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Nevada northern BEST PICTURE 
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N&WE 611 on her first excursion of 2017, from Spencer, NC to Lynchburg, VA. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sMDqqH3-3cw

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The March 2017 “Fine-Scale Modeling” issue of the YouTube Model Builders eMag is now available! Download your copy here: http://www.youtubemodelbuilders.com/emag/download/YTMBeMagR14.pdf

Winter seems to be hanging on tight. But that’s alright; we get to work on our layouts or play with our model railroads just a little longer before we are lured outdoors by the warm weather.

This issue is the third part of the trilogy of issues that started with the November 2016 issue which explored the topic of craftsmanship. The prior issue (January 2016) explored the topics of rust, dirt, and grime. In this issue, we focus on fine-scale modeling. The definition of fine-scale modeling varies depending on who you ask. Fine-scale modeling, according to Miles Hale, is not necessarily about the level of weathering or how long it took you to finish your model. It really comes down to not only the level of skills and techniques that are above and beyond the basic set of skills necessary for modeling, but down to the meticulous attention to details, your ability to be prototypically accurate, your knowledge of and willingness to research the prototypes, and your understanding of the era and the history of what you are modeling.

Ralph Renzetti, a master modeler who specializes in weathering engines and rolling stock, teaches us a unique technique for creating and applying wall posters and signs to our structures so they have that old weathered look. Jack Hykaway documents our interviews with Ralph Renzetti and Miles Hale and their thoughts on fine-scale modeling and tips from these pros you can apply to your modeling efforts. Bill Graham explores overcoming our fears and the limitations of our pre-set comfort zone when building a fine-scale model in his whimsical article entitled “You Can Do It!”

The Track Planner asks that we be honest with ourselves so we can formulate a detailed plan that addresses what we are trying to accomplish with our layout, how much space will be required, what era will work best, what standards we need to follow, and whether we are a freelance modeler, a prototype modeler, or a combination of both.

Harry M. Haythorn writes about the history and the features of Union Pacific’s Bailey Yard - the world’s largest classification yard. Geno Sharp, in his column Geno’s Corner, explores the challenges of being prototypically correct and a workaround he employed when full-length passenger cars just wouldn’t look prototypical on his new layout. Jack Hykaway gives a brief history of the San Francisco cable cars in this issue of Jack’s Junction.

If you enjoy reading in-depth philosophical explorations, then you will not only be challenged but will also relish reading the Food for Thought… column in which Andy Crawford contemplates the evolution of terms and definitions we use in our modeling language.

Remember, YouTube Model Builders eMag is a free publication released by model railroaders for model railroaders. It’s completely ad-free and free for you! Also, keep in mind that it is a community publication and that means we want you to send us your articles and pictures so we can help you share your expertise with others in this hobby.

Happy Model Railroading!

JD (Loggin’ Locos)
Editor-in-Chief
YouTube Model Builders eMag

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Thank you for showing those images, and they where very nice to vue as I am happy to see them. ! :-)

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