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Next year, ICCP will be held in Tokyo!
http://iccp2019.naist.jp/
IEEE ICCP2019 Tokyo
IEEE ICCP2019 Tokyo
iccp2019.naist.jp

Video & Photo Gallery: Unboxing Xiaomi Mi Magic Controller MFKZQ01LM












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Anyone use this book? Was it helpful?
Photo

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Learn about the future of 360° Virtual Reality Photography and 360° Video and related Computational Photography Topics at  at  Prague 2015 Conference!  
http://ivrpa.org/event/prague-2015/

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Here is the video of my talk on Computational Imaging at the Technion's TCE conference. Slides are also available on my website.

Abstract:
Fancy cameras used to be the exclusive domain of professional photographers and experimental scientists. Times have changed, but even as recently as a decade ago, consumer cameras were solitary pieces of hardware and glass; disconnected gadgets with little brains, and no software. But now, everyone owns a smartphone with a powerful processor, and every smartphone has a camera. These mobile cameras are simple, costing only a few dollars per unit. And on their own, they are no competition for their more expensive cousins. But coupled with the processing power native to the devices in which they sit, they are so effective that much of the low-end point-and-shoot camera market has already been decimated by mobile photography. 
 
Computational imaging is the enabler for this new paradigm in consumer photography. It is the art, science, and engineering of producing a great shot (moving or still) from small form factor, mobile cameras. It does so by changing the rules of image capture — recording information in space, time, and across other degrees of freedom — while relying heavily on post-processing to produce a final result. Ironically, in this respect, mobile imaging devices are now more like scientific instruments than conventional cameras. This has deep implications for the future of consumer photography.

In this technological landscape, Google Glass is an example of what is possible and what is still ahead. Glass is the first head-mounted burst-based mobile camera on the market. But this is only a prelude to a much larger story that is just unfolding. Coupled with the ubiquity of devices, open platforms for imaging will inevitably lead to an explosion of technical and economic activity, as was the case with other types of mobile applications. In this wild ride, it is time for clever algorithms, along with dedicated hardware architectures, to take center stage and enable unprecedented imaging capabilities in the user’s hands.

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Importing and processing RAW image data is a pain. To address this, one of my students +Rob Sumner has written a nice tutorial guide, complete with code and examples. Let us know what you think. 

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Established a couple of years ago by the SIAM (Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) imaging working group, this award is not restricted to papers from SIAM publications. So if you are interested in nominating a deserving paper from any other publication, you can. (For instance, last time the prize was awarded to a paper published in PAMI.)  *Deadline for nominations is Sept. 15*

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Do you design image processing filters (especially for denoising or sharpening)?  Here is a nice and easy way to improve the performance of almost any of them: Make the matrix that defines the filter symmetric. This paper describes the why and the how of this process, showing that it is widely applicable. 

PDF is here: 
http://users.soe.ucsc.edu/~milanfar/publications/journal/SIIMS.pdf

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Today is the Early Registration Deadline for ICCP 2013. Register now and save some money! 
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