Post is pinned.Post has attachment
Hangout Schedules Calendar, Index & Updates
Calendar: goo.gl/YodHQc | Index: goo.gl/kLHvSo
House Rules: goo.gl/uXW4Ik | Slack: goo.gl/WF2QlE
This post is an overview of the hangouts we keep track on in the calendar and the index page on our website. Links to previous versions of this post are at the bottom. We will now use the comments of this post mainly as a changelog for the calendar and for other hangout-related updates - if you know about an interesting hangout, feel free to comment here or put the event in the Hangouts & Podcasts section!

Astronomy Cast Live
Live recording of the podcast with +Pamela L. Gay and +Fraser Cain
Broadcast usually Fridays at 21:30 UTC after the WSH.
See +Astronomy Cast and +CosmoQuest for announcements and updates. Audio Podcast available at www.astronomycast.com.
Youtube Archive Playlist: goo.gl/RCT9DM

Weekly Space Hangout
Weekly space news show hosted by +Fraser Cain with a rotating crew of guest journalists. Broadcast usually Fridays at 20:00 UTC.
See +Universe Today for details and announcements.
Youtube Archive Playlist: goo.gl/Kh1VvI

Learning Space
Semi-regular hangouts about science and astronomy in education, hosted by +Pamela L. Gay, +Georgia Bracey & +Nicole Gugliucci. On hiatus at the moment.
Schedule: goo.gl/GBjO7a
See +Learning Space and +CosmoQuest for details and announcements.
Youtube Archive Playlist: goo.gl/PYCmsR

Center for Lunar Science and Exploration Hangouts
New hangout series from +CosmoQuest and the +Center for Lunar Science and Exploration, hosted by +Pamela L. Gay.
Youtube Archive Playlist: goo.gl/LpqAHZ

Global Star Party
New semi-regular hangout series with live telescope views and astrophotography discussions. See +Global Star Party for announcements and updates. Unofficial heir of the Virtual Star Party
Youtube Archive Playlist: goo.gl/DGYgXe

Deep Astronomy
Weekly hangouts hosted by +Tony Darnell, broadcast usually Thursdays between 19-21:00 UTC
See +Deep Astronomy for updates and announcements
Youtube Archive Playlist: goo.gl/jrFQzz

Dawn EPO / CosmoQuest Hangouts
Semi-regular hangouts with the Dawn Mission EPO team in collaboration with CosmoQuest.
See +Dawn Mission Engagement and Communications (E/C) for updates and announcements.
Youtube Archive Playlist: goo.gl/C2yjT0

Google Lunar XPrize Hangouts
Semi-regular hangouts with the Google Lunar XPrize contestants, hosted by +Pamela L. Gay in collaboration with +CosmoQuest.
See +Google Lunar XPRIZE for updates and announcements.
Youtube Archive Playlist: goo.gl/ykCTKH

Astronomers Without Borders Hangouts
Semi-regular hangouts with special guests, hosted by +Mike Simmons. See +Astronomers Without Borders for updates and announcements.
Youtube Archive Playlist: goo.gl/MMdJQj

Previous versions of this post are located here:
» goo.gl/eUjsM8 - July-September 2014
» goo.gl/yN3Lve - September-October 2014
» goo.gl/F7crLo - October-December 2014
» goo.gl/3sHx1I - January-February 2015
» goo.gl/pfNG3j - March 2015 (replaced with Hangoutathon version)
» goo.gl/dIX2wl - March-May 2015 (Hangoutathon version)
» goo.gl/2zigFC - May-August 2015
» goo.gl/ACxFpt - August 2015 II
» goo.gl/AM9PQ4 - August-September 2015 (Summer Hiatus Edition)
» goo.gl/ku1YYu - September 2015 - January 2016 (Changed out for clean comment section)
» goo.gl/ROhy98 - January 2016 - October 2016 (Changed out for clean comment section)
Photo

Post has attachment

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
There's a somewhat curious article on the German IT news portal Heise in which the German GLPX team PTScientists is basically blaming both or alternately SpaceX and the XPrize Foundation for their loss in the race.

They are saying that the delays from the launch pad explosion caused them to miss the 2017 deadline, but what I think is very strange here is that they announced in November 2016 that they had a contract through Spaceflight, the same company that SpaceIL is working with. At that time, it wasn't even clear which launch provider they would be using.

But what I found really infuriating was the last paragraph of the article, in which one of the PTScientists team members says (and this is a literal translation): "Robert Böhme estimates the chances of the other teams as rather small, since their technology has hardly been tested at all or key components are still missing. He does acknowledge that the Indian team has good prospects for a successful lunar mission because it is supported by the Indian Space Agency ISRO, but even this could take a couple of years."

There's also a remark that the Google Lunar XPrize will be "silently shut down anyway" in 2017 because "ten years are more than enough". That's misleading at best, because the competition has now basically run its course as planned!

What a disappointing behaviour. PTScientists literally think they're better than everyone else, claim that the GLPX is a failure and that the other teams are incompetent. I expected better from them. 

Post has attachment
Next year's state of the union address should prove to be very interesting I think

Post has attachment
How's this for nightmare fuel: astronomers have apparently found a rogue object flying away from the center of its host galaxy at a speed of >2,000 km/sec. Is it a rogue planet? Pffft. Maybe a runaway star? Small fry. Try a 1-billion solar mass black hole! Now we're cooking w/physics!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K09zNxtJ11s

The video describes what may be the best candidate yet observed of a quasar flung away from the two merging galaxies as a result of a significant difference in the masses of the two original galactic cores. The paper referenced was accepted for publication by the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics back in January of this year, & may be found in its entirety at either of the links below:

https://www.spacetelescope.org/static/archives/releases/science_papers/heic1706/heic1706a.pdf

https://arxiv.org/abs/1611.05501

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
I've uploaded the video from our Summer Lecture (late decision to do so, the reason for low quality). On the 10th of March 2017, We celebrated the 40th anniversary of the co-discovery of Uranus’s rings. This was a massive achievement for Western Australia, the Perth Observatory and its staff as the results they delivered made WA an important astronomy outpost to the scientific community.

Former Perth Observatory astronomer Peter Birch, who was an observer on the night of the discovery, is the speaker and talks about the lead up to the event and the explain how the Perth Observatory helped discover Uranus’s Rings.

https://youtu.be/s_tf13kQOvg

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
Wait while more posts are being loaded