
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You guys might get a kick out of an initiative I'm involved in called the Thrivable World Quest.  So far, it's in 5 cities (Amsterdam, Berlin, Cape Town, Johannesburg, Montreal).  If you're in any of those, please join us on this huge group treasure hunt for how organizations must be if humanity is to survive - and thrive.  Over the next few months, we'll add more online conversation, as well as new cities.  Join the Quest!  :-)  www.thrivableworld.org
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James O'Sullivan's profile photo
 
This looks exactly like the type of thing this community should get involved with. Please keep us up to date as more cities get added and as online events start up. I'd also love to find out more
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